A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Lisa Ha - Model - Volunteer - Friend
Saturday, February 22, 2014

My Mother's Red Shawl - El Rebozo Colorado
Lisa Ha - Model - Volunteer - Friend






The night I was modeling for this shoot I was going on a first date with Jonathan to a restaurant called Dark table. It was my first date with him. First dates are really awkward for me. I get really nervous and I feel like I don’t know what to say to them. It’s the first chance you get to make the first impression.

Jonathan and I chatted and got to know each other before we set a date to meet. I let him choose the restaurant for dinner. He wasn’t going to tell me where we were going until that morning. In the morning I checked in with him to see where we were going for dinner. He told me the Dark Table. I let out a really loud giggle.

We met up for coffee first before dinner to actually see what we looked like before dinner.

Dark Table is a restaurant where it is completely dark inside. You are served by servers who are blind. You order your food outside and you are led in the restaurant by your server.

I giggled because it is a really interesting choice for a first date. On a first date I usually make my judgment of them by making eye contact with my date, watching his facial expressions and body language. At a restaurant, I also can see how my date treats our server. It’s important to me how they treat the server because it shows me how they deal with other people. I can also see if they have a wandering eye. Sometimes other things in the room catch their eye like, other woman or the decor of the room. You can see what they are paying attention to (if it is not you) It is easier to plan your escape route if the date isn’t going well. At Dark Table, I couldn’t do any of that. I could not tell if wandered. Both of us could not see anything. The only thing we could do was to talk to each other the whole time.

Come to think of it, having our first date at Dark Table was a brilliant idea. We both had to turn our cell phones off before going into the restaurant. That meant no cell phone distraction from either party. We sat in complete darkness so we had to converse with each other. We tried each other’s drink. We had to say which side our drink was on so we could pass the drink to each other without spilling anything. I had to focus on our conversation. I couldn’t make judgment on him about what he was wearing or his body language. There was no wandering eye for both parties on who else was in the restaurant or how pretty the decor was.


Carmen Alatorre Diseñadora de vestuario

Roberto Baschetti Sociólogo, Investigador Histórico - Amigo

Jennifer Froese Youth Worker

Rachel Cairns Actor

Jennifer Landels Espadachina

Judith Currelly Pilot- Artist

Jim Erickson Set Decorator

Alexandra Hill Soprano

Georgina Elizabeth Isles Figure Model

Emma Middleton Actor

Mark Pryor Author/Lawyer/Assistant DA Travis County TX

Brother Edwin Charles Reggio, CSC Mentor & Teacher

Veronica Vex Burlesque Dancer

George McWhirter Poet

Raúl Guerrero Montemayor Padre-Compadre

Alexandra Waterhouse-Hayward Maestra

Shirley Gnome Singer/Provocateur

Yeva & Thoenn Glover Dancers/Choreographers

JJ Lee Writer

Jacqueline Model

Cathy Marsden Psychiatrist

André De Mondo Wanderer

Colin MacDonald Saxophonist/Composer

Nina Gouveia Yoga Instructor

Stacey Hutton Excercise Physiologist

Colleen Wheeler Actor

Sarah Rodgers Actor, Director,Mother

Timothy Turner - Real Estate Agent

Kiera Hill Dancer

Johnna Wright & Sascha Director/Mother - Son/Dreamer

Decker & Nick Hunt Cat & 19th century amateur

George Bowering Poet

Celia Duthie Gallerist

Linda Lorenzo Mother

Katheryn Petersen Accordionist

Stefanie Denz Artist

Ivette Hernández Actress

Byron Chief-Moon Actor/Dancer

Colin Horricks Doctor

Ian Mulgrew Vancouver Sun Columnist

Jocelyn Morlock Composer

Corinne McConchie Librarian

Rachel Ditor Dramaturg

Patrick Reid Statesman, Flag Designer

Michael Varga CBC Cameraman

Bronwen Marsden Playwright/Actress/Director

David Baines Vancouver Sun Columnist

Alex Waterhouse-Hayward Photographer

Lauren Elizabeth Stewart Student

Sandrine Cassini Dancer/Choreographer

Meredith Kalaman Dancer/Choreographer

Juliya Kate Dominatrix



For The Pleasure Of Seeing Her Again - A Universal Play
Friday, February 21, 2014




 
Margo Kane


Rosemary and I went tonight Friday to the opening performance of the Talking Stick Festival play, of Michel Tremblay’s For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again at the York Theatre.

Much has been written about this play and a few might remember that at one time Tremblay’s work was deemed edgy and that the Arts Club Theatre Company mounted it many years ago.

It would seem that age might have diminished the power of this play which is all about the relationship between a mother and son.

I am happy to report (in spite of some of the sadness within part of the play) that For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again is as relevant to our times as it ever was. That Margo Kane and Kevin Loring, the actors of the play happen to be Native Canadian is almost irrelevant. The play is universal even though our funny son and beginning narrator, Kevin Loring tells us that the play is not Richard III or about Hamlet or any other play of the Western canon.

I could rave about the acting which is superb. I could elaborate on how Kevin Loring (a noted playwright) can play a child, a dreamer, an adult, a loving son, an exasperated son, etc.

I am not.


Kevin Loring


This play has a particular message which was beautifully pointed out by Elder Shane Pointe who blessed the proceedings with a chant and then said something like this:
In this festival and in this play you will find out something about us, you may know little about us even though you sees us in your midst all the time.

It struck me that he could have been talking about French Canadians (consider that the play was originally written in French and the two protagonists live in Montreal), Vancouver Chinese and every visible and invisible minority of our city, province and country.


Glinis Leyshon


A good play should challenge. This one did in spades while at the same time generating within me lots of warm laughs. Sitting behind me was director Glynis Leyshon. She was smiling. It could be that somehow the ending of the play could be perceived as a happy one. You must see the play to make up your own mind.
 
Anybody reading this should be aware that the play  is on tonight at 8pm.



Grace Symmetry - Rachel Meyer & Darren Devaney
Thursday, February 20, 2014



 
Darren Devaney

Quite a few years ago then editor of Vancouver Magazine, Malcolm Parry, threw and expensive wide angle lens at me and told me, “You are making the motions. Go back and take some good photographs.”

I have never forgotten his passionate fit of rage. Since that time I have tried to put as much passion as I can with what I do.

And I must report herewith that after seeing tonight’s first performance of Grace Symmetry, a Ballet BC collaboration with the Turning Point Ensemble, that there was enough hot passion to perhaps ease us into an early spring. That heat was comforting and thrilling.



Lauri Stallings & Owen Underhill
 But we live in a city with a penchant for forgetting its past. Our memory is fractured.

I remember a day in 1997, during rehearsals for Ballet BC's Boy Wonder when I first met composer Owen Underhill. He was a warm, self-effacing man with a gently smile and rarely seemed to speak beyond a whisper. At the time I was absolutely smitten by a ballet BC dancer called Lauri Stallings. She seemed to be a dancer from another planet with an exquisite style that was so different that when she danced I could recognize her from the ankles down.

I asked her if she would pose with Underhill for a photograph. I asked her to be his muse.

The resulting photograph (I didn’t bother to check that my picture was much too close and I should have given it more room) is the one you see here.

But it is one of the most satisfying photographs I have ever taken and I have been a fan of those two passionate beings and what they represented. One was the passion of Ballet BC the other of modern music of which now as the Artistic Director of the Turning Point Ensemble I can more often dip into when I feel the cold setting in.

It might seem strange that this blogger and amateur (no expert but in the 19th century sense of being enamored by it) follower of new music and dance would even mention a dancer long gone from Ballet BC (who is happily heading a dance company in Atlanta).


Kevin O'Day & Owen Underhill
I may be at an advantage over any real dance critics here. Most usually base their essays on watching a performance and or interviewing people with the long distance feeling of a phone. If anything our diminishing media does not inform us because so many of their writers remain within the confines of their offices. They don’t inform us because they miss a lot of the peripherals which can be most interesting and can enhance the pleasure of a performance.

Consider that tonight a little bird sitting very near me told me that dancer Gilbert Small (you cannot miss him as he is Ballet BC’s sole black dancer) sprained his ankle on Monday. The little bird was afraid that Small might have gone to a hospital. But Small’s role was big in all three works and he danced as I and the little bird bit our fingernails figuratively. We expected something terrible to happen. It never did!

The second piece of the evening Prelude by choreographer/dancer Medhi Walerski from the Netherlands Dance Theatre had to be changed from what I saw in the initial rehearsal on Monday of the other week. The change had to do with the white back wall of the Arts Umbrella’s rehearsal hall. A crucial part involved the seeing of black string across the stage while dancer Darren Devaney weaved and ducked with the lines. The Queen Elizabeth’s dark back wall made it difficult for an audience to see this.

It was Walerski who explained this to me when I spotted him in the audience. I asked him what had led him to select Devaney for the piece. Walerksi put his right hand over his heart and told me, “He touched me here.” 



The last piece, Here on End with choreography by Kevin O’Day (who told me he was from Detroit via Germany) had extraordinary lighting by James Proudfoot. When I first saw Here on End at the Arts Umbrella rehearsal studio on 7th Avenue, I watched Proudfoot with his iPad as he recorded Here on End. The lighting was high fluorescent. I asked him if he knew what he was going to do. He told me that he did not know.

Here on End begins with a dramatic overhead spotlight that lowers itself onto one dancer. Then during the whole performance several banks of these spotlights are raised and lowered (sometimes dramatically low). The look I found nicely reminiscent with the swirls of lights of flying saucers in Close Encounters of the Third Kind. And to think that it all began with an iPad!


Ben Kinsman, horn, Tom Shorthouse, trumpet, Jeremy Berkman, trombone

All three works explored different configurations of the Turning Point Ensemble.

The first one, In Motion by choreographer Wen Wei Wang and with music composed by Underhill had lots of moments of special silence where you could hear the swish the pointe shoes. The ensemble (a smaller one) was behind the dancers, on stage and not on the pit. The music like its composer was quiet and gentle not at all scary like some who shun new music might tell you. If anything the music seemed to go very well with Wen Wei Wang’s gentle and elegant touch. Proof of this was the solo performance of  Brenda Fedoruk on flute and violinist Mary Sokol Brown who separately went on stage while a dancers (in the first it was Alexis Fletcher) weaved around them. 

Dancing trombone mutes
 The second piece, Prelude choreographed by Medhi Walerski and with music composed by a Russian resident of New York, Lera Auerbach was unique in that it had only two performers, not seen on stage. They were violinist Peter Krysa and pianist Jane Hayes.

While Hayes did tell me apologetically, after the performance, that her piano was electronically enhanced I can attest that she could have done without any enhancement. This piece also had nice long moments of no music that compensated for a few, very loud, use of the piano for what it is, an instrument of percussion. This was unlike the third piece, Choreographer Kevin O’ Day and music by John King, Here on End.

Here on End had dancers constantly dancing to music that did not give ground. What came to mind was a school of sharks unable to stop movement. It was a perpetual motion machine and Turning Point Ensemble filled the pit with as many musicians as it could muster. After the performance, in the lounge on the third floor I spotted composer John King chatting with lots of laughter and excitement with Co-Artistic Director Jeremy Berkman who had a big grin on his face. I can tell you why. Berkman is the Turning Point Ensemble’s trombonist and Here on End had a nice long, very loud and very beautiful trombone part!

To me it seemed that Ballet BC in the past was short on men. Or it seemed then that I noticed the women but ignored the men whom I saw as "picker uppers" and fillers. There were quite a few exceptions of which I will not mention here but I must now note that I notice the men, lots. You would never have suspected unless you read your program that former Arts Umbrella Dance Company’s Scott Fowler was not a full fledged dancer of the company but is listed as an apprentice dancer with that other colleague from Arts Umbrella, Ryan Genoe who I am sure will very soon also have a longer time on stage.

I believe that many if not most of Ballet BC’s dancers would stand out if the choreographer gives them the part. As a dance ensemble you also have to fit in. It's that mix that makes some stars and some not. But I can safely say that none in Ballet BC just make the motion. They make motion with passion.

It is difficult for anybody watching dance to not have favourites. When you list your favourites you might be seen as insulting those who did not stand out simply because you might have been looking elsewhere. So you are careful and try to be diplomatic. I won’t have to because is would seem that my faves have the nod of all three choreographers.

Jane Hayes, piano
Two of those dancers (my absolute faves) are Rachel Meyer and Darren Devaney. More on these two below.

I missed Dario Dinuzzi, an excellent male dancer has suffered an injury that kept him out most of last year and this year. Alexander Burton shined in Wen Wei Wang’s In Motion (in a duet with Rachel Meyer). Thiboult Eiferman, (the Parisian Newyorican) was smooth and especially when he danced with his friend Devaney. Peter Smida got suddenly sick today and had to be relieved. He is a very strong and masculine dancer. I missed him but happily Gilbert Small, Connor Gnam and Daniel Marshalsay made me almost forget Smida’s  sudden departure.

Rachel Meyer & Darren Devaney

But back to the real stars, the divas, the super dancers of the evening. They are Rachel Meyer and Darren Devaney. The former you notice before she even moves. It could be her striking face and her seriousness or her body which has no fat and is all sinewy muscle. The latter, Devaney you would not notice at first. He is quiet, smallish. But then he moves, then you cannot look at anybody else with the exception of his partner in Prelude, Rachel Meyer.

I am no expert on these matters but when Meyer dances everybody else fades away, though given a chance Alexis Fletcher can give her a run for her money.

David Owen, Oboe
Luckily for us all, Ballet BC dancers are not baseball players so Meyer and Devaney will not be demanding more money and a new contract for next year. On the other hand I would not blame them if they did.

At the lounge I went up to Devaney and asked him about his signature alternating movement of his chest and stomach (in and then out) as he breathed heavily at one point. “What do you call it?  His answer was short, “Posturing movement.” And with that, like Medhi Walerski, I knew he had touched my heart.

And from the heart I would like to go back to the head. And that’s Emily Molnar, Artistic Director of Ballet BC who has the class and the credibility to get choreographers of the caliber of those avant-garde dance companies from Europe while nurturing our very own local ones like Wen Wei Wang.



Rachel Meyer



Dr. Eric Vogt - November 12, 1929 - February 19, 2014.
Wednesday, February 19, 2014



Dr. Eric Vogt - November 12, 1929 - February 19, 2014.


Dr. Eric Vogt

Dr. Eric Vogt and I played a game at Early Music Vancouver concerts at the Chan which he attended with regularity. When I spotted this large friendly grizzly-bear-of-a-man I would loudly ask him this sort of a question:

How are the charms?

He would answer:

They are accelerating as we speak.

Or my question might be:

How are those neutrinos doing?

His usual answer:

They are going through me this instant.

People around him would look at him and then at me stupefied. Dr. Vogt never smiled. It was our private joke.



The Last Temptation Of Bond
Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Honey Ryder - alive, seeking revenge.
The Last Temptation of Bond
Kimmy Beach


 
Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder photographed by Bunny Yeager


It was the latter part of 1962 and I had just graduated from a boarding high school, St. Edward’s in Austin, Texas. I was confused and had no idea what to do with my life. So I crashed in my mother’s house in Veracruz, Mexico. Her house was also the one-room schoolhouse for the children of the engineers and employees of Alcoa Aluminum. My mother was the teacher.

My mother had two American friends who came to visit to play bridge. The fourth player was a German woman who drove one of those Toyota Land Cruisers and had a shop in downtown Veracruz that sold Mexican curios.

When the woman of the Toyota could not make it I was lured as the fourth partner. I was taught to play the game. I could not know then, I was much too naïve, that the pair were lesbians, and probably the Toyota gal, too and that somehow Alcoa did not have any issues with my mother having such friends.

The pair were the ones who introduced me to the James Bond novels of Ian Fleming. I had seen Dr. No (yum, Ursula Andress as Honey Ryder) in one of the port’s movie houses  and I was so excited that I was lent one of the original pocketbooks that were being published at the time. As they came out, the two women would pass them by me. I read them all. After our bridge sessions I would retire to my hot and humid room and read the novels until dawn. We discussed plots over subsequent bridge games. I came to respect, admire and love these two women who (and I feel most lucky) introduced me to the books of Ian Fleming. I have always thought that the writing should precede the moving image. An of course since my mother was an Eric Ambler fan, she read the Bond novels.

In that light I am delighted to inform any who might be reading this that there is a new and exciting book on things Bond, The Last Temptation of Bond. It is written by one of our Canadian poets, Kimmy Beach who lives in Red Deer, Alberta.



 On CBC Radio (bless them in spite of an ever diminishing profile) on Shelagh Rogers (whose melodious voice is almost, but not quite as good as her mother’s) The Next Chapter I heard her interview Beach yesterday.

It seems that Beach became quite obsessed, early in her life with James Bond films. Her fave James Bond, after considering Sean Connery at length is Daniel Craig. She mentioned that Ian Fleming himself thought that Hoagy Carmichael's looks matched his idea of the perfect James Bond.

In this book of wonderful poetry on all things Bond, Beach invents a few what-if situations and also a very exciting but mysterious woman she calls One.  

In the interview she mentions the least popular and almost unknown Bond, George Lazenby On His Majesty’s Secret                   (1969). I find that hard to believe if you are a fan (and I am one) of Diana Rigg who plays Bond’s bride and who does not survive her day in church.

I have purchased the book at Chapters which after reading will present as a gift to my 16-year-old granddaughter Rebecca who has seen all of the James Bond films. I am sure that this book will delight her.

Here (with no permission from the author) is my favourite poem by her in this handsome but slim volume:

The World is Not Enough

I SEE HIM EVERY DAY, But she can have him anytime she likes.

He comes into my office, tosses his hat on the rack, embraces
Me. His lips on my cheek, his eyelashes brushing mine. He says,
“Moneypenny, what would I do without you?”

I honestly don’t know. I’ve saved him repeatedly. I’ve made so many excuses for him!

I have everything. But I have such longing. Such…I’d let myself be
killed for one night with him above me, inside me, all over me.

There is so much darkness at my core. Darkness I cannot confess
to myself, never mind to him. The horrifying thoughts I have of
pulling his gun from its holster while he is embracing me. I don’t
want him to know this darkness, this desire that consumes me.
This temptation to pull that gun from his body, shoot him in the
Chest. In the place where a heart would be. The next shot for me.

I want to cut him limb to limb. I want him to bend to my knife, let
his open veins come all over me. Then I’d cut my own heart in half.
There’s no other way for us.

There’s my intercom. M and the bloody demands. Just once I’d
like to tell M to stuff it, but I like my job. I like the people. I like
the secrecy. And I hate James.



The Blood Promise - Mark Pryor, Cary Grant & James Bond
Monday, February 17, 2014



 
Mark Pryor at St. Ed's, Austin Texas


There is an event happening at home that I could have never predicted. After having seen 18 episodes of the Italian-made series Montalbano based on the novels of Andrea Camilleri (I have read all of the books, 16 that have been translated from the Italian) with Rosemary, my wife, she is now on her fourth Camilleri novel. She is reading one per night.

Now this does not mean that Camilleri’s novels are lightweight. The man from Porto Empedocle, Sicily is 89 but his style reads like new-wave noir (I just invented the term) and consider that the old man wrote his first Salvo Montalbano novel La forma dell'acqua in 1994 when he was 69. And he has written 20 more!

No there are mystery novels in which the principal protagonist suffers existential angst, a Chandler Marlowe or Leonardo Padura’s troubled Havana detective Mario Conde.  The same could be said of Pepe Carvalho, the book burning detective of Manuel Vázquez Montalbán. Vázquez Montalbán wrote 13 of these (the best is the exquisite Quinteto de Buenos Aires which is one of the best ever novels about a most real Buenos Aires).

Like Gregory Peck’s acting, when you read Camilleri you must imagine what is going in Salvo Montalbanos complex mind. The TV series, most faithful to the books take more time but do not reveal much more of our detective who likes to eat and swim alone.

All the above is my prelude in raving about Mark Pryor’s third novel, The Blood Promise, featuring the head of security at the American Embassy in Paris, Hugo Marston.

The very Texan Marston as written by the very British but Austin, Texas resident (he is an Assistant District Attorney of Travis County) author seems to have few hang-ups. His protagonist as described by his much more complex Tom Green, ex-FBI and active CIA agent (his only competition for being a recovering, not always, drunkard is James Le Burke’s Dave Robicheaux):

Tom knew that his own brain was pretty efficient in a crunch, and the truth was that Hugo had been one of the first guys he’d known to keep up with him on that score. And Tom was fine with having an intellectual equal. What he wasn’t fine was the fact that this particular equal looked like Cary Grant and acted like James Bond, but didn’t know how to be anything but modest. Very fucking annoying, and a complete waste of chick magnetism, as far as Tom was concerned.

New in this third novel, like the others based in Paris, is a man-turned-woman (and who likes girls) who is now a member of the Paris Police. She works with that other Marston friend Raúl García whose family was originally from Barcelona.

The plot in The Blood Promise involves a Xenophobic US senator, a huge Château and Marie Antoinette. There are a few gruesome murders as it would seem that Pryor has seen a few of them in his job as an Assistant DA in that gun-toting state of Texas.

And you know that Pryor’s British demeanor is beginning to fade as he uses that term of my youth in Austin, in the 50s, a piece of tail.

But the excitement that I got from turning one page to another is all there and while I cannot compete with Rosemary’s speed with Camilleri, I can assure you that at the very least Blood Promise is at the most a two-night read.


 I must happily reaffirm that the well-adjusted Marston almost reminds me of James Bond (not as slick, he is Texan after all!) and I think the world of literature needs more James Bonds.

But this does not mean that you do not learn a few important things during the fast ride through multiple-padlocked Paris bridges (read The Blood Promise to find out what I mean by that). Consider that you may not know who Sebastian Melmoth was. Do you?

After Oscar Wilde’s buggery scandal which occurred at the Cadogan Hotel (I slept in that hotel once!) he thought that changing his name might help. It didn’t. Sebastian Melmoth is a combination of Saint Sebastian and Melmoth a protagonist of Melmoth the Wanderer a gothic novel by his great uncle Charles Maturin.

What is  especially appealing to me is that Marston and his CIA buddy use the latest of techniques, DNA swabs, bugging devices, and even a British professional dominatrix to help solve clues. And there is another charmer here. James Lee Burke has his 12-step protagonist describe in great detail the condensation on a large glass of Jax Beer that he cannot or must not drink. Pryor does one better. Marston, believes that by not having booze in the apartment that he shares with Tom Green that the latter will not be tempted. And when they dine in fine Paris Cafes where Green orders mineral water, Marston feels guilty in ordering anything alcoholic. The best part is that Greens knows this and enjoys it to the hilt. 

I hope Pryor writes a fourth novel soon and that he manages to return a tired  Hugo Marsten on leave to Austin where suddenly…



That Odd Couple
Sunday, February 16, 2014




 
The Odd Couple, Raúl & Alex in Veracruz, 1964
He objected when I put oil and vinegar, pepper and salt on my avocado halves. I couldn't stand his taste for Hungarian films. He sermonized me every time I had grapefruits. Oranges or lemons had more vitamin C. I could not stand the way he slurped his Corn Flakes with chop sticks.

Moving from one city in one country to another a few times is a sure way of leaving one with blanks in events that happen in those places when one has moved on. I really never knew who Neil Simon  was until recently.

While I was in Buenos Aires when Evita died I was not there when Perón was brought down.

I lived in Mexico City when Pat Nixon came to our school, was in Austin during the failed Bay of Pigs but was back in Mexico City and in a bus when I found out President Kennedy had been assassinated.

It was then, in the early 60s that I first met Raúl Guerrero Montemayor who was 12 years older than I was. He was born, perhaps in the United States or in Mexico. None of us who ever knew him were quite sure where. But we did know that he had a Filipino heritage, spoke 10 languages and looked very much like one of the sons that the first president of the Philippines, Manuel L. Quézon, might have had.

He was a friend of my favourite uncle Don Luís Miranda.

It was Raúl who educated me on the wonder of European films and good literature. It was Raúl who drove me in his VW to Veracruz for my first adult glimpse of the sea and it smells.

Most of us suspected Raúl was a closet gay. Being gay in those days was tough in a macho society. Raúl thus had a fondness for falling in love with women who were always leaving town at the airport.

If I happened to spend the night at his Zona Rosa apartment, after a late night of Antonioni and coffee at the Kineret Café one of my cousins warned me to “make sure you sleep with a book between your bum and your pijama pants.”

I can attest here that Raúl was always a gentleman and when he died January 9, 2013, I knew I had lost a best friend and an important influence in making me the man I am today.

Before I married my Rosemary in 1968 I had been staying in Raúl’s apartment. Having returned from my military service in Argentina in 1967 Raúl offered his apartment and helped me get a job teaching English.

We saw more European films, discussed philosophy, listened to Erik Satie and live a mutual life of bachelorhood before I met Rosemary and whom if I do remember might have bedded in Raúl’s loft which is where I slept.

It was a shock, but a pleasant one to have seen Neil Simon’s The Odd Couple, with Rosemary, on its opening performance at the Art Club’s Stanley Industrial Alliance Theatre on January 29.

Consider that I may have been the only person that evening who had never seen any kind of Odd Couple, be it on TV or in a film. It was virgin territory for me.

Listening to Sound Designer Murray Price’s mood music (all 60s jazz ) of the 60s and close to the writing of the play and its inaugural run in 1965 in Broadway immediately took me back to my mid 60s and my love for the West Coast Jazz of California and the cool jazz of Miles Davis.

There are those who see the two women in the play Gwendolyn Pigeon and Cecily Pigeon (beautifully played by Sasa Brown and Kate Dion-Richard) are there so that theatre goers of the 60s would not read some sort of gay interplay between Felix Unger (played by Robert Moloney) and Oscar Madison (Andrew McNee). All the men in this play and particularly as peformed by the cast including Josh Drebit (Speed) Joel Wirkkunen (Murray) and Alec Willows (Roy) give no hint of gay shenanigans. And yet for me it did not make a difference one way or another. It is a play about the beautiful intimacy (its ups and downs) that male friends share.

I enjoyed John Murphy’s take, Simon’s humor was all there. Set Designer David Roberts and Costume Designer Barbara Clayden, made sure that everything was right, from the stereo on a shelf to the three circular bladed razor that Oscar Madison uses to spruce up for the visit by the two Pigeon sisters.


The Odd Couple to me was nostalgic romp in my past that made me appreciate how I got to be where I am. Now if I could only figure out if I was Felix or Oscar!



     

Previous Posts
Rosa 'James Mason' - All Potential & More

Jacqueline du Pré Returns & I Smile

You Have Guilt - I Have Sorrow - Children of God

Dazzling Movement in Cultch's Children of God

Linda Lorenzo & My Father's Flag

Linda Lorenzo - Nostalgia Ayer y Hoy

My Neighbourhood Tulpengekte

Three Mothers & One More

Santa Conchita del Molino de la Pampa & Fernet Bra...

Testing & Inspiration with a Lovely Roman - Silvia...



Archives
1/15/06 - 1/22/06

1/22/06 - 1/29/06

1/29/06 - 2/5/06

2/5/06 - 2/12/06

2/12/06 - 2/19/06

2/19/06 - 2/26/06

2/26/06 - 3/5/06

3/5/06 - 3/12/06

3/12/06 - 3/19/06

3/19/06 - 3/26/06

3/26/06 - 4/2/06

4/2/06 - 4/9/06

4/9/06 - 4/16/06

4/16/06 - 4/23/06

4/23/06 - 4/30/06

4/30/06 - 5/7/06

5/7/06 - 5/14/06

5/14/06 - 5/21/06

5/21/06 - 5/28/06

5/28/06 - 6/4/06

6/4/06 - 6/11/06

6/11/06 - 6/18/06

6/18/06 - 6/25/06

6/25/06 - 7/2/06

7/2/06 - 7/9/06

7/9/06 - 7/16/06

7/16/06 - 7/23/06

7/23/06 - 7/30/06

7/30/06 - 8/6/06

8/6/06 - 8/13/06

8/13/06 - 8/20/06

8/20/06 - 8/27/06

8/27/06 - 9/3/06

9/3/06 - 9/10/06

9/10/06 - 9/17/06

9/17/06 - 9/24/06

9/24/06 - 10/1/06

10/1/06 - 10/8/06

10/8/06 - 10/15/06

10/15/06 - 10/22/06

10/22/06 - 10/29/06

10/29/06 - 11/5/06

11/5/06 - 11/12/06

11/12/06 - 11/19/06

11/19/06 - 11/26/06

11/26/06 - 12/3/06

12/3/06 - 12/10/06

12/10/06 - 12/17/06

12/17/06 - 12/24/06

12/24/06 - 12/31/06

12/31/06 - 1/7/07

1/7/07 - 1/14/07

1/14/07 - 1/21/07

1/21/07 - 1/28/07

1/28/07 - 2/4/07

2/4/07 - 2/11/07

2/11/07 - 2/18/07

2/18/07 - 2/25/07

2/25/07 - 3/4/07

3/4/07 - 3/11/07

3/11/07 - 3/18/07

3/18/07 - 3/25/07

3/25/07 - 4/1/07

4/1/07 - 4/8/07

4/8/07 - 4/15/07

4/15/07 - 4/22/07

4/22/07 - 4/29/07

4/29/07 - 5/6/07

5/6/07 - 5/13/07

5/13/07 - 5/20/07

5/20/07 - 5/27/07

5/27/07 - 6/3/07

6/3/07 - 6/10/07

6/10/07 - 6/17/07

6/17/07 - 6/24/07

6/24/07 - 7/1/07

7/1/07 - 7/8/07

7/8/07 - 7/15/07

7/15/07 - 7/22/07

7/22/07 - 7/29/07

7/29/07 - 8/5/07

8/5/07 - 8/12/07

8/12/07 - 8/19/07

8/19/07 - 8/26/07

8/26/07 - 9/2/07

9/2/07 - 9/9/07

9/9/07 - 9/16/07

9/16/07 - 9/23/07

9/23/07 - 9/30/07

9/30/07 - 10/7/07

10/7/07 - 10/14/07

10/14/07 - 10/21/07

10/21/07 - 10/28/07

10/28/07 - 11/4/07

11/4/07 - 11/11/07

11/11/07 - 11/18/07

11/18/07 - 11/25/07

11/25/07 - 12/2/07

12/2/07 - 12/9/07

12/9/07 - 12/16/07

12/16/07 - 12/23/07

12/23/07 - 12/30/07

12/30/07 - 1/6/08

1/6/08 - 1/13/08

1/13/08 - 1/20/08

1/20/08 - 1/27/08

1/27/08 - 2/3/08

2/3/08 - 2/10/08

2/10/08 - 2/17/08

2/17/08 - 2/24/08

2/24/08 - 3/2/08

3/2/08 - 3/9/08

3/9/08 - 3/16/08

3/16/08 - 3/23/08

3/23/08 - 3/30/08

3/30/08 - 4/6/08

4/6/08 - 4/13/08

4/13/08 - 4/20/08

4/20/08 - 4/27/08

4/27/08 - 5/4/08

5/4/08 - 5/11/08

5/11/08 - 5/18/08

5/18/08 - 5/25/08

5/25/08 - 6/1/08

6/1/08 - 6/8/08

6/8/08 - 6/15/08

6/15/08 - 6/22/08

6/22/08 - 6/29/08

6/29/08 - 7/6/08

7/6/08 - 7/13/08

7/13/08 - 7/20/08

7/20/08 - 7/27/08

7/27/08 - 8/3/08

8/3/08 - 8/10/08

8/10/08 - 8/17/08

8/17/08 - 8/24/08

8/24/08 - 8/31/08

8/31/08 - 9/7/08

9/7/08 - 9/14/08

9/14/08 - 9/21/08

9/21/08 - 9/28/08

9/28/08 - 10/5/08

10/5/08 - 10/12/08

10/12/08 - 10/19/08

10/19/08 - 10/26/08

10/26/08 - 11/2/08

11/2/08 - 11/9/08

11/9/08 - 11/16/08

11/16/08 - 11/23/08

11/23/08 - 11/30/08

11/30/08 - 12/7/08

12/7/08 - 12/14/08

12/14/08 - 12/21/08

12/21/08 - 12/28/08

12/28/08 - 1/4/09

1/4/09 - 1/11/09

1/11/09 - 1/18/09

1/18/09 - 1/25/09

1/25/09 - 2/1/09

2/1/09 - 2/8/09

2/8/09 - 2/15/09

2/15/09 - 2/22/09

2/22/09 - 3/1/09

3/1/09 - 3/8/09

3/8/09 - 3/15/09

3/15/09 - 3/22/09

3/22/09 - 3/29/09

3/29/09 - 4/5/09

4/5/09 - 4/12/09

4/12/09 - 4/19/09

4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17