A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Glykysides In Our Spring Garden
Saturday, March 28, 2015




Since we officially began gardening in our Athlone Street house in 1986 my wife soon became a Master Gardener and a FOG (Friend of the Garden at UBC). With fewer official gardening activities I had more time to learn about plants. I know considerably lots of useless facts about hostas, roses, ferns and trees.

I know nothing about peonies.

I do know that the funny word for these plants is pronounced exactly like that yearly activity on Hastings and Renfrew, the PNE. I avoid it.

In our garden we have two tree peonies (they do not resemble trees at all) and a few herbaceous peonies. The house came with the pink tree peony proving the fact that tree peonies can live up to at least a century if the garden they are planted in is not plowed under with its accompanying house as ours (the house and garden) will someday soon.

There are four peonies and all have scent. In three the scent is sweet and most interesting. In a fourth the scent is on the borderline between offensive and not.

Google has made our beautiful stacking bookcase (glass doors that slide in) and its rather large collection of botanical volumes obsolete. If you cannot remember the name Meconopsis betonicifolia you cannot find the reference in any of those books. It is far simpler to go to Googgle and punch in blue Himalayan poppy.

But no Google can gather up such interesting and varied facts about plants as some of our books. The book on Aroids trumps up on anything you might find in Wikipedia.

One of our most loved books is Frances Perry Flowers of the World and illustrated by Leslie Greenwood. The former is followed by the initials M.B.E., V.M.H., F.L.S. and the latter by F.L.S., and F.R.S.A. You can Google them if you like.



Of peonies it begins with:

1 genus and 33 species. This family contains a single genus of dicotyledonous perennials previously included under Ranunculaceae. There are about 33 species, all N temperate, with rhizomatous or tuberous roots; the majority are herbaceous plants but several are of a shrubby nature.

There is more (lots more) of that but this caught my interest:

Paeonia officianalis  is mentioned by Theophrastus, a friend and pupil of Plato and Aristotle, in his Enquiry into Plants (370 B.C.). He calls it ‘the paeony which some call glykyside’ and advised that the roots (reputed to cure wounds) should be dug at dead of night for if the operation were viewed by a woodpecker the digger risked attack and possibly ‘the loss of his eyesight’. Like the Mandrake it was recommended that the ceremony be carried with the aid of a hungry dog – tied to a string and enticed by the smell of roast meet, for the groans of the plant as its roots were torn up would, according to the Ancients, prove fatal to all who heard it! 











Slide Soft Your Silver Floods With La Rêveuse
Friday, March 27, 2015


March 27 2015

Slide soft you silver floods
And ev'ry Spring
Within these shady woods;
Let no bird sing,
         
Slide soft you silver floods
And ev'ry Spring
Within these shady woods;
Let no bird sing,
But from this grove a turtle dove
Be seen to couple with his love:
But silence on each dale and mountain dwell,
Whilst that I weeping bid my love farewell.

You nymphs of Thetis' train,
You mermaids fair
That on these shores do plane
Your seagreen hair,
As you in trammels knit your locks
Weep ye, and force the craggy rocks
In heavy murmurs through broad shores tell
How that I weeping bid my love farewell.
Henry Lawes - 1595-1662



English Cavaliers - Left the American Jeffrey Thompson & right the Frenchman Bertrand Cuiller

Sometime in 1962 I heard Jazz Samba with Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd.

Sometime in the 1980s I played a new cassette tape featuring Pablo Casals directing a super quick interpretation of Bach’s Second Brandenburg Concerto.

On November 28, 2008 I heard Olivier Messiaen’s A Quartet for the End of Time.

In 1964 in Buenos Aires I was offered a taste of marvelous peach yoghurt.

Tonight I heard an Early Music Vancouver presentation of Songs of an English Cavalier with  the French group La Rêveuse featuring American tenor Jeffrey Thompson at the Orpheum Annex.

All of the above are first times. First times (that first love and many more firsts) by definition happen only once and if the experience is a pleasant one they can only be topped with new ones.

One who would disagree is La Rêveuse harpsichordist, Bertrand Cuiller who has played versions of tonight’s concert many times. He told me that he never gets bored and every time is almost a first time as he discovers new insights that he might have overlooked in previous concerts.

I am not too sure of this but since I am not a musician I will believe him. I can assert that as a photographer who has taken thousands of photographs, every time I point my camera on a human subject I experience a thrill that almost matches a first time.


Bertrand Cuiller, Florence Bolton, Benjamin Perrot & Jeffrey Thompson


The concert opened with a grand, everybody-on-stage pre-concert talk moderated by Early Music Vancouver Artistic Director MatthewWhite.

Since White is an extremely reputable counter tenor he knows about singers and singing. He can identify with other baroque singers and can ask the right questions or interject with smart stuff.

As I heard this active panel (a super excited Jeffret Thompson) and the more staid Frenchies I thought of Jesuit Pierre Teilhard deChardin’s Phenomenon of Man which I read sometime in 1964 in Buenos Aires. In it Chardin explains how Darwin’s evolution works in a special way. He says that you must picture a dense wall with a small round hole. At the hole you throw a small ball. The chances that the ball will go through it are slim. But if you have a bagful of balls and you throw them all at once a few will get through. Evolutionary progress works in that manner.

In my years in Vancouver I have noticed a steady slide of excellence into mediocrity. You rarely get large examples of passion and virtuosic performance. And when it happens few will be aware as our media has retracted to near oblivion.

I have noticed how Early Music Vancouver, Turning PointEnsemble, the VSO under Branwell Tovey, the Pacific Baroque Orchestra under Alexander Weimann have changed my ill perception of my city’s cultural affairs. Four men, Matthew White, Turning Point’s Owen Underhill, Alexander Weimann and Bramwell Tovey have all thrown lots of balls on that evolutionary hole of excellence.
What has transpired is an anting up of quality and performance. We are getting the best performers from around the world and local musicians, some very good ones are following suit.
In short the musical standards in our city have notched up because these men (and the women who perform in these orchestras) demand perfection.

Last night’s Songs of an English Cavalier was a night that amply proved my suspicions. And before I forget I must add people like Emily Molnar at Ballet BC and Arty Gordon at the Arts Umbrella Dance Company and our theatrical directors like Bill Millerd at the Arts Club Theatre Company and Christopher Gaze at Bard on the Beach who are doing the same anting up at dance and theatre.

Jeffrey Thompson sang like nobody I have ever heard before. He was theatrical, he was lyrical, and he gestured with passion and even shouted some of the lines while his smiles and laughs became contagious. Watching the three French musicians, the elegant harpsichordist, the quietly passionate viola da gambist and the theorboist playing all those favourite grounds (while Thomson rested for his next song (when he sang on his bench it was romantic or sad. When he stood up there were fireworks in the performance).

The panel told us that the English composers (mostly Henry Lawes, 1595 -1662) were at a crossroad between the polyphonic Renaissance period and the monophonic Baroque. Just like other crossroad (transitional) composers like Haydn and Mozart (neither Baroque nor Classical) can be boring if performed in some standard manner, many think that Hawes and company in the same vein. “Not so,” say Mathew White and Jeffrey Thompson. With attitude and passion Hawes and Haydn are exciting and fresh today as when their music was first performed.

To me it is ironical that here we had a concert of rare (to a Vancouver audience) English music played so well by a French group and sung by Rochester-born American Thompson. Part of the irony was explained by Benjamin Perrot who mentioned that the fortunes of lutes and lutenists had suffered a decline in the 17th century in England until it all changed with the arrival of French lutenist Jacques Gaultier to England in 1617. The lute and lute playing became a new craze.

I must point out that rarely can you hear the sounds (the beautiful sounds) of a theorbo (a very big lute) as it is usually drowned out by violins and cellos. But with Cuiller’s laid back harpsichord and Florence Bolton’s viola da gamba (and that special small treble viola da gamba) this was a real trio and  treat to my ears, especially so since I was up front next to the stage.

This first time will have a close second time. As I drive on Sunday morning on my way to photograph virtuoso baroque violinist Monica Huggett in Portland I will be listening to the dynamic quartet's music on my car radio. This second time will be helped by the images of the four as they performed last night. The music will provide me with fine memories. But as John Irving wrote in The World According to Garp, "Imagination is better than memory."

That Frenchman from Calvados, Bertrand Cuiller would smile and agree.








the viola da gamba

The theorbo




The treble viola da gamba


the treble viola da gamba
















Rhododendron augustinii - Not Quite True Blue
Thursday, March 26, 2015


Rhododendron augustinii 'Marion McDonnell'



Garden purists, sometimes called snobs consider that the only colours in a garden should be white or blue. My wife Rosemary was one of those. At one time anything red, orange or yellow was banned from our communal battle-ground garden. Two roses softened her up. One was the very orange Rosa ‘Westerland’ and the yellow single tea rose (single tea roses are snobbish) Rosa ‘Mrs.Oakley Fisher’. 

But remnants for that desire for blue still remain with her. Anybody with a basic knowledge of gardening would know that plants with blue flowers are in short supply. This is why we have aconitums and the difficult to grow Meconopsis betonicifolia  and  delphiniums which need full sun. Full sun is just about disappeared in our garden because our neighbour’s (they rent) encroaching large trees.

There are no rhododendrons that are blue. The closest is Rhododenron augustinii. We have two in our garden that are a variety grown by our friend Alleyne Cook. It is Rhododendron augustinii ‘Marion McDonnell’. McDonnell who died quite a few years ago was also our friend and she grew (to perfection) the famous blue poppy Meconopsis betonicifolia and Meconopsis grandis.

Cooke selected the bluest (or closest to blue) augustinii he could find and renamed it after our famous Vancouver Blue Poppy Lady.





Kyla Gardiner - Theatrical Lighting Director
Wednesday, March 25, 2015

My Mother's Red Shawl - El Rebozo Colorado
Kyla Gardiner - Theatrical Lighting Director





I had a tiny bit of my cervix cut out this morning. It was a preventative procedure to remove pre-cancerous cells. The nurse was very careful to stress that the cells were not cancer. I was a bit sad because I have always been oddly proud of my cervix. I looked forward to the end of a pap smear when the doctor would say, “Looks healthy!” Like when the dental hygienist tells you you’ve been doing a good job flossing, I felt comforted and a bit self-congratulatory. But the last time I had a pap she said, “Looks like high grade dysplasia”, hence the procedure. And I know it’s not directly my fault, but I can’t help but feel as though I should have flossed more.

I can’t think of the red shawl without thinking of mothers, and then my mother and how much I miss her. Particularly on days like today, when I have little bits of my cervix cut off, because that seems like a mom thing. My dad took me to the appointment, which I was very grateful for. And afterwards he asked me if I wanted a coffee, which I did. I didn’t really want to drink the coffee, but I wanted to hold it, and to smell it, and to remember something a barista said to me one rainy morning – that coffee heals the darkness of the pre-dawn.



I have been fantasizing recently of getting away for a bit. In my fantasies I am sitting on a sunny porch gazing across a lake while drinking wine and smoking clove cigarettes like a badass. I am talking to a good friend about a book I just read because I’ve been there long enough to read a whole book. In my fantasy I have a tan and look good in cut-offs, and my friend and I laugh in a worldly way about the sad things. As the evening draws closer it gets a little cold and we grab a blanket or a shawl, it could be the red shawl, to keep us warm. Later, when I am back at home and unpacking things I notice that the shawl smells a little bit like clove cigarettes and reminds me of what a nice time we had.


Curtis Daily - Contrabassist

Bob Mercer – Editor – Musician - Friend

Jorge JoséO'Reilly - Primo/Sobrino - Amigo - Campeón de Rugby

 Art Bergmann Singer-Songwriter- Guitarist

Homero Aridjis Poeta

Zippy Pinhead Musician

Caitlin Legault Art Model

Holly McRea Model - Poet - Creation Conduit.

Lisa Ha Model - Volunteer - Friend

Carmen Alatorre Diseñadora de vestuario

Roberto Baschetti Sociólogo, Investigador Histórico - Amigo

Jennifer Froese Youth Worker

Rachel Cairns Actor

Jennifer Landels Espadachina

Judith Currelly Pilot- Artist

Jim Erickson Set Decorator

Alexandra Hill Soprano

Georgina Elizabeth Isles Figure Model

Emma Middleton Actor

Mark Pryor Author/Lawyer/Assistant DA Travis County TX

Brother Edwin Charles Reggio, CSC Mentor & Teacher

Veronica Vex Burlesque Dancer

George McWhirter Poet

Raúl Guerrero Montemayor Padre-Compadre

Alexandra Waterhouse-Hayward Maestra

Shirley Gnome Singer/Provocateur

Yeva & Thoenn Glover Dancers/Choreographers

JJ Lee Writer

Jacqueline Model

Cathy Marsden Psychiatrist

André De Mondo Wanderer

Colin MacDonald Saxophonist/Composer

Nina Gouveia Yoga Instructor

Stacey Hutton Excercise Physiologist

Colleen Wheeler Actor

Sarah Rodgers Actor, Director,Mother

Tim Turner - Real Estate Agent

Kiera Hill Dancer

Johnna Wright & Sascha Director/Mother - Son/Dreamer

Decker & Nick Hunt Cat & 19th century amateur

George Bowering Poet

Celia Duthie Gallerist

Linda Lorenzo Mother

Katheryn Petersen Accordionist

Stefanie Denz Artist

Ivette Hernández Actress

Byron Chief-Moon Actor/Dancer

Colin Horricks Doctor

Ian Mulgrew Vancouver Sun Columnist

Jocelyn Morlock Composer

Corinne McConchie Librarian

Rachel Ditor Dramaturg

Patrick Reid Statesman, Flag Designer

Michael Varga CBC Cameraman

Bronwen Marsden Playwright/Actress/Director

David Baines Vancouver Sun Columnist

Alex Waterhouse-Hayward Photographer

Lauren Elizabeth Stewart Student

Sandrine Cassini Dancer/Choreographer

Meredith Kalaman Dancer/Choreographer

Juliya Kate Dominatrix



     

Previous Posts
Sandrine Cassini On My Red Psychiatric Couch

The Paris Opera Ballet & Alonso King Lines Ballet

Sandrine Cassini - A Soon-to-be Visit by an Appari...

The Clubhouse On Second

Sound Holes

Faded - Recovered - Scanned - Delight

El Absurdo Infinito

Miss D, My Chickering Baby Grand & Fuji FP-100C

Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín



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1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17