A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

The Unraveling & The Shuffling Of My Beginning To End
Saturday, December 28, 2013



Paul Luchkow, Don Harder, Glenys Webster


In my living room I have a very good sound system that is of the CD player era but I also have, a tuner (few now would know its purpose) a tape deck and a linear tracking turntable. I have no way of playing MP3 files. My iPhone 3G is a telephone and no more. I do not own earphones of any variety.

I believe I might have known what would eventually happen in this century back in the early 50s. My grandmother (who was a fan of swashbucklers, pirate films and westerns) would take me to Calle Lavalle in Buenos Aires. This was a street that mostly had wall to wall cinemas. They featured something called “programa continuado”. We would enter one of theatres and watch a film somewhere in the middle. As soon as it was over we would see the beginning. At the point we had entered, we would leave the theatre and go to the next one and go trough the same process. Sometimes we would note that the next film would begin at a time that would give us an ice cream soda rest. We would take the rest.

That programa continuado was one of the few aspects of my life that did not seem to have the continuity of a beginning, middle and an end.

And then in the late 90s of the last century the CD player came with a button called shuffle. Here is where the trend that brought a continuous disorder to our life. I had not noticed that by the late 70s Saturdays and Sundays were disappearing. Bars were open on Sundays by the time of Expo 86. Some shops were open 24 hours and in fact never closed. The concept of day and night, weekdays and weekends began to blur.

It had been in Mexico in the early 70s when I had noticed that many plants in the city became confused with the lack of seasons. It was poet Homero Aridjis who stated that there was a season of extreme smog and one of not so much fog. There was a season when birds would drop from the sky and a season when they didn’t.

In the 50s during the rainy season it would rain for a couple of hours in the afternoon. That was replaced by a seemingly eternal, “What now?”

When I listen to music in my living room I sometimes read, but not always. If I go to the kitchen to re-heat my tea in the microwave (I am modern in some respects) I can hear the music filtering through opened doors into the kitchen. I have no wireless (or of the wired kind) in my kitchen so I will not hear the immediacy of music that is “right here”. I am most happy to live for hours on end without listening to music either because I want to listen to it or to have it as some sort of comforting background.

One of the techniques that served me well in my photographic studio when I photographed people was to never play any kind of music. The silence would put many of my subjects on edge. I liked it as this meant they never let their thoracic diaphragm go.

In my bathroom I have no radio or water-proof MP3 player. I like to read in a hot tub with silence.

In bed, in our bedroom there is no music. The only sound might be a passing car on the boulevard. We have a clock radio but we now use my iPhone’s subtle wakerupper sound to get us up without stress.

In the garden there are no outdoor speakers. We have never channeled sound from the living room into the garden. The garden has its own sounds. I savour them but I cannot ignore the spring time pressure washers of the neighbourhood.

In the living room I like to pick up a CD or a record. I like to see what is in it and I usually listen to them in the order given. I will listen to some Bach, perhaps some Monk after, followed by Corelli or Twardzik. But I would never listen to one cut of each in no particular order in some shuffle mode. I have a friend who told me once he had downloaded so many hundreds of books. Would my friend shuffle read them?

At one time, when I worked I could tell you if it was Sunday or Tuesday. I am now having problems with that one. I find that I don’t necessarily have to go to bed at some special hour. Nor do I need to get up in the morning at any hour in particular.

The order that was my life is unraveling but I can still hold on to my beginning and end, from here to there with my music.

Programa continuado, be damned I will see films from the exact beginning to the exact end and no in-between will do. 

The distillation of perfect sound



My Boom's Decline
Friday, December 27, 2013




My eldest daughter Alexandra Elizabeth Waterhouse-Hayward lives in Lillooet, British Columbia. She is an elementary school teacher there and happily lives in a one acre property with her cat Banjo.

When she comes to Vancouver she unleashes in our household this desire to organize our lives. I must admit that until she put some order into our basement both Rosemary and I felt there was nothing we could do with all the stuff. But with the objective point of view of our daughter Ale, the basement is now clear, neat and pretty clean. Gone is an obsolete photographic print dryer and a heavy but useless 11x14 dry mounting press. 

Much of my obsolete photographic equipment is against a wall where if I need it (who knows?) I can readily access it. One of the items, much too big to properly store is a Manfrotto super boom.

With this device I was able to suspend a light over my subjects in my studio which had a very high ceiling, one of the necessary requirements of the big Manfrotto boom. The boom with a light that has a grid on it (to narrow the direct beam) can make a wonderful back light and or hair light. Without a boom George Hurrell could never have taken his signature portraits of Marlene Dietrich nor would Dietrich then commanded her film’s directors to use the boom in most of her films.

But my boom had a special role in the portrait of my daughter which I took in 1991. It served to hold one end of my grandmother’s Seville mantilla.

This portrait which is in our bedroom is one of my most favourite portraits ever. In these last days of 2013 I asked myself why I took that picture. I asked myself why I took all those pictures of what every day appears to be a huge output. Here are my conclusions:

1. One never does stuff unless it is assigned. Having a job (even as a freelancer) as a photographer means that one will be assigned. Assignments produce an output.

2. When one exhibits in galleries one plans themes for a show. That produces an output.

3. When one exhibits in themed group exhibitions as I did for many years, that produces an output. In fact this picture of my daughter was my entry on a themed exhibition that may have had the title The Family.

4. When assignments evaporate, when a photographer’s studio is closed, as mine is, opportunities to go to the studio to think of creating something diminish.

5. When I was in my 40s and even 50 I could stop a woman on the street and within days she was undraped in my studio. These days these women might call the police. In jail I would miss my cooking.

6. My wife’s cat Casi-Casi will run away the moment you hold a camera to your face (even a phone). My youngest granddaughter will ask me, “How many pictures are you planning on taking?” The older one simply refuses to have her picture taken.

All that leaves me with a problem. I do not plan to enlarge my photographic output by recording lamp posts, fire hydrants or Vancouver sunsets. Any ideas?


Technical information on the above image. I projected my b+w negative on a sheet of 8x10 Kodak Kodalith (lith film). I processed it in photographic paper developer. This produced a continuous tone (not the usual high contrast that lith film used to be used for) b+w transparency. For my purposes it has to be slightly lighter than a normal photographic print on paper. I immersed the lith film (after very careful washing) in a 1 to 9 bath of selenium toner for archival purposes and to give the picture a warmish tone. I then mounted the transparency with archival sticky tape on a mirror finish silver card.
 The picture is supposed to slightly resemble a Daguerreotype. It does so as the framed picture is over my wife's  bed table lamp.

In praise of the mundane bodyscape

Madeleine Morris under a boom

A boom - from simplicity to complexity and back again



Moths Fluttering At My Kitchen Window Part II
Thursday, December 26, 2013



 


I wrote the blog below on December 04, 2008. It has come to mind as I notice our indoor spider Puig about which I wrote here. He(she) is still alive and it looks like he(she) might make it to the New Year in spite of what must be a very small diet of whatever insects inhabit our home in December. I am astounded by Puig's will to live and his(her) ability to adapt to a situation in which I am sure all of his(her) contemporaries are long gone with the late fall frosts. Native Canadians have a belief (a universal one, I believe in cold climates) that if one survives a winter one will live to see spring and another year. I wish Puig he best.


Moths Fluttering At My Kitchen Window
December 04, 2008

These days as I look out the window of the guest bathroom or out the kitchen window (by the sink) I see little moths fluttering and trying to get in. It could be the light or the warmth they sense is on the other side of the window. They are insects at the end of their cycle.



They remind me of other animals I have seen in the throws of death. For all of us this is an exit we take alone, Hollywood scenes of Lionel Barrymore dying in bed surrounded by his loving family to the contrary. The fluttering of the moth's wings even reminds me of the little vibration in the body of a fighting bull moments before it dies on the sandy arena after it has been pierced by the matador's sword. In that huge arena of cheering people the 600kg bull seems small and pitifully alone. It dies surrounded by thousands of spectators. Is it any different to the shocking image of a dying crow in my garden as its wings like that moth's flutter and then stop?

Sow bugs and other bugs die by the thousands in my garden unseen, but those little moths hit home and sadden me. They are so persistent, trying to live for a few minutes or seconds more.

As the moths fade away I try not to go to the garden. The cold repels and the mush of my hostas as they fade into the ground is a sobering and unwelcome sight. But today I ventured outside anyway and I was rewarded by English Rose Coverdale. There were two blooms that had managed to open. And Rosa 'Ghislaine de Feligonde' while not in bloom sported beautiful new foliage that contrasted with the reddish older leaves. Those very leaves might have little holes next spring as the offspring of those little winter moths chew their way to an eventual confrontation with my kitchen window.



I momentarily forgot about my lonely moths but not forgetting that my own turn by the window in winter will come.



The Genesis Of The Christmas Eve Family Portrait
Wednesday, December 25, 2013

The Setting
Watch that Casi-Casi. I did not set the self-timer so I am not in picture

Casi-Casi digs in.
The best of the lot even though the top of my head is missing

We gave up and called it a night. We then opened the presents.








The Acoustics Of Christmas Eve Music
Tuesday, December 24, 2013



For the December 10 NY Times Rosie Schaap wrote a delightful essay on the idea that going to bar on the afternoon of Christmas Day is not always a terrible experience. Those who may want to read more can pursue the story here

One paragraph caught my eye:

A bar holiday may be tinged with melancholy, but it’s a sweet sort of melancholy. (Its tone is captured perfectly, I’m compelled to say, in John Denver and Rowlf the Dog’s rendition of “Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas” on the “John Denver and the Muppets: A Christmas Together” TV special in 1979.)

This very record (we have it as both a record and as a CD) is my family’s favourite music to open presents by the Christmas tree on Christmas Eve. We follow (as I am originally from Argentina and my daughters were born in Mexico) the custom of celebrating nochebuena and leaving Christmas day as a day to stay in bed, do nothing except eat Belgian chocolates and Spanish marzipan.

But there is another piece of music that is dear to my heart for Christmas. This is Vivaldi’s Gloria (he wrote two) RV 589.

I first heard it a few days before Christmas in Mexico City. It might have been 1973. This was the year that my friend Jorge Urrechaga told me my sound system was not adequate. What hackers do now, Urrechaga did then with smuggling. He had a transistor amplifier(one of the first at the time) that banged over 50 watts per channel RMS. The brand was Acoustic Research and the amplifier had a brass front piece (I like the word escutcheon) and exactly five knobs. It was beautiful. Urrechaga harped on the idea that Acoustic Research with its amplifiers, turntables (I bought the lovely XA-1) and speakers would reproduce music accurately. Urrechaga sold me (cheap) that AR amplifier.

I like to think that the age of enlightenment which began in the latter part of the 17th century and ended in the beginning of the 19th represented an age of scientific discovery and where the idea that all was knowable and possible produced an explosion of activity in which man was the center of all things. I like the sound of the Alejo Carpentier’s version of the term enlightenment as Siglo de las Luces (the century of lights) and the name of one of his most famous novels which follows the first appearance of a French guillotine in the West Indies.

The idea of a century of lights and of the fact that the music of the time was the early baroque and the baroque, produces in my ears, when I listen to Vivaldi’s Gloria, an explosion of positive thinking. Christmas music should give us cheer and hope and baroque music has that in spades.

In the beginning of the 1980 I did not lock my front door. This was a habit. I paid the penalty in that someone walked in one night and took my CD collection and my Acoustic Research AR-3A speakers. The insurance company replaced them with JBL monitors that were supposed to be better. I have never been that sure.

I find the present situation of musical sound suspect. I cannot understand how music can sound at its best with ear buds and with that sound coming out from a digital phone. I do not buy the idea of “enhanced” sound or “enhanced deep bass”. Nor do I accept the idea that music has to come from all sides.

It was on Sunday’s The Bach Cantata Project brought by Early Music Vancouver at the Chan that my idea was further reinforced.

I was centre-front row and very close to violinist Marc Destrubé and his superb group of musicians who specialize in baroque music placed in period instruments.

One of the warmest but most delicate sounding (as in never loud) was Ray Nurse’s lute. And yet while surrounded by a loud baroque chamber organ, a couple of cellos, a bassoon, etc I could hear that lute.

Back in the middle of that cavernous Chan Centre I am sure the lute could not compete.

Baroque music is music to be heard in a large living room or a king’s chamber. Earbuds will not create the reverberation of a chamber’s walls no matter how good your surround sound is.

If I am to follow the path of the now defunct Boston Sound of Acoustic Research I need to be facing a wall of sound coming to me from the front and I will accept that some of it will pass through and bounce back.

At the same time I want to be able to hear that violin, that viola, that cello and the bass without any of those instruments being enhanced in any way. Perhaps if there are two cellos, one might be a better instrument and sound better. I don’t want to make that cello sound better (enhance it) by turning a knob.

For Christmas my eldest daughter will no longer listen to music in her Lillooet home through the tiny speakers of her computer. She will have my AR amplifier and a very good used CD player that I purchased at Lotusland Electronics & Music. But there is more. As I was about to leave with the Technics CD player (perhaps not as good as a Denon I recently purchased there to replace my Sony that finally failed) I made the wrong question to the friendly associate Mitch, “You wouldn’t happen to have any AR speakers, would you?”

As a matter of fact I have these recently restored (they are 35 years old) AR-2ax speakers. We connected them and played my recently fave recording of Colin MacDonald playing Handel with a baritone sax in a trio with a harpsichordist and a cellist. I was blown away by the presence of the sound.

I have been listening to them now for a week as my JBLs are in the basement. My daughter Ale will not note the difference when we open presents on Christmas Eve. The ARs are about the same size. At some point once I give her the amplifier and CD player I will tell her, “You might was as well take my speakers, too.”

My heart will be wrenched but my JBLs will do just fine.





As By Enchantment
Monday, December 23, 2013




 
Mrs. Brandon - Matthew Brady circa 1860-65 US National Archives


While reading Robert Wilson’s interesting and informative Mathew Brady – Portraits of a Nation a paragraph in Chapter 3 caught my eye.

Photography [Chapter 3 deals with the late 1840s, so it was about the daguerreotype] was also among the first examples (along with the telegraph and the railway) of a phenomenon that has become almost commonplace in our time – an advance in technology that transforms rapidly from a state of inconceivable mystery or even magic to something that everyone could and must have access to. In his 1853 dictionary, Noah Webster ended a brief description of the daguerreotype process with “and then the images appear as by enchantment.” Photography was at first as surprising as the possibility of wireless telephone communication seemed to us decades ago, and then as urgent a necessity as the smartphone is today.

 
John Alleyne & Gail Skrela - 1997

One of the photographs attributed to Mathew Brady is this one of Mrs. Brandon taken between 1860 and 1865. It is one of 9 photographs on the book’s cover that especially caught my eye.

The second photograph is one I took John Alleyne in 1997 when he was the Artistic Director of Ballet BC. The dancer is Gail Skrela.

 When I took the picture I had in particular mind the US Civil War portraits of black Union Army soldiers who matter-of-factly stared at the camera having no inkling that we would look at them when they were long dead and buried. Had I wanted to be a bit more Brady-like I might have pulled back my camera and given then more room in my studio.

This is one of my favorite portraits which somehow I was lucky enough to capture by enchantment. I have never gotten over the fact that so much can happen between my camera and my subject if I only wait for the right moment to press the shutter button.



An Oboe D'Amore, A Natural Horn, A Traverso & A Pair of Bay Shoes
Sunday, December 22, 2013






Our mouths and the sound of strings
should for you
for ever and ever
prepare thanks and sacrifice.
Our hearts and minds are lifted up throughout our lives
with song,
great king to praise you.

Aria Unser Mund Ton der Saiten
Bach Cantata BWV 1


My graphic designer friend Graham Walker and I have gone to every performance of  Early Music Vancouver’s ongoing The Bach Cantata Project which began 10 years ago. Not all the concerts featured four Bach Cantatas. As an example tonight’s program include a Cantata by Bach’s predecessor as cantor at Thomaskirche in Leipzig, Johann Kuhnau (1660-1722). This would mean that we have seen/heard 35 of them. Since Bach wrote around 200 of them we have a long way to go!

But after 10 years I can safely say that I know most of the performers by their first names and I can routinely (and so can you as baroque performers put on their pants, one foot at a time) go back stage to greet them. They are really part of my Christmas season family. And Christmas is a family tradition.



Marina Hasselberg & Viola de Hoog
Both Walker and I know something that few in Vancouver seem to know. We feel smug about it and we know that even after repeated telling  people of our knowledge of this fact, that our fave centre-front-row seats will always be available to us.

There are some (mostly conservative Canadians) who feel that they must sit at the middle of the middle to get the best sound. They just might be right if they want to hear an overall sound. They might be right if they have sensitive eardrums and do not want to sit front row to hear the VSO play Ravel’s Bolero. I did, once and I took my Radio Shack sound level meter which at one point (I believe where the trombones kick in) marked 120 decibels.

Extremely loud sound is not a staple of a middle sized baroque orchestra. Sitting in front gives you a classic 60s stereo sound feel. It sounds much as my Acoustic Research AR-3A speakers used to sound. I feel that the sound is accurate and that the Chan’s room acoustics (good or bad as they might be) do not add to what I hear.

Up front I could enjoy what was my favourite moment of the evening. This was the bass Aria Wer bist du? Frage dein Gewissen of Bach’s Cantata BWV 132. The aria featured bass singer Sumner Thompson accompanied by Viola de Hoog on cello (Wow! Wow!), Natalie Mackie on violone and Michael Jarvis on baroque chamber organ.


Ray Nurse, Marina Hasselberg & Viola de Hoog
For those who might not know of small but interesting facts, up front I could see that the first violin’s chair had a second and extra thick cushion. Why? Marc Destrubé, the first violinist was also the conductor and the extra cushion gave him the necessary height to look upon and direct the section with the weird instruments, such as Debra Nagy and Curtiss Foster on Oboe D’Amore and Oboe Da Caccia, and Andrew Clark and Steve Denroche on natural horns (unnaturally difficult to play).

From our vantage point of the first row you might have spied Ray Nurse with his lute. The top half of his instrument is bent backwards so from where we were it looked like it had been guillotined. But just for once, and this is a most rare situation, we were able to hear the fine and very warm sound of his lute. Those "middlers" would not have heard any of it.

I can close this and write what a wonderful concert it was, which it was. And I would hope that I will be alive for the eleventh incarnation of the series next year. Walker and I get used to the usual roster of fine singers. This year we heard for the first time, tenor Aaron Sheehan pleased us and we particularly liked his German diction. We would like to see him back soon.

But I must add a bit of whimsy to it. I have a new friend, a young cellist called Marina Hasselberg who also has a group called  Novo. I met her at a Microcosmos String Quartet concert. We became facebook friends (you see facebook, note it must be written in lowercase, does have some good things).

And there she was in a smashing long black dress up front playing alongside the indomitable (and scary if she were my second grade teacher and in particular while wearing her spectacles) Viola de Hoog.


Steve Creswell
My friend Graham Walker, from our vantage point of our eyes being at the exact level with the concert floor, said, “Those are shoes!” You see Walker has developed a shoe fetish in the last few years. He wears shoes with long points. They are always highly polished.

Ray Nurse during the interval told me that Viola de Hoog is the best baroque cellist on the planet. I am trying to imagine what it must be like to be a young cellist sitting and playing next to her. At the end of the concert I watched de Hoog gently pinch Hasselberg and gave her a beaming smile.

One of the friendliest and happiest of all the performers is Seattle-based violist Steve Creswell who was wearing a red tie that stood out. I felt like Ferdinand and I wanted to charge. I didn’t but I managed to take Creswell’s portrait with my iPhone 3G.

“This represents Canadian content. I bought the tie at the Bay.”

Which is exactly where Hasselberg bought her shoes.

There are some who say that up front they see the singers' nostrils. I don't look. I just listen and now 
 thanks to Walker stare at their shoes.  



Marina Hasselberg & Viola de Hoog




     

Previous Posts
Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín

From Simple To Complex

Leaning Towards Irrelevancy

Nevertheless She Persisted - For Allan Morgan - My...

El Reloj de Arena - The Hour Glass - Jorge Luís Bo...

An Officer and a Gentleman & An Anniversary

el ayelmado tripolio que ademenos es de satén rosa...

For Susanne Tabata's Media Class At the Art Instit...

Linda Melsted - The Music in the Violin does not e...



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4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

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6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

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7/19/15 - 7/26/15

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8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

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8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17