A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Bass For Bach & A Manly Apollo
Saturday, March 19, 2016

Douglas Williams - bass-baritone , Curtis Daily - bassist

At one time I would have questioned my feelings, the feelings that rushed in at the Early Music Vancouver presentation of the Pacific Baroque Orchestra’s production of George Frederic Handel’s Apollo E Dafne.

In the past my feelings would have rejected any admiration to a good looking and very manly man, Douglas Williams, baritone.

My Argentine/Mexican macho approach to everything began to crumble when I photographed local punk guitar virtuoso and songwriter Art Bergmann and I noticed that what I thought was a hidden female side of me suddenly came forward and I found Bergmann attractive as a man from a female point of view. I must say it was liberating to abandon my machismo.




It got better (worse?) when I attended a performance (5 years ago) of the Arts Umbrella Dance Company and someone I knew asked me why I was there. My answer, “To see the boys,” put him off and he wandered away.

So I must then point out most vehemently that Friday night’s Apollo & Dafne at the Vancouver Playhouse had me with eyes only for the tall, handsome  bass-baritone Douglas Williams whom I had seen before here. In the pre-concert talk his voice projection was marvellous and I could only think that he could never have been hired by the CBC as he had no speech impediment or lisp.

Douglas Williams was the perfect Apollo and Yulia Van Doren, soprano was a most believable Dafne who in the end feels sorrow for her rejection of the macho god. This was not a staged little opera but the two singers with gestures and facial expressions and Williams’s ability to raise his left eyebrow and the right one at will, too provided all I needed to be immersed in the story.

Alex Weimann Artistic Director PBO ,Yulia Van Doren soprano & Douglas Williams bass-baritone

But it was in the first part of the program, Johann Sebastian Bach’s Orchestral Suite No. 1 in C major, in the Ouverture where from our seats, third row and slightly stage left, that I noticed a sound I had never heard before. It was a wonderful rumble of bass sound.

Now, I am not a fan of the modern obsession with enhanced bass. I have always  had a preference for what I call accurate sound. This Bach Orchestral Suite was just different and a most pleasant surprise.

I could not believe the depth of sound which contrasted with the lively (almost trumpet-like) sounds of Matthew Jennejohn and Curtis Foster’s oboes and the upper register of the violins. And not to be overlooked is young oboe virtuoso Curtis Foster. His tocayo confirmed my amateur appraisal. I wondered about John Lenti's theorbo. I finally know that the difference between his instrument and the already long archlute is an extra half foot (at least).

At the interval I was chatting with EMV donors Vic and Joan Baker. My friend (and house guest) Curtis Daily, Portland Baroque Orchestra member “seconded” to the night’s performance to play his baroque bass showed up. I introduced him to the Bakers and Vic Baker said, “I have never heard such a bass sound in Bach.”

After the concert I snapped pictures of Daily and Williams in Williams’s dressing room. I had to sit him down because of his height. I mentioned his rising eyebrow. I was rewarded with, “My mother has told me that the first thing she noticed when I was born was my raised left eyebrow.”

Apollo
There was one more notable male in the program besides Daily and Williams. This was Craig Tomlinson’s harpsichord (a single-manual one) which was recently purchased by EMV and this was its inaugural concert. I asked Tomlinson if the instrument was a woman or a man. He immediately answered, “It’s a man.”

But before I leave you to Curtis Daily’s explanation on the bass sound I heard I have to reveal the presence of a couple of notable women. Daily’s bass is called Emelia. I have no idea if Natalie Mackie’s violone is a guy or a gal but I can assure you that Mackie is one hell of a woman. In Daily’s essay he mentions the interaction between his bass and Mackie’s violone.


Alex asked me to write about the sonic relationship of the violone and contrabass for his blog post about the concert that PBO performed Friday night at Vancouver Playhouse.

I had a lot of time to think about what I might write about during the long drive back to Portland and a couple of things stuck in my head; my first year music theory class, and peanut butter and honey sandwiches.

I know Alex is going to write something about enhanced bass with regards to this concert, so I’m going to use this opportunity to first offer a brief commentary about the luxuriously large bass group.

I have to state first that the musicians of PBO are among the best anywhere and it’s an incredible joy to make music with them. In the PBO bass group there were seven instruments in all, in three sub-groups; two chordal instruments with different timbres (theorbo and harpsichord), two different types of bass instruments that play the bass line at actual pitch and usually play single notes (cello and bassoon), also with different timbres, and last but not least, two lower bass instruments (small violone pitched in G, and contrabass) that play all or most of their notes an octave below what is written in the music. Strictly speaking, the contrabass is also a violone and the violone is also a contrabass, but for the sake of clarity I will use the familiar names. These two instruments also have different timbres. I’ll explain about timbre below for those readers who aren’t familiar with the term, but what this means for the listener is that the various combinations of bass instruments in the PBO continuo group can offer a wide variety of sonic effects in the bass register, depending on how they are combined. Usually there is nothing specific written in the music about how to combine the instruments, so we make these decisions ourselves in order to best emphasize the emotional qualities of the music.

Craig Tomlinson's harpsichord, Natalie Mackie & Curtis Daily

On to the essay….

I attended Mt. Hood Community College in Gresham, OR,  for two years beginning in 1979.

In addition to schooling students in auto body repair and other practical skills, MHCC had an excellent music department. This is where I learned how to play the contrabass, studying with Mr. Zgonc. Mr. Zgonc also taught music theory and I attended his classes. Among the many interesting things I learned there were “The Four Properties of a Tone”.  These are Pitch, Intensity, Duration, and Timbre.  We’ll look at these properties with respect to the relationship of the violone and the contrabass.

Pitch:
Pitch is the frequency of a tone in cycles per second.
When the violone and the contrabass play together, they play a note of the same pitch and almost always in the same octave. Because the violone has frets, its pitch is fixed. Therefore the contrabassist, lacking frets, always tries to match the pitch of the contrabass to the pitch of the violone, and that tonal unity creates a strong foundation for the rest of the orchestra to place their pitches.

Intensity:
The intensity of a tone is mostly about volume. Due to its smaller size, the violone can play more quietly than the contrabass, but cannot play as loudly.

Duration:
Duration is how long a tone lasts. Both the violone and contrabass have the ability to play very long and very short tones when using the bow, as well as short, more percussive tones that naturally decay, when plucking the strings with the fingers.

Timbre:
Timbre refers to the sonic personality of a tone, and is the heart of the matter for this essay.

Though they look similar, the violone, because of its relatively small sound box, gut frets, and low string tension, has a distinctly different timbre than that of the contrabass, with its large sound box, high string tension, and lack of frets.

The small sound box and gut frets of the violone create a sound that has more high overtones than the contrabass, What this sounds like to the listener is a highly focused and direct bass sound with a distinctly vocal quality.

The contrabass, on the other hand, with its larger sound box, highly tensioned strings, and fretless fingerboard, produces timbres that are very deep and often boomy when played loudly. It does not have a distinct vocal quality except when heard at close range, and in many halls it only sounds deep, lacking a distinct timbre.

When both instruments are played simultaneously, a range of timbres can be produced due to their complementary characteristics. In loud passages the violone still has a pointed and distinct sound while the contrabass offers a deeper timbre. When they play quietly the violone retains its clear voice while the contrabass voice takes on a velvety quality. 


Natalie Mackie
 Among the many things I look forward to when playing with PBO, one is that I will be playing with Natalie Mackie, a wonderful multi-instrumentalist who usually plays her violone in PBO performances. When I play with Natalie, I have freedom to use the contrabass for what it is best at; emphasizing the rhythmic parts of the bass line, and using the more powerful sound to add dramatic effect at times. Ideally they will sound like one instrument that has the best qualities of both.

To occupy part of the 7 hour drive home, I was trying to come up with a simile that might assist the reader in appreciating the relationship of the small violone and contrabass. This is probably just going to seem silly, but for me it is something like a peanut butter and honey sandwich. The violone is the honey and the contrabass is the peanut butter. They have some similar qualities and I like both well enough by themselves, but they are especially nice when stirred together.




The singers' shoes
A coda by Curtis Daily



The Perplexing Redness Of Its Red
Friday, March 18, 2016





Different forms of Spanish are spoken around the world. Castilian Spanish, the Spaniards and the Argentines, call it castellano. Other countries, including Mexico opt for español. In Spanish be it Castilian or Spanish, languages are not capitalized. The same applies to the days of the week and the months of the year.

Argentines don’t like to use the word rojo for red. They consider that word ordinary and prefer the older colorado which explains the original name of the American state of Colorado.
Strictly speaking colorado means in colour and not red but that has been forgotten. Colorado is red.

When I used to read fairy stories  to my daughters in Spanish I would finish the evening with “Colorín colorado este cuento se ha acabado.” (this story is now finished).


As a very young boy my favourite colour was azúl or blue. With so much of it (and gray and green) in Vancouver I now really like ochre. 

We recently had our psychiatric couch (which is in our piano room) re-coveree to vermillion. In Spanish that’s bermejo.

In one of the few poems where the elegant Jorge Luís Borges has mentioned red he applies it to the strange fact that red roses are still called roses.


La Lluvia – Jorge Luís Borges



Bruscamente la tarde se ha aclarado

Porque ya cae la lluvia minuciosa.

Cae o cayó. La lluvia es una cosa

Que sin duda sucede en el pasado.



Quien la oye caer ha recobrado

El tiempo en que la suerte venturosa

Le reveló una flor llamada rosa

Y el curioso color del colorado.



Esta lluvia que ciega los cristales

Alegrará en perdidos arrabales

Las negras uvas de una parra en cierto



Patio que ya no existe. La mojada

Tarde me trae la voz, la voz deseada,

De mi padre que vuelve y que no ha muerto.


Rain
By Jorge Luis Borges

Translated by A.Z. Foreman



The afternoon has brightened up at last

For rain is falling, sudden and minute.

Falling or fallen. There is no dispute:

Rain is a thing that happens in the past.



Who hears it fall retrieves a time that fled

When an uncanny windfall could disclose

To him a flower by the name of rose

And the perplexing redness of its red.



Falling until it blinds each windowpane,

Within a suburb now long lost this rain

Shall liven black grapes on a vine inside



A certain patio that is no more.

A long-awaited voice through the downpour

Is from my father. He has nevee died.



Cherry Pink & Hosta Blue
Thursday, March 17, 2016






With Spring here and I as I look out from my oficina window onto the little garden I grieve at plants lost but happy to see some plants retained.

I am ambivalent about the ornamental (a very old one) cherry tree in our Athlone garden. It was beautiful but at this time of the year the incessant rain would make the blossoms fall. They would fall on the leaves of my emerging blue hostas. Blue hostas are blue because they have a coating or indumentum that some say protect the leaves from UV burn. When these blue hostas are photographed with film cameras and digital cameras (both are sensitive to UV) the results show plants that are much bluer than they really are. With such tricks nurseries lure garden owners to ooh! and aah! and drop lots of money for these blue fakers.

Those of us who have grown hostas for some time know that you never touch the blue coating or spray the leaves with a strong hose. This removes the indumentum and the blueness will disappear until the next season.

Which brings me to the cherry tree. Those blossoms fall on the leaves and unless they are gingerly picked they leave stains on the leaves.

This year I will not have that problem. And yet those cherry blossoms held by Kathryn  on my studio psychiatric couch bring fond memories of a garden past.



A Light Exists In Spring
Wednesday, March 16, 2016





A LIGHT exists in spring
  Not present on the year     
At any other period.
  When March is scarcely here    
 
A color stands abroad           
  On solitary hills    
That silence cannot overtake,    
  But human nature feels.    
 
It waits upon the lawn;  
  It shows the furthest tree           
Upon the furthest slope we know;    
  It almost speaks to me.     
 
Then, as horizons step, 
  Or noons report away,
Without the formula of sound,            
  It passes, and we stay:
 
A quality of loss
  Affecting our content, 
As trade had suddenly encroached   
  Upon a sacrament.        

Emily Dickinson








The lady dare not lift her veil
 I took my power in my hand
 I find my feet have further goals
 I cannot dance upon my toes
The Music of the Violin does not emerge alone
Red Blaze 
He touched me, so I live to know
Rear Window- The Entering Takes Away
Said Death to Passion
 We Wear the Mask That Grins And Lies
It was not death for I stood alone
The Music in the Violin Does Not Emerge Alone
I tend my flowers for thee
Lavinia Norcross Dickinson
Pray gather me anemone! 
Ample make her bed
His caravan of red 
Me-come! My dazzled face  
Develops pearl and weed

But peers beyond her mesh
Surgeons must be very careful
Water is taught by thirst
I could not prove that years had feet
April played her fiddle
A violin in Baize replaced
I think the longest hour
The spirit lasts
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/03/i-left-them-in-ground-emily-dickinson.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/01/i-felt-my-life-with-both-my-hands.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/currer-bell-emily-dickinson-charlotte.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/and-zero-at-bone-with-dirks-of-melody.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/05/charm-invests-her-face.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/i-could-not-see-to-see.html 
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/blonde-assasin-passes-on.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2012/12/you-almost-bathed-your-tongue.html



The Lady Dare Not Lift Her Veil
Tuesday, March 15, 2016






A CHARM invests a face

Imperfectly beheld,—    

The lady dare not lift her veil    

For fear it be dispelled. 

 

But peers beyond her mesh,             

And wishes, and denies,—  

Lest interview annul a want

That image satisfies.

Emily Dickinson


 I took my power in my hand
 I find my feet have further goals
 I cannot dance upon my toes
The Music of the Violin does not emerge alone
Red Blaze 
He touched me, so I live to know
Rear Window- The Entering Takes Away
Said Death to Passion
 We Wear the Mask That Grins And Lies
It was not death for I stood alone
The Music in the Violin Does Not Emerge Alone
I tend my flowers for thee
Lavinia Norcross Dickinson
Pray gather me anemone! 
Ample make her bed
His caravan of red 
Me-come! My dazzled face  
Develops pearl and weed

But peers beyond her mesh
Surgeons must be very careful
Water is taught by thirst
I could not prove that years had feet
April played her fiddle
A violin in Baize replaced
I think the longest hour
The spirit lasts
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/03/i-left-them-in-ground-emily-dickinson.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/01/i-felt-my-life-with-both-my-hands.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/currer-bell-emily-dickinson-charlotte.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/and-zero-at-bone-with-dirks-of-melody.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/i-could-not-see-to-see.html 
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/blonde-assasin-passes-on.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2012/12/you-almost-bathed-your-tongue.html



     

Previous Posts
Miss D, My Chickering Baby Grand & Fuji FP-100C

Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín

From Simple To Complex

Leaning Towards Irrelevancy

Nevertheless She Persisted - For Allan Morgan - My...

El Reloj de Arena - The Hour Glass - Jorge Luís Bo...

An Officer and a Gentleman & An Anniversary

el ayelmado tripolio que ademenos es de satén rosa...

For Susanne Tabata's Media Class At the Art Instit...



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1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

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3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

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4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

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5/22/11 - 5/29/11

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7/3/11 - 7/10/11

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11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

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12/4/11 - 12/11/11

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12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

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2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

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3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

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4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

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8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

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9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

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3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

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4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

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6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

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7/21/13 - 7/28/13

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8/11/13 - 8/18/13

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8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

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9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

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10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

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4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

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5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

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11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

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3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

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4/19/15 - 4/26/15

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9/20/15 - 9/27/15

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10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

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3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

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4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

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7/3/16 - 7/10/16

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7/24/16 - 7/31/16

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9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

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11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17