A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

The Rivals - Bubbly Bath Soap Opera
Thursday, January 14, 2016


Sitting Luisa Jojic & Emma Slipp - Standing Jenny Wasko-Patterson & Gabrielle Rose - Jan12, 2016


For those who have gotten this far and want to read my take of Blackbird Theatre’s production of Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s The Rivals at the Cultch jump immediately to Part II

Part I
My mother who was a consummate pianist often told me that after Henry Purcell good English composers faded from history. Since then I have come to disagree with her but she is not around for me to state my point. In a similar manner (my ignorance of course) I thought that between Shakespeare's plays and Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Ernest there was a long vacuum in the English theatre.

My first glimpse to my errors happened in 1971 when I saw Giuseppe Patroni Griffi’s film 'Tis Pity She’s a Whore with (yes!) Charlotte Rampling. The film was based in a play, a tragedy, by English playwright John Ford. It seems the play was performed between 1629 and 1633.

Then in 2006 I went to a performance of Richard Brinsley Sheridan’s The School For Scandal. This was an Arts Club Theatre production at the Stanley and directed splendidly by Dean Paul Gibson.

This amateur then came at the possibly erroneous deduction that Richard Brinsley Sheridan (Irish not English - 1751 –1816) was sort of a low-brow Shakespeare. Besides being a playwright Sheridan was a politician who served in the British House of Commons for 32 years.

Two events in that show, The School For Scandal, have remained with me aside from the fact that the play was hilariously funny.

Christopher Gaze played two parts and one of them was of a butler called Humphreys. If you research Sheridan’s play you will find out that the butler is unnamed. Almost hidden in the credits was that one named C.C. Humphreys had been consultant on the interpretation and pronunciation of the Sheridan’s dialogue.

I had photographed UBC sports doctor Dr. Doug Clement. He and his wife were sitting in front of me. I wondered why until I checked the actor credits and found that their daughter Jennifer played the hilariously named Lady Sneerwell. During this play Jennifer Clement performed the most realistic faux-sex act I have ever seen on a Vancouver stage. Suffice to note that my face turned into a very red tomato perhaps in solidarity to the same-named Clement restaurant on Cambie.

Rosemary and I attended a performance of Blackbird Theatre’s The Rivals, a play by Sheridan directed by Johnna Wright at the Cultch on Tuesday. By the opening curtain (there was none) I can assure you that I have some interesting and convoluted knowledge about this play that may explain Christopher Gaze’s role as the butler Humphreys in The School For Scandal.

In 2003  I read a very fine swashbuckler Jack Absolute by C.C. Humphreys. I was so taken by it that when the next two, The Blooding of Jack Absolute and Absolute Honour appeared I read them. By the second novel I found out that Humphreys now lived in Vancouver with his wife. I contacted him and he came to my studio and posed with a sabre. Humphreys, I quickly found out was not only an author, but also a swordsman and an actor. Before 2003 he had performed Hamlet and Sheridan’s The Rivals on the London stage. And you must know that the principal protagonist of The Rivals is a dashing captain called Jack Absolute.

C.C. Humphreys as Jack Absolute - 1987
Humphreys became almost obsessed with the Absolute character. He came to Vancouver and crashed in then Artistic Director of the Writer’s Festival, Alma Lee’s basement and wrote Jack Absolute.
Consider then that the actor playing Jack Absolute writes a novel in which the protagonist is the very man, Jack Absolute and that Absolute (the protagonist in the novel) goes to the first day performance of The Rivals and buttonholes Sheridan for writing him into the play.

Captain Jack Absolute marched forward, his eyes reflecting the flames of a thousand candles.
‘There will be light enough; there will, as Sir Lucious says, “be very pretty small-sword light, though it won’t do for long shot.”He raised an imaginary pistol, ‘fired’it with a loud vocal ‘boom’, then added, “Confound his long shots!
This last, delivered in an exaggerated Irish brogue, conjured a huge roar of laughter from the pit and a smattering of applause from the galleries. The bold Captain had a way with him!

Or was that the actor playing him?

In the pit the real Jack Absolute had suffered more than enough. He rose and squeezed through the tiny gap between knees and the backs of the benches, trying to obscure as little of the stage as possible, though his kindly efforts were rewarded with cries of, ‘Sit down, sirrah,’and ‘Unmannerly dog! Woodward is speaking! From above, the actors glared down at him before continuing the scene… and when, in a fury, he’d tracked his old friend Sheridan down, the rogue had barely blinked at the his misappropriation of Jack’s name and history.
Jack Absolute – C.C. Humphreys - 2003

Since Chris (to friends) Humphreys is a friend of Christopher Gaze, Gaze and Dean Paul Gibson decided on that inside joke of calling the unnamed butler Humphreys in that 2006 production of The School For Scandal.

Part II

If there has to be a rationalization to attend a play on a cold and rainy Vancouver evening it is simple. It is about three women, all who are gems. For one the play is directed by Johnna Wright. Years ago I took Rosemary to an evening of one act/one actor plays on Granville Island. Between plays there was a young woman sweeping the theatre floor. The same woman was selling the wine and sweets during the interval. My wife asked me who she was. “That’s Johnna Wright, the director!”

Gabrielle Rose, who plays Mrs. Malaprop is a Canadian national treasure of an actress (I’m old fashioned so I say actress) whose list of credits is miles long. I remember her best from the Arts Club Theatre Company’s production of Whose Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Directed by Wright’s father (and Artistic Director of Blackbird Theatre) John Wright. It is amazing to see a very good and professional actress do her thing which such skill while obviously having lots of fun.

The third reason is Emma Slipp. For reasons I very well know she is continuously being described as luscious Emma Slipp. This is obvious  the moment the play opens on her bath in Bath. After having seen her last year in the stage production of Farewell My Lovely directed by Aaron Bushkowsky (an Arts Club Theatre production) I can assure you she is more than a pretty face and etc.

After Tuesday’s performance I felt like this play should have further exposure, sort of like a midnight showing of the Rocky Horror Picture Show. I felt like shouting at John Emmet Tracy who plays Faulkland the retentive pessimist, “Shut up and kiss Julia Mellvile (played with sense and sensibility by Luisa Jojic). Jojic is the kind of woman I imagine at a public library front desk making us all swoon under her readers.

Jenny Wasko-Patterson plays a man (David) and a woman(Lucy). As a woman she is devious and I had no idea on whose side she was.

Duncan Fraser plays the English Gentleman of uncertain parentage (is he a bastard or not?) to the hilt and Scott Bellis’s is the kind of American (he is not one in real life) that made me glad I live in Canada.

Kirk Smith as Bob Acres is over the top and fits Humphrey’s Jack Absolute description as in my Part I. And can he dance!

But it was Martin Happer, as Jack Absolute that I scrutinized in detail. I had seen him before in The 39 Steps and I was aware of his dashing good looks and Bruce Wayne square jaw. His soto-voce to the audience nicely reminded me of Ian Richardson in House of Cards. He passed muster for me but I wonder how he would have fared in a mock duel with that other Jack Absolute.

The play was so satisfying for me that I came to the late realization that Bill Millerd is not a theatrical God. If he were he would have mounted this play.

If anybody here wonders what book Gabrielle Rose is holding it is Humphrey’s Jack Absolute. Humphrey’s wife requested Rose hold the book as Rose and Humphreys appeared in a play together many years ago.

At the play I noticed people who were mostly my age. For that younger generation that avoids Shakespeare because the language is difficult, The Rivals offers them the pleasure of listening to a sophisticated English, the manipulation of words in a medium that is understandable and that entertains.






I Took My Power In My Hand
Wednesday, January 13, 2016





I TOOK my power in my hand    

And went against the world;

’T was not so much as David had,    

But I was twice as bold. 

 

I aimed my pebble, but myself           

Was all the one that fell.

Was it Goliath was too large,

Or only I too small?

Emily Dickinson

 I find my feet have further goals
 I cannot dance upon my toes
The Music of the Violin does not emerge alone
Red Blaze 
He touched me, so I live to know
Rear Window- The Entering Takes Away
Said Death to Passion
 We Wear the Mask That Grins And Lies
It was not death for I stood alone
The Music in the Violin Does Not Emerge Alone
I tend my flowers for thee
Lavinia Norcross Dickinson
Pray gather me anemone! 
Ample make her bed
His caravan of red 
Me-come! My dazzled face  
Develops pearl and weed

But peers beyond her mesh
Surgeons must be very careful
Water is taught by thirst
I could not prove that years had feet
April played her fiddle
A violin in Baize replaced
I think the longest hour
The spirit lasts
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/03/i-left-them-in-ground-emily-dickinson.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/01/i-felt-my-life-with-both-my-hands.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/currer-bell-emily-dickinson-charlotte.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/and-zero-at-bone-with-dirks-of-melody.html


http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/i-could-not-see-to-see.html 
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/blonde-assasin-passes-on.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2012/12/you-almost-bathed-your-tongue.html



A Quotidian Custom
Tuesday, January 12, 2016



It seems to me that the word routine has been given a bad name perhaps because of its overuse. A less frequent but with a similar meaning is quotidian or every day.

It was perhaps around 17 years ago my friend Mark Budgen (who died in the waning months of 2015) told me that I could get a daily subscription to the New York Times.

Since then we have been getting the paper daily. It shows up at our doorstep around four in the morning but on Saturday nights, not later than nine in the evening the large Sunday edition crashed on that front door. The daily NY Times initiated a routine that became a never-to-be taken lightly pleasure. This is the pleasure of having breakfast in bed with my wife in which she gets to read the NY Times while I read the Vancouver Sun. We alternate then as we also alternate who prepares the breakfast and brings it up in our Filipino made wicker tray that we spotted in the little window on the Robson side of the long-gone Eaton’s.

Ten years ago we had bacon on Sundays. Now breakfast is the same every day except on insomnia mornings (many with this terrible slow move from the big old house to the newer small duplex). On those insomnia mornings I make myself a couple of soft-boiled eggs (3 minutes 45 seconds) and a large mug of very strong Yorkshire Gold loose tea. On some mornings I make my rosemary her favourite cream-of-wheat sweetened with brown sugar. She has her usual decaf, a glass of orange juice while I partake of the smooth and seasoned V-8. Since Venice Bakery disappeared I now get my bake-in-the-oven scissor rolls (no butter or jam on them) at Save-On. Rosemary opts for President's choice Buttermilk Waffles with Bonne Mamam Strawberry jam.When she makes the breakfast she does not use butter on her waffles. When I make it I do. In the picture you see the two little trays with the pills that people of our age seem to need in order to have quotidian life.

Even in times of stress we make sure one of our iPhones (my 3G or her 4) wakes us up with enough time for breakfast and the papers (and a bath) before we embark on whatever will be our less satisfying quotidian event of that day. 

Note that today we slept in and breakfast was ready at 10:19.



My New Ikea MÄSTERBY Step Stool & My 30 Year Detritus
Sunday, January 10, 2016







Had I known about the collection of stuff I  would one day amass, for a few minutes many years ago when I contemplated becoming a Holy Cross Brother, I would have surely ended up as Brother Alexander Waterhouse-Hayward, C.S.C.

For a few minutes I wondered about being told that I had to go to one of the missions in Africa and that I was to pack. I knew that into a suitcase I would have placed a bible, four pairs of black socks, a couple of black pants, four white shirts, one black sweater and whatever necessary toiletry and underwear I might need. As an extra I could have picked a couple of novels and portraits of my father and mother. And that would  have been it.

But now in 2016 after 30 years in one home the detritus of my life is almost overwhelming. It is impossible to give books away and my many years of National Geographic will have to be trashed. Should I keep at least one copy of every magazine I ever had a photograph in?  I have hundreds of Georgia Straights and at least 50 covers. What is the use of keeping them? Are they legacy for others?

About 25 years ago my old Sony Trinitron ( I still have a newer Trinitron) sparked and caught on fire. I had to get rid of it.  I went to the Vancouver City Dump and paid a special fee. This enabled me to enter a cavernous building that went many (hundreds?) of feet down in what was a spiral route that a huge excavator used. There was one at the bottom. I was allowed by my fee to lift the Trinitron into the air and then listen to it crash at the bottom. I must confess that the pleasure was meaningful.

Today I went to Ikea to buy a kitchen step stool. It is made of one piece and it is solid and sturdy. With my Ikea step stool in the back seat of my Malibu and with the trunk full of that aforementioned detritus I drove a few blocks to a street that had three very large metal bins. With my stepladder I was able to get high enough up the bin to throw the stuff into it. The noise while pleasing to the ear was not as satisfying as that Trinitron of yore.

There has to be at least a few good things going when on is living in Slow Dresden. And getting rid of stuff is that much easier.



     

Previous Posts
Diminishing Returns - Not

While the Greek Music Lasts

Is She The Duchesse?

Abraham Darby - Three Men & an Over the Top Rose

Doctor Pat McGeer - The Basketball Player

The State of Being Alone

Red

Grace & Elegance

I hoed and trenched and weeded

Performances That Have Melted Into Thin Air



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6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17