A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Figurative Art - An Obsession
Saturday, September 16, 2017





Figurative art, sometimes written as figurativism, describes artwork—particularly paintings and sculptures—that is clearly derived from real object sources, and is therefore by definition representational. "Figurative art" is often defined in contrast to abstract art:

Since the arrival of abstract art the term figurative has been used to refer to any form of modern art that retains strong references to the real world.
Wikipedia

Recently in this nice essay in the NY Times about Manet I found out that he had a favourite subject called Victorine Meurent who appeared in at least five of his paintings. The most famous ones were  Le Déjeuner sur l’Herbe and the other Olympia.

While I am not a painter or an artist this was comforting as I have a photographed a few women in my life who were my steady subjects (some of them for years).

On Friday I attended an opening of new paintings by Thomas Anfield at the Gallery 7 (on 14 West 7th Ave). While there I did not notice anybody from our moribund media, but I did notice at least three artists, Allan Storey, Richard Tetrault, and the artist formerly known as 12 Midnite. Also there were , Kokoro’s Barbara Bourget , Jay Hirabayashi, and jazz singer Kate Hammett-Vaughan. Also there was dancer Ziyian Kwan and bookseller husband Rod Clarke. For me this represented a distinct comfort in what to me seems like a declining art scene in our city.



It does not take too much noticing to understand that Thomas Anfield, a fine figurative painter who is flirting with cubism, that his inspiration (and I would use the word, in a nice way, obsession) is his strikingly beautiful wife Melo. In fact when I asked Melo if her nose was the most famous in Vancouver she smiled and nodded positively.

Below you will read a personal opinion of mine. Note that I am not an art critic and of art I know nothing.

My conclusion in noting that Richard Tetrault, Thomas Anfield, Neil Wedman,  Angela Grossmannand Tiko Kerr (some of my fave local painters) are not overly rich and famous perhaps because they do not have overtly obvious painter’s block. They paint and paint. They have lots of stuff.

It would almost seem that in Vancouver we want our artists to suffer and have long shallow periods of uncertainty.

My guess is that Pablo Picasso would have failed in Vancouver. If you are prolific you cannot be of any consequence.


Barbara Bourget & Jay Hirabayashi



Embryotrophic Cavatina - Requiem For My Friend
Friday, September 15, 2017



As Ks go Krzysztof Kieslowski and Kokoro Dance would be pretty close in my files. But they are not because I have a separate file under D for Dance and that is where Kokoro Dance is.

And yet…

In my Thursday Vancouver Sun (yes I am subscribed to the daily as I want to know what is going on in my city) I read the interview between the Sun’s Shawn Conner and Kokoro Dance’s one half (the other being Barbara Bourget) Jay Hirabayashi.

To my amazement the two Ks are very close. You see the choreographic work Embryotrophic Cavatina (with Hirabayashi, Bourget, Billy Marchenski and Molly McDermott) that is to open this Wednesday at 8pm at the Roundhouse Performance Centre has as its music composer Sbigniew Preisner's orchestral work Requiem For My Friend. Preisner’s friend was Polish film director Kieslowski who died in 1998.

I photographed Kieslowski in October of 1994.




I met up with Barbara Bourget and Jay Hirabayashi at the opening of Thomas Anfield's show at the West 7 Studios on Friday. Behind the pair is a work by Anfield and we all know that his favourite subject is his wife Melo.








The Man From Pittsburg Almost Made Me Smile
Thursday, September 14, 2017

Linton Garner & his Peck Horn



 Of late as the weather begins to cool and the prospect of another winter in front of me, it is hard not to be melancholy. It gets worse when I think of how many people I photographed who committed suicide. Today, coming back from a saxophone and cello concert in New Westminster my list of 9 grew to 10 when I remembered yet another one.

I arrived home determined to write a blog with a more positive and cheerful note. And yet this one will be bittersweet as I remember a fine man, pianist Linton Garner, who died when he was 88. He had an easy smile and a a reserved demeanour.

He had a sense of humour and instinctively knew what to say when I asked the right question.

Once at Rossini’s in Kitsilano,  a jazz joint he often played in I took my friend Patricia Hutter then one of the bassists at the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra. I asked a question of Garner, knowing how he was going to answer.

Linton,” I asked, “I understand you are from Pittsburg. Who else is from there?

His reply was the usual one, “There’s Roy Eldridge, Ahmad Jamal, Art Blakey, George Benson, Kenny Clarke, Stanley and Terry Turrentine, Ray Brown, Billy Strayhorn, Earl Hines, my brother Erroll, Billy Eckstine…””

When it seemed he was going to go on forever, I interrupted, “Who isn’t from  Pittsburg? “ 

His answer was, “There’s J.J. Johnson, he’s from Indianapolis.”

Below is my corrected (sort of)  notes of my interview with Garner. They are fine, interesting but I am not quite sure if I want to smile.




The Fuji X-E1 Soon To Be on a Shelf
Wednesday, September 13, 2017




In 1958 I bought my first camera, an Agfa Silette in a Washington DC pawnshop. I had traveled with some fellow St. Edward’s High School students in a chartered Greyhound bus. The first roll I shot with that camera was with Kodak Tri-X. I soon was flummoxed by the camera’s limitations. The lens could not be removed.


Agfa Silette


I save up with odd jobs with Brother Hubert Koeppen and by 1959 I had a Pentacon-F Single Lens Reflex that I purchased for $100 from Olden Cameras in NY City. I remember that day when Brother Emmett, C.S.C. who ran the PX type shot at St. Ed’s indicated that there was a package for me. That was the day that I opened this glossy (very beautiful) box that contained that new-fangled SLR. In those days rangefinder cameras were the cameras to have.

Since that day sometime in 1959 I have had many cameras and I have kept juts about all of them. They are behind me on top of a couple of negative metal filing cabinets as I write this.
Just about a week ago it dawned me that my first digital camera (the only one I have ever had) my Fuji X-E1 is now 4 years old. As always my Rosemary was right when she insisted I modernize my ways back in 2013. This camera has been a Godsend.

With it I learned to shoot Arts Umbrella dancers with slow shutter speeds. I recently applied that technique with the circus/theatre performers of  the New Zealand troupe TheDust Palace at the Cultch’s York Theatre.


Rochelle Mangan - Goblin Markete - The Dust Palace
But I have been frustrated in that the camera is unable to focus quickly in the dark situation of a theatre. Anybody who shoots movement knows that in a peak movement that movement is zero. When a baseball batter hits the ball movement is zero. A camera’s slow shutter speed will freeze that motion.

For me motion is best reflected in a combination of freeze and blur. I use shutter speeds that range between ¼ of a second to 1/30th. But it is almost impossible for me to anticipate peak movement (even when I do) m X-E1has a shutter lag as it attempts to focus in low light.

That problem will now be over as I have purchased (a black body in on order at Leo’s Camera on Granville) for the just out Fuji X-E3. Not only does this camera (which will use the two lenses I already have) focus more quickly it also has a silent (no click!) shutter.

As I wait for that phone call from Jeff Gin at Leo’s I am somehow feeling as if I am 17 in Austin, Texas and nagging Brother Emmett if my camera has arrived!



Giclée in French Slang means...
Tuesday, September 12, 2017



I have a friend who believes in this digital age that a photograph taken with a vintage camera loaded with film is automatically art.

I am not sure I agree. What I do believe is that as technology progresses one must be aware of the process and to understand what came before.

Today marks the introduction of the iPhoneX (pronounced ten). Several essays on the subject maintain that with the advent of the iPhone the camera (as a stand along entity) is pretty well obsolete. This is because the recent iPhones are really good cameras with a phone included. For me since I appreciate the use of flash in a studio, until an iPhone can be mated to a studio flash, I would not consider using one.

My advanced Galaxy 5S may have a good camera but I have made it a point not to use and I haven’t even once! I would rather use my better Fuji-X-E1.

But in all the argument as to what is better nothing is being written on the fact that sharper, with brighter colours, with saturated colours do not in their own right make a photograph “better”.
Consider the definition of a well-made inkjet which has the artsy French name of giclée. Wikipedia informs us:

Giclée (/ʒiːˈkleɪ/ zhee-KLAY or /dʒiːˈkleɪ/) is a neologism coined in 1991 by printmaker Jack Duganne for fine art digital prints made on inkjet printers. The name originally applied to fine art prints created on Iris printers in a process invented in the late 1980s but has since come to mean any inkjet print. It is often used by artists, galleries, and print shops to suggest high quality printing but since it is an unregulated word it has no associated warranty of quality.

The word giclée was adopted by Jack Duganne, a printmaker working at Nash Editions. He wanted a name for the new type of prints they were producing on the Iris printer, a large-format, high-resolution industrial prepress proofing inkjet printer they had adapted for fine-art printing. He was specifically looking for a word that would not have the negative connotations of "inkjet" or "computer generated". It is based on the French word gicleur, the French technical term for an inkjet nozzle. The French verb form gicler meant to spray, spout, or squirt. Duganne settled on the noun giclée, meaning "the thing that got sprayed" and also, in French slang, ejaculation (a connotation Duganne did not know).

In 2001 I photographed an excellent subject, Helen, who had a Japanese variation on how Audrey Hepburn would pose with gloves and a hat. The 5 picture display I called Odri. I used a medium format Mamiya RB-67 Pro-SD with b+w film. I scanned the chosen exposures as colour negatives with my scanner for a sort of realistic skin colour result and then had them printed as tiny 2x3 inch giclées. In 2001 giclées had a look that was deemed inferior to photographs as you could see the individual dots of sprayed ink. What you see here is an enlarged to 8x10 version of the 2x3 original. If I were to try to do this today it would be impossible unless I could find a vintage machine.

I have written here and here on the surprising results with the use of an iPhone3G. Its limitations resulted in handsome results that were not accidental.



I am currently trying to figure out how to download photographs that I plan to take with that 3G now that it will not have internet (it will be only a camera!) and be able to use that damn iTunes.



Fairwell French Style - Not
Monday, September 11, 2017


Rosa 'Abraham Darby' September 11 2017


Between 1807–1814 Napoleon’s Grand Armée fought Wellington’s, Portuguese and Spanish troops in what the English call the Peninsular Campaign. Between 1813 and 1814 the French army eventually widthdrew across the Pyrenees. Napoleon’s brother Joseph who had been installed as King of Spain made a quick exit and eventually ended up in New Jersey.

The Spaniards have a very long memory for stuff, particularly of the historical kind. My grandmother who spent her early childhood in Spain in the waning years of the 19th century used to tell me of rude people who left a party without saying goodbye as “despedirse a la francesa,” or “saying goodbye French style.” The expression came from the quick French exit to avoid Wellington’s troops.

In these waning days of summer as fall approaches my once blooming roses (not remontant) have bid me goodbye. But some of my roses, in particular the English Rose Rosa ‘Abraham Darby’ has the odd bloom. I was almost sorry to cut this one today for the scan. It has a glorious scent of fresh fruit. The scent lingers in my nose and Abraham Darby has a few more to go before it politely says goodby.



I am afraid to own a Body
Sunday, September 10, 2017




Emily Dickinson
I am afraid to own a Body—



1090



I am afraid to own a Body—

I am afraid to own a Soul—

Profound—precarious Property—

Possession, not optional—



Double Estate—entailed at pleasure

Upon an unsuspecting Heir—

Duke in a moment of Deathlessness

And God, for a Frontier.







More Emily Dickinson  

But my feet slip nearer every day
The brain - is wider than the sky
To know if any human eyes were near
Linda Melsted - the music of the violin does not emerge alone
The Charm invests her face
A sepal, a petal and a thorn
The Savior must have been a docile Gentleman
T were blessed to have seen
There is no frigate like a book
I pay in satin cash
Emily Dickinson's White Dress & a Hunter of Lost Souls
El vestido blanco - The White Dress
Water makes many beds
 The viola da gamba
 But sequence ravelled out of reach
 A parasol is the umbrella's daughter
 Without the power to die
 Lessons on the piny
Ample make this bed
How happy is the little stone
 Sleep is supposed to be
The shutting of the eye
I dwell in possibility
when Sappho was a living girl
In a library
 A light exists in spring
The lady dare not lift her veil
 I took my power in my hand
 I find my feet have further goals
 I cannot dance upon my toes
The Music of the Violin does not emerge alone
Red Blaze 
He touched me, so I live to know
Rear Window- The Entering Takes Away
Said Death to Passion
 We Wear the Mask That Grins And Lies
It was not death for I stood alone
The Music in the Violin Does Not Emerge Alone
I tend my flowers for thee
Lavinia Norcross Dickinson
Pray gather me anemone! 
Ample make her bed
His caravan of red 
Me-come! My dazzled face  
Develops pearl and weed

But peers beyond her mesh
Surgeons must be very careful
Water is taught by thirst
I could not prove that years had feet
April played her fiddle
A violin in Baize replaced
I think the longest hour
The spirit lasts
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/03/i-left-them-in-ground-emily-dickinson.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/01/i-felt-my-life-with-both-my-hands.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/currer-bell-emily-dickinson-charlotte.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/and-zero-at-bone-with-dirks-of-melody.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/05/charm-invests-her-face.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/i-could-not-see-to-see.html 
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/blonde-assasin-passes-on.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2012/12/you-almost-bathed-your-tongue.html





     

Previous Posts
An Encounter with the Exotic at the York Theatre

Lauren & Casi-Casi Met Up

Edwin Varney - Unstampable

Edward Clendon River - Michael Turner & Modigliani...

Boeing 747 The Queen of the Skies

In Search of My Relevance With The Goblin Market

Marv Newland's Scratchy - Itching Us On

Rain

Cool Ember

In the Spirit of Guilhermina Suggia



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1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

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5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

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7/22/12 - 7/29/12

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9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

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10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

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11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

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2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

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3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

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4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

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6/21/15 - 6/28/15

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7/19/15 - 7/26/15

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8/23/15 - 8/30/15

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9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17

10/1/17 - 10/8/17

10/8/17 - 10/15/17

10/15/17 - 10/22/17