A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

A Pleasant Silent Dialogue @ The Initial Gallery
Saturday, June 20, 2015

Initial Gallery, June 18 2015

I am an amateur of music, dance, theatre, photography and other forms of the arts. I am not an expert nor did I ever study any of the above disciplines. But in using the 19th century (particularly and English one) definition of an amateur I can assert that while I am not an expert in any of them I love them and having seen a lot of it I know a good thing when I see one.

I wrote the above for a recent blog here. I thought it still applies to my reaction this Thursday at the opening of the Bjornson Blandy Carter Collective at the Initial Gallery on 2339 Granville Street. An explanation (of sorts) on the art displayed on the walls of the small gallery is below:

Bjornson Blandy Carter Collective
Verses
June 18 – July 18
Opening reception: Thursday, June 18 6-8 pm

"Early in 2014, we proposed an exhibition of “finished” works in conjunction with pieces recorded during production that may not appear in a “final” image. We recognized that moments occur as we work through our process that may be uniquely developed, fragmented and embellished. The results express past and present “verses’, and are intended to be experienced as separate, albeit related, pieces.

Verses is a continuation of our collective activity. This exhibition was preceded by solo exhibitions of our individual practices. Each show offered insight to the elements that are evident in the collective collaborations, often elusive but present nonetheless, leaving high-energy constructs with many fatalities and injuries. We work within shapes and textures that are only partly our own choice.
By this method we continue to carry on the silent dialogue, weaving together our individual observations, syntheses and responses to existence."

The Bjornson Blandy Carter Collective
The Collective members include Michael Bjornson, Kitty Blandy and Geoff Carter.

Not explained  above is the fact that the most interesting work displayed (all of it) is somehow the work of all three artists Michael Bjornson, Kitty Blandy and Geoff Carter. I was going to ask the silly question, but I didn't dare, “Who begins? Who does the middle part? Who finishes?” This is not their first show with this focus. There were three different ones of which I saw the previous one.

My first reaction to the show was one of unadulterated jealousy as until 2001 I, too did collaborate work with Argentine painters Juan Manuel Sánchez and Nora Patrich. They moved back to Buenos Aires and since then I have felt that I am living in isolation. My photography peers seem to be extremely happy posting to social media photographs taken with their phone. While I do own a digital camera I shoot a lot with film and process my b+w rolls in my darkroom. Again there is this feeling of going at it alone.

The show coincidentally (and by this I mean by sheer coincidence) had three works that featured what looked like a red two-cornered hat.  They reminded me of Napoleon’s hat and the opening, June 18 happened to coincide with the 200th anniversary of his defeat at Waterloo. Also evident in a most whimsical way was the black tail of dog's posterior. The smiles on the three artists reflected a most unstuffy and fun approach to art.


King Wow - microporus polyester film (backlit)

As I enjoyed the show and the milieu (and I don’t drink so I had no wine) I thought that there was an unlikely possibility that I might read about the opening in the media.

In Mexico many refer to their loving partners in affectionate deprecation, “Mi pior es nada.” Pior is a popular derivation of peor ( worse) and the expression means, “My worse than nothing.”
Thinking back to the heady days of arts coverage in our Vancouver Sun (and consider that the Vancouver Province for many years paid Art Perry, now a teacher at Emily Carr, to cover the arts). It is a disgrace that our second daily, that previously-Art Perry-tabloid replaced him with three pages of comics.

One of the critics for the Sun, Michael Scott wrote about the visual arts and about dance. There were rumours that he had been taking courses at Emily Carr to spruce up his arts knowledge. He was controversial (perhaps all arts critics should be so) and was either hated or loved. Once he was let go from the Sun (I don’t know of the circumstances) I asked Lloyd Dykk (the Sun’s classical music critic) for Scott’s whereabouts. His answer was, “I hope he is in the lowest level of Dante’s hell.”


Geoff Carter, Kitty Blandy & Michael Bjornson
I only had one situation, not all too pleasant with Scott. From then copy editor Larry Emeric I had found out that Sun arts writer/editor Max Wyman had a collection of ballerina slippers. I had an idea so I reached Wyman and suggested he write about his dance obsession and that I would illustrate it with my photographs. At the time the Vancouver Sun had a very nice Saturday magazine/sheet. It had replaced the Saturday Review (once edited by Wyman) by Mix, a splendid idea by David Beers who went on to found The Tyee. Wyman and I approached the Entertainment Editor (Scott). If you know anything about Wyman’s professorial presence and his gentle demeanour, you would be floored on how rude the younger man, Scott, dismissed our idea. We waited a few months and we eventually got our way.


For a while after Scott left a pleasant and less controversial Kevin Griffin  took over the beat until the Vancouver Sun put him back as a reporter. Since then the arts have been covered by writers on contract (no dental plans for them so they write with a definite lack of bite). Coverage is sparse and for me inconsequentially boring. There are persistent rumours that the Sun gives arts organizations the choice of either a review or a preview but not both.


So looking back at all that I wonder if the idea that a bad arts critic is a better one than not having one at all?

An idea that failed. 

Looking at the past to defy the present. 

Lloyd Dykk, Larry Emeric's Morgan and Rex Morgan M.D.





A Fine Comedy With No Errors - Sexy, Too!
Friday, June 19, 2015





If you are expecting a short and sweet review of the Bard on the Beach opening of William Shakespeare’s The Comedy of Errors, directed by Scott Bellis on June 13 do not read on. This is going to ramble on.

In 1956 my family and I lived on Calle Shakespeare (corner with Avenida Lafayette) in Colonia Nueva Anzures in Mexico City. We took cabs and we had to pronounce thusly the name of our street –shack –s-phe-ar- eh. My mother thought this very funny and the fact that the complete name of the street was Guillermo Shakespeare. My mother was a snob.

She and my father took me to a theatre in the round production of Bertolt Brecht’s Galileo Galilei in Buenos Aires when I was 8. My father and mother were snobs.

In 1960 my mother took me to an in Spanish production of Oscar Wilde’s Lady Windermere’s Fan in Mexico city with Dolores del Río as top billing. My mother was a snob.

She called herself (and she include me in this) “gente fina”. It translates to a sort of blend between highbrow, well educated and genteel. She even went further by saying there were few people like us around. My mother was a snob.

But to cite a contrarian opinion on this from this erstwhile highbrow I must point out that at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, while the noble people sat in the balconies, the common masses stood in the middle, eating and talking if the play was not to their satisfaction.

The same would apply to opera until late into the mid 19th century. It then became rarefied alongside Mahler and Wagner.

I could also assert that Shakespeare can be “done” anywhere, in the nude, underwater, in any period of history as long as it is not mimed. Shakespeare’s words are essential.

One of the best “partial” productions of Shakespeare’s Henry V happened at the English style The Diner on 10th Avenue 6 years ago. There was a party given by architect Abraham Rogatnick. One of the guests was Christopher Gaze. After a few requests, Gaze stood up and recited (ever so beautifully) Henry V’s St. Crispin’s Day speech. I believe Rogatnick and I had recently seen Gaze as King Lear.

In my total ignorance some 28 years ago I saw a proto-bard-on-the beach production of Richard the III with Gaze. People who were murdered early in the play kept coming back to my total confusion. I did not understand the fine tradition then of frugality in acting. Gaze’s performance was the best Richard III I have ever seen.

An earlier production of The Comedy of Errors, not too many years ago had Gaze dressed in drag as Queen Elizabeth. By then I knew of the confusing gender benders in Shakespeare’s time. My grandmother who wanted to sing opera with her fine coloratura soprano at the end of the 19th century in Spain was not allowed as her father told her that only whores sung in opera.

But by mid 20 century until now, opera, Shakespeare, new/contemporary music, classical music, ballet and the visual arts (with the exception of the almost thriving Vancouver genre called Lowbrow Art) are all seen by many as elitist and are wrapped around that awful word culture. Why would anybody in his or her right mind want to listen to the very fine Paul Kennedy on Ideas on CBC? Could that be why the CBC if falling fast?

Most would agree that culture is good. Many will say that they have little time for it because they are busy. If you live in North Vancouver you have the problem of the bridges. If you live in the outskirts, there is the slowed down freeway or that tunnel.

Our conventional media does not give us “everyman” explanations on pointers to watch out for in a particular play or dance. Reviews are useless if they don’t inspire.

This finally brings me to The Comedy of Errors directed by Scott Bellis. This play has the following little gem:

Antipholus of Syracuse. What is she?

    Dromio of Syracuse. A very reverent body; ay, such a one as a man may
    not speak of without he say 'Sir-reverence.' I have
    but lean luck in the match, and yet is she a
    wondrous fat marriage. 855

    Antipholus of Syracuse. How dost thou mean a fat marriage?

    Dromio of Syracuse. Marry, sir, she's the kitchen wench and all grease;
    and I know not what use to put her to but to make a
    lamp of her and run from her by her own light. I
    warrant, her rags and the tallow in them will burn a 860
    Poland winter: if she lives till doomsday,
    she'll burn a week longer than the whole world.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. What complexion is she of?

    Dromio of Syracuse. Swart, like my shoe, but her face nothing half so
    clean kept: for why, she sweats; a man may go over 865
    shoes in the grime of it.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. That's a fault that water will mend.

    Dromio of Syracuse. No, sir, 'tis in grain; Noah's flood could not do it.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. What's her name?

    Dromio of Syracuse. Nell, sir; but her name and three quarters, that's 870
    an ell and three quarters, will not measure her from
    hip to hip.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. Then she bears some breadth?

    Dromio of Syracuse. No longer from head to foot than from hip to hip:
    she is spherical, like a globe; I could find out 875
    countries in her.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. In what part of her body stands Ireland?

    Dromio of Syracuse. Marry, in her buttocks: I found it out by the bogs.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. Where Scotland?

    Dromio of Syracuse. I found it by the barrenness; hard in the palm of the hand. 880

    Antipholus of Syracuse. Where France?

    Dromio of Syracuse. In her forehead; armed and reverted, making war
    against her heir.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. Where England?

    Dromio of Syracuse. I looked for the chalky cliffs, but I could find no 885
    whiteness in them; but I guess it stood in her chin,
    by the salt rheum that ran between France and it.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. Where Spain?

    Dromio of Syracuse. Faith, I saw it not; but I felt it hot in her breath.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. Where America, the Indies? 890

    Dromio of Syracuse. Oh, sir, upon her nose all o'er embellished with
    rubies, carbuncles, sapphires, declining their rich
    aspect to the hot breath of Spain; who sent whole
    armadoes of caracks to be ballast at her nose.

    Antipholus of Syracuse. Where stood Belgia, the Netherlands? 895

    Dromio of Syracuse. Oh, sir, I did not look so low. To conclude, this
    drudge, or diviner, laid claim to me, call'd me
    Dromio; swore I was assured to her; told me what
    privy marks I had about me, as, the mark of my
    shoulder, the mole in my neck, the great wart on my 900
    left arm, that I amazed ran from her as a witch:
    And, I think, if my breast had not been made of
    faith and my heart of steel,
    She had transform'd me to a curtal dog and made
    me turn i' the wheel.


The above is rendered intact in this Comedy of Errors with Ben Elliot as Antipholus of Syracuse and Luisa Jocic as Dromio of Syracuse.

To me this little dialogue has shades of my Spanish grandmother who used to recite El Quijote to me instead of telling me I had done something wrong. I did not know then that they were aphorisms, courtesy of Sancho Panza. My grandmother would say she had to go to the doctor because she was not well in “los paises bajos,” or lower countries. I have no idea if there is a tradition that may have begun with Shakespeare’s citing of Belgia and the Netherlands for women’s ills and parts down there.

Bellis’s The Comedy of Errors has Shakespeare’s words (almost) intact. There is one whopper “okay.” I asked Bellis after the performance and he told me that when it was first said nobody complained so it was left.

So if you listen to The Comedy of Errors it is Shakespeare at its best. There is no complaint from this erstwhile highbrow.

But if your eyes are wide open then the show has an additional wow factor (I will do my best not to use the word mentioned by so many reviewers) as the play is set in an alternative history/universe of the 19th century. If you want a further explanation look here.

To those who some years may have seen ( I went twice it was that good) the Electric Theatre Company’s production of Studies in Motion – The Hauntings of Eadweard Muybridge which was choreographed from beginning to end by CrystalPite there is now a fine tradition in this city for choreographed plays. The choreographer here is Tara Cheyenne Friedenberg. I must digress here to say that she once appeared in Dances for a Small Stage as a mermaid (complete with fish tail!) and her performance on the stage floor involved only movements from the waist up.

In short this Comedy of Errors is a whopping visual delight that does what more Shakespeare should do. This is to make it accessible to the uninitiated youth and the not so youthful uninitiated. I mentioned this to Bellis whose reply was one word, “Bingo!”

I cannot write more eloquently about the fine acting but I must point out two fine performances and one more.

The first two are Ben Elliott as Antipholus of Syracuse (to be fair his part has juicier lines to Jay Hindle’s Antipholus of Ephesus). After having seen him in A Broken Sex Doll at the Cultch a few years ago I know he has a fine eye for babes. And in this Comedy of Errors he gets the babe. More on her later.

The real fantastic actress (an actor who is really played by an old fashioned actress who is playing an actress playing an actor) is Dawn Petten. She is  the only local theatrical performer ( to avoid that actor/actress muddle) who could make more money between plays in a Joe-Job as a stand-up comic. She is terrific. Petten has that instinctive talent of knowing when to talk and when not to.

In the beginning of the play she wheels in a scooter (the ones that were the rage some years ago. When she gets off she maneuvers into place a miniature kick stand. The audience roared. I asked Petten about the kick stand. I am happy to report that this was her contribution.

Now to the more difficult but perhaps more fun mention of that third performer. That is Lindsey Angell (the babe who falls for Antipholus of Syracuse) who plays Luciana sister to Adriana, Sereana Malani.

Costume Designer Mara Gottler in a dream appeared to me and asked me, “What would you like me to do with Angell?” I told her, "Dress her up to look like an alternative history librarian with glasses and a short skirt so I can see those legs and more from here to Elsinore. Make sure she is wearing fishnets. I want to be able to go to the front desk of her library and ask her, ‘Do you have a copy of Lady Chatterley’s Lover? (in an alternative universe D.H. Lawrence would have written it in the 19th century)’”

Had Bellis showed up in that dream, too, I would have said to him, “Make sure she has a cutesy voice like my Rosemary’s when she talks to her cat Casi-Casi.” When she first appears on stage with those round and dark horned-rimmed glasses (and those fishnets) my heart accelerated and I noted a stirring in The Hague.

This Comedy of Errors is fun, still Shakespeare, interesting to watch and best of all, sexy.  My mother who was a snob would have liked it.

In an alternative universe Bard on the Beach would stage The Taming of the Shrew like this: Katherina would be Lindsey Angell and Petruchio Dawn Petten. Imagine that!


No Vancouver summer is so unless it is a warm night and you are walking back to your car after a fine performance at Bard on the Beach. This June 13 wasn't as warm as I would have wanted to but I know that it will be so when we go this Friday to King Lear.



A Gentle Prod To Ballet BC From A Dance Amateur (That's Me)
Thursday, June 18, 2015


Nicole Ward, Albert Galindo - Photograph Alex Waterhouse-Hayward


I am an amateur of music, dance, theatre, photography and other forms of the arts. I am not an expert nor did I ever study any of the above disciplines. But in using the 19th century (particularly and English one) definition of an amateur I can assert that while I am not an expert in any of them I love them and having seen a lot of it I know a good thing when I see one.

Since December 1995 when I first saw Evelyn Hart dance I became interested in dance. Through assignments from the Globe & Mail, the Georgia Straight and a shooting-star of a magazine called VLM (run by another amateur, editor Bob Mercer) I have been to a lot of dance and seen many dancers and photographed a legion of them. I have been reading NY Times Dance Critic Alastair Macauley for 15 years in my daily delivered (hard copy) NY Times.



Of late living in a city where the laid back lifestyle promotes lazy mediocrity I have been near-obsessed with the dancers and the dance program of the Arts Umbrella Dance Company. There is none (of that mediocrity) to be found there.

My eldest granddaughter (now 17) danced there for five years and quit (perhaps because of a lack of encouragement from her parents). We pressured her to then go to a school on 4th Avenue and both my Rosemary and I were appalled at the lack of professionalism of the institution which was an amateur (the bad meaning of the word) fly-by-night operation. Without proper and insistent prodding my granddaughter finally quit for good.

My younger granddaughter, 12, has been dancing now at Arts Umbrella for five years and I must admit that there is a tad more parental encouragement.

John Alleyne, right, left Todd Woffinden & Crystal Pite - Photograph Alex Waterhouse-Hayward

I am happy about this because the Arts Umbrella Dance Company promotes excellence and they push their dancers beyond high-school dance standards. Any program produced by the Granville Island-based company is sure to be exhilarating one. I remember one in particular. I wrote about it here. I finished that blog with a gentle prod in the direction of then Ballet BC Artistic Director, John Alleyne. I did not mention in the blog that Alleyne was present (at the back row) at that Playhouse performance and that on my way out I went up to him and directly mentioned Alexander Burton and Alyson Fretz.

To my surprise both were shortly hired by Ballet BC for that coming dance year.
In that spirit I again write this blog gently prodding the powers that be at Ballet BC (yes, Emily Molnar that’s you)  that Spanish-born Albert Galindo and Nicole Ward should be immediately swooshed into the company.

I remember so fondly the first time I saw Emily Molnar dance with Ballet BC. She had come from William Forsythe’s legendary Ballet Frankfurt (and sort of changed directions with Crystal Pite who had left Ballet BC for Ballet Frankfurt).

 Even as the amateur that I am I know that there are two qualities that dancers must have. One, obviously is skill and grace. The second quality is more in the realm of something you cannot quite touch but you will know it’s there when you see it. Molnar on stage had presence.


Nicole Ward - Photograph Alex Waterhouse-Hayward
She was close to 6ft tall and in one of those early performances she wore a blood-red dress. Dance critics of the time (worse now) were too politically correct (not willing to offend) to mention that here was a very tall woman with a body in proportion to her height. It is my guess (I never asked Alleyne) that only one male dancer in the company could lift her. This was Edmund Kilpatrick. I further guess that when Alleyne choreographed for the company he had to consider Molnar’s size. Since then as they say the rest is history. I feel awfully lucky to have had the privilege to see this dance luminary dance.

Now both Albert Galindo and Nicole Ward are skilled. Skilled, because they have been through the training of all those Arts Umbrella instructors including Artemis Gordon. But I must point out that this pair have a presence in spades. Both are tall. In particular I see Ward as a proto-Emily Molnar.

So, from this amateur to you folks in Ballet BC (and yes, that’s you Emily Molnar) there is this gentle prod that you should scoop up the pair before someone else does.



Summer Solstice At Mountain View Cemetery
Wednesday, June 17, 2015



Marina Hasselberg & Pancho

I am not one of those persons (I was never a flower child) to celebrate either the equinoxes or the solstices. But I am going to make it an exception this coming Sunday the 21st. I am going to attend at least one (there are two one, at 7pm and the other at 9pm and they run for 23 minutes) of the performances sponsored by the Little Chamber Music Series That Could at the Mountain View Cemetery on 41st Avenue and Fraser.

Among the musicians that are playing I know three of them Adrian Verdejo guitar, Marina Hasselberg cello and Mark Haney double bass. The vocalist is, Sarah Wheeler.

Verdejo, a guitarist from Mexico (his father is my rheumatologist) could be seen as vaguely funereal in his handsomeness. And Marina Hasselberg is bound to be dressed in black and will surely wear fishnets.

There will be dancers too. And the price of admission, is a fave of this 21st century. It is free.



Dahl's House - June 11 2015 - Arts Umbrella Dance Company
Tuesday, June 16, 2015


A Work In Progress (More Photographs to come)

I have spent a couple of days selecting (cropping and fixing) 100 photographs from 600. My pupils are rectangular. I have decided to post these 100 and add the rest in the next few days. Those who will look at these 100 might want to return here in a few days to see more.

 
Vancouver Playhouse - June 11 2015



Photography was never an easy profession and for years in my pursuit of establishing myself as a magazine photographer I had to find and master different versions of what I thought defined a magazine photographer.

All that  and in this 21st century with magazines being moribund I basked in memories of that past in which I was paid to go to Europe, Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, Florida, across Canada and the former Yugoslavia. I was settled in  “this is what I used to do” thing until it all changed on January 19, 2014 at the Q7 dance studio of the Arts Umbrella Dance Company. Armed with a camera that my Rosemary had urged me to buy, a Fuji X-E1 I discovered my own personal way of recording dance.
On June 11, 2015 I photographed the day’s rehearsals at the Vancouver Playhouse and the first of the Arts Umbrella Dance Company final performances for this dance school year. It was called Dahl’s House and the dance pieces involving the very young and the graduates had to do with the whimsical elements of Roald Dahl’s novels.



For me it was a bittersweet experience as I noted the black graduate T-shirts of the dancers soon-to-depart to dance companies around the world. It was bittersweet for me (I wrote about it here) because I felt that in some way beginning in January 2014 I, too, had signed up for dance school. My beginning was exciting and I soon thought I had perfected my style. I soon found out the limitations of my camera. Or it simply might be my inability to adapt to it. These final pictures leave me cold. There are a few good ones but I know what they could have been and are not.

There is hope, of course. Unlike the graduate students who now have to seriously be professional in their chosen fields I can still imagine that what I am doing (and I hope I will be able to do in next year’s crop of Arts Umbrella dancers) will still be fun, challenging and enthralling.










































































































     

Previous Posts
Inertia

Beyond the Grave - A Posthumous Gift

Pathos With Kokoro at the Roundhouse

That Female Angel

Figurative Art - An Obsession

Embryotrophic Cavatina - Requiem For My Friend

The Man From Pittsburg Almost Made Me Smile

Giclée in French Slang means...

Fairwell French Style - Not

Tickling the Ivories



Archives
1/15/06 - 1/22/06

1/22/06 - 1/29/06

1/29/06 - 2/5/06

2/5/06 - 2/12/06

2/12/06 - 2/19/06

2/19/06 - 2/26/06

2/26/06 - 3/5/06

3/5/06 - 3/12/06

3/12/06 - 3/19/06

3/19/06 - 3/26/06

3/26/06 - 4/2/06

4/2/06 - 4/9/06

4/9/06 - 4/16/06

4/16/06 - 4/23/06

4/23/06 - 4/30/06

4/30/06 - 5/7/06

5/7/06 - 5/14/06

5/14/06 - 5/21/06

5/21/06 - 5/28/06

5/28/06 - 6/4/06

6/4/06 - 6/11/06

6/11/06 - 6/18/06

6/18/06 - 6/25/06

6/25/06 - 7/2/06

7/2/06 - 7/9/06

7/9/06 - 7/16/06

7/16/06 - 7/23/06

7/23/06 - 7/30/06

7/30/06 - 8/6/06

8/6/06 - 8/13/06

8/13/06 - 8/20/06

8/20/06 - 8/27/06

8/27/06 - 9/3/06

9/3/06 - 9/10/06

9/10/06 - 9/17/06

9/17/06 - 9/24/06

9/24/06 - 10/1/06

10/1/06 - 10/8/06

10/8/06 - 10/15/06

10/15/06 - 10/22/06

10/22/06 - 10/29/06

10/29/06 - 11/5/06

11/5/06 - 11/12/06

11/12/06 - 11/19/06

11/19/06 - 11/26/06

11/26/06 - 12/3/06

12/3/06 - 12/10/06

12/10/06 - 12/17/06

12/17/06 - 12/24/06

12/24/06 - 12/31/06

12/31/06 - 1/7/07

1/7/07 - 1/14/07

1/14/07 - 1/21/07

1/21/07 - 1/28/07

1/28/07 - 2/4/07

2/4/07 - 2/11/07

2/11/07 - 2/18/07

2/18/07 - 2/25/07

2/25/07 - 3/4/07

3/4/07 - 3/11/07

3/11/07 - 3/18/07

3/18/07 - 3/25/07

3/25/07 - 4/1/07

4/1/07 - 4/8/07

4/8/07 - 4/15/07

4/15/07 - 4/22/07

4/22/07 - 4/29/07

4/29/07 - 5/6/07

5/6/07 - 5/13/07

5/13/07 - 5/20/07

5/20/07 - 5/27/07

5/27/07 - 6/3/07

6/3/07 - 6/10/07

6/10/07 - 6/17/07

6/17/07 - 6/24/07

6/24/07 - 7/1/07

7/1/07 - 7/8/07

7/8/07 - 7/15/07

7/15/07 - 7/22/07

7/22/07 - 7/29/07

7/29/07 - 8/5/07

8/5/07 - 8/12/07

8/12/07 - 8/19/07

8/19/07 - 8/26/07

8/26/07 - 9/2/07

9/2/07 - 9/9/07

9/9/07 - 9/16/07

9/16/07 - 9/23/07

9/23/07 - 9/30/07

9/30/07 - 10/7/07

10/7/07 - 10/14/07

10/14/07 - 10/21/07

10/21/07 - 10/28/07

10/28/07 - 11/4/07

11/4/07 - 11/11/07

11/11/07 - 11/18/07

11/18/07 - 11/25/07

11/25/07 - 12/2/07

12/2/07 - 12/9/07

12/9/07 - 12/16/07

12/16/07 - 12/23/07

12/23/07 - 12/30/07

12/30/07 - 1/6/08

1/6/08 - 1/13/08

1/13/08 - 1/20/08

1/20/08 - 1/27/08

1/27/08 - 2/3/08

2/3/08 - 2/10/08

2/10/08 - 2/17/08

2/17/08 - 2/24/08

2/24/08 - 3/2/08

3/2/08 - 3/9/08

3/9/08 - 3/16/08

3/16/08 - 3/23/08

3/23/08 - 3/30/08

3/30/08 - 4/6/08

4/6/08 - 4/13/08

4/13/08 - 4/20/08

4/20/08 - 4/27/08

4/27/08 - 5/4/08

5/4/08 - 5/11/08

5/11/08 - 5/18/08

5/18/08 - 5/25/08

5/25/08 - 6/1/08

6/1/08 - 6/8/08

6/8/08 - 6/15/08

6/15/08 - 6/22/08

6/22/08 - 6/29/08

6/29/08 - 7/6/08

7/6/08 - 7/13/08

7/13/08 - 7/20/08

7/20/08 - 7/27/08

7/27/08 - 8/3/08

8/3/08 - 8/10/08

8/10/08 - 8/17/08

8/17/08 - 8/24/08

8/24/08 - 8/31/08

8/31/08 - 9/7/08

9/7/08 - 9/14/08

9/14/08 - 9/21/08

9/21/08 - 9/28/08

9/28/08 - 10/5/08

10/5/08 - 10/12/08

10/12/08 - 10/19/08

10/19/08 - 10/26/08

10/26/08 - 11/2/08

11/2/08 - 11/9/08

11/9/08 - 11/16/08

11/16/08 - 11/23/08

11/23/08 - 11/30/08

11/30/08 - 12/7/08

12/7/08 - 12/14/08

12/14/08 - 12/21/08

12/21/08 - 12/28/08

12/28/08 - 1/4/09

1/4/09 - 1/11/09

1/11/09 - 1/18/09

1/18/09 - 1/25/09

1/25/09 - 2/1/09

2/1/09 - 2/8/09

2/8/09 - 2/15/09

2/15/09 - 2/22/09

2/22/09 - 3/1/09

3/1/09 - 3/8/09

3/8/09 - 3/15/09

3/15/09 - 3/22/09

3/22/09 - 3/29/09

3/29/09 - 4/5/09

4/5/09 - 4/12/09

4/12/09 - 4/19/09

4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17