A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Doña Petrona de Gandulfo
Saturday, April 18, 2015



Linda Lorenzo as Doña Petrona de Gandulfo, Vancouver 1999


What is coin of the realm really applies to the time when it is in our conscience.
In 1976 Spanish-born writer (he lives in Mexico City) Paco Ignacio Taibo II started a series of novels featuring a private detective (who lives in Mexico City) called Belascoarán Shayne. You soon learn that Shayne loves to listen to Gerry Mulligan.

Most anybody under 30 today would not have a clue as to who this man (Gerry Mulligan) is (was).
As a young man I remember seeing the wonderful TV series Meeting of Minds with Steve Allen in which he had famous people from the past as guests. They were all actors and Allen’s wife Jane Meadows played Cleopatra. She shared dinner with Thomas Aquinas, Thomas Paine and Theodore Roosevelt. Telling just about anybody under 30 about this would draw a blank.

For a generation of Argentines of my age (72) we all knew about a woman called Doña Petrona de Gandulfo. In the 50s no housewife would cook anything without consulting the Julia Child of Argentina.

In 1999 when Nora Patrich, her husband Juan Manuel Sánchez (both artists) and I embarked on expressing our nostalgia for Argentine with paint, pencil and silver halides I wanted to do something in relation to Doña Petrona. Our lovely (an understatement) Argentine subject Linda Lorenzo played the part in Nora’s Kitchen. Note in the picture the image of Che Guevara. Patrich is most definitely on the extreme left in her views. Lorenzo is holding one of Nora’s mates and she is wearing absolutely nothing under the kitchen apron.


Roxana as Doña Petrona de Gandulfo - Buenos Aires 2013

It was only today that sifting through my pictures and checking with my internal Blogger search engine (I was looking for any references to Doña Petrona) that I I found a blog in which Roxana, an Argentine model (I found her through Model Mayhem) posed for me as Doña Petrona in September 2013 in Nora’s house in Buenos Aires. And it was only today that I noticed that the kitchen apron 14 years later is the same one!

It is my guess that the 2013 ghost of Doña Petrona was not wearing anything else under that apron.

It important for me to note here is that both photographs show a water kettle. In Argentine Spanish that's a pava. To drink mate one must first boil water (a bit this side of boiling). Note, too that in the lower photo Nora has, on the right, a photograph of Eva Perón.

Roxana as Alfonsina Storni 
Homero Simpson dijo una vez 
Embates y oscilaciones



The Alienation Of My Present
Friday, April 17, 2015




Linda Lorenzo with Nora's ostrich egg

Enajenado (the Spanish word for alienated) has been very much in my thoughts of late as I fight (futile it seems to be) a sense that I am living in a world in which my corner garden is the only world I feel more or less part of. 

As I drive around the city I know of the buildings that once were this or that but have been replaced by new ones for which I have no connection. If I were a migrating bird I would still not lose my way as memory would serve me well.

It was only about a week ago that I had to pick up my friend, Portland bassist Curtis Daily at his hotel, the Barclay on Robson. Because of the mess that is Hemlock Street I had to go on a roundabout way which somehow took me past Denman, Davie and finally to Robson. I could in my memory remember the drag queens that paraded in the early 80s and that the West End now is unrecognizable to me. 




When I visit my friend Paul in Richmond the perversity, and diversity of Chinese characters on all signs make me feel that the conundrum of the Forbidden City, of ancient and remote China is now paradoxically more so and more inscrutable to my understanding than ever before.

I remember going with my mother when I was 8 to the house of the Chinese diplomats then in Buenos  Aires and being exposed to strange food and the even stranger (to me) Chinese spoon. Even then I was dazzled by its beauty.

In the 80s I would stop to look at Russian Ladas parked on the street. It seemed to me that even the metal used was alien to anything I had ever seen. Now with Big Macs tasting the same in Mexico City, Vancouver and even  in Saigon I find that my former alienation on what was foreign was kind of a comforting thing. It showed a diversity in a world of diversity.

Now the sameness of my present (sameness in that I feel left out by it all) makes me yearn (a word I have not used for years) for the comforting strangeness of the country I was born in.  

When I perused Linda Lorenzo’s thick file and looked at the pictures I took using Nora Patrich’s trophy Argentine ostrich (ñandú) egg I felt that emptiness of being alive in the wrong place in the wrong time.

Memories of saddling up a horse (two or three sheepskins cinched on with primitive wooden stirrups), of riding off alone (I would have been 11) into the vast Argentine Pampa in search of avestruces that would suddenly pop up from the high grass to lure me away from their eggs. It was exciting to gallop after them. I would not have known what to do had one confronted me.I was always careful to keep my horse from stepping on the nest. The eggs had a powerful smell that Argentines call catinga. Far more pleasant was the smell of the rich and humid soil and the noise of the nearby teros (a beautiful Argentine bird) has returned to my present as I write this.  





Linda Lorenzo is now a widowed mother. Nora Patrich is back in Buenos Aires (she must have returned with the egg). And I am here feeling less and less like I belong here and more and more I miss my Argentine family, my mother, my father and yes that rustling of the grass when the ostrich would suddenly stand and run towards that horizon that was never marred by even a measly hill. Sometimes that horizon would be interrupted by that Pampas tree, the Ombú under whose shade I would rest my horse, not knowing that someday I would return, in my thoughts, to that comforting shade from a city, cold and alien with its almost eternal cyan skies.



A Pocket Version of Handel & Telemann's Wassermusik
Thursday, April 16, 2015



Alexander Weimann - April 15 2015

I have a vivid memory of listening for the first time a cassette tape of Pablo Casals conducting the Marlboro Festival Orchestra of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos. The second concerto featuring the trumpet was played so fast I thought my tape player had broken. To this day this super-fast version (was Casals on amphetamines?) is my favourite and all others seem now as if they were recorded in slow motion. Could more surprises be in store? Perhaps.

I can no longer abide any version of Bach’s Concerto for 2 Violins in D minor, BWV 1043. The same goes for Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. I have heard them too many times. This is why I look forward to the Portland Baroque Orchestra with Monica Huggett tackling the Four Seasons at the Chan Centre on May 1st courtesy of Early Music Vancouver. A woman with fearsome forearms and a passion to match will enliven the work.

You might think that the same (concerto ennui)  might apply to the sometimes bombastic-sounding (as lovely as it is) Water Music by Handel. ThePacific Baroque Orchestra under the direction of Alexander Weimann is performing it this Friday and Saturday. So what may be new? Plenty!

Below is the citation from Wikipedia:

The Water Music is a collection of orchestral movements, often published as three suites, composed by George Frideric Handel. It premiered on 17 July 1717 after King George I had requested a concert on the River Thames.

The Water Music is scored for a relatively large orchestra, making it suitable for outdoor performance. Some of the music is also preserved in arrangement for a smaller orchestra; this version is not suitable for outdoor performance, as the sound of stringed instruments does not carry well in the open air.


Georg Frideric Handel (left) and King George I on the Thames River, 17 July 1717. Painting by Edouard Hamman (1819–88).

When I read the above I became curious as all the versions of Handel’s Water Music I have ever heard featured a large orchestra with lots of pomp and circumstance provided by horns, trumpets and 18th century kitchen sinks. It seems that there is a smaller version.

This is what I found:

It’s easy to imagine the well-documented first performance of Handel’s Water Music, played by at least 50 musicians on a barge floating down the Thames for a royal procession. But what was the score’s first incarnation? After all, Baroque composers would shamelessly beg, borrow and steal from their own music, whatever it took to make a few extra bob.

Enter the Brook Street Band, a young baroque chamber ensemble whose core make-up is two violins, harpsichord and cello. Upon learning of a chamber version of the Water Music in an Oxford University library, apparently penned by Handel himself, the group applied 18th century practices and adapted the music for their own forces, adding an oboe doubling on recorder. The resulting world premier recording recreates how Handel’s popular music may have been enjoyed by 18th century folk in the privacy of their own home.

From the above web site I found out that the Brook Street Band is called that because they took their name from the London street where Handel lived for most of his life in London.

Is there any chance we might ever hear something like the above in an intimate location (Pyatt Hall on Seymour Street for example)?

You might never know by the following information on the concert on the Pacific Baroque Orchestra web site:

A lavish collection of orchestral suites for woodwinds and strings by Handel (Watermusic) and Telemann (A lavish collection of orchestral suites for woodwinds and strings by Handel (Watermusic) and Telemann (Hamburger Ebb' und Fluth, La Bourse) celebrating the water and its powerful tides, both literally and as a metaphor for change. Majestic music at the end of our season for a city that lives from and with water.) celebrating the water and its powerful tides, both literally and as a metaphor for change. Majestic music at the end of our season for a city that lives from and with water.


I am happy to report that something like that Oxford version is in the works for Friday and Saturday.

I know this because yesterday Wednesday I attended a rehearsal of the Pacific Baroque Orchestra. The orchestra featured (all period instruments) one harpsichord (Weimann) two violins, Chloe Myers and Linda Melsted, one viola, Paul Luchkow, one bassoonist, Katrina Russell, two oboes, Matthew Jennejohn  and Curtis Forster, that doubled on recorders, one violone player Natalie Mackie, and  Nathan Whittaker on cello.

It was most interesting to watch and listen to Weimann make some of the musicians go silent or to listen to violinists who were a bit confused as to what part they might play as they (one violinist, the second violinist ) was replacing two. Weimann informed that oboe players that he would bring the horn parts for Thursday. In many instances some of the players did have confusing moments when they were unsure which part of the two parts they had to play. At all times I was under the impression that the 9 musicians were all collaborating, on the spot on a work that will be brand new. Weimman, and the 8 were putting together a Vancouver Version (not the Oxford!) of Handel’s Water Music.

As the only spectator I felt very much like George I in his palace listening to an intimate chamber orchestra play beautiful music. It seemed they were playing just for me.

It was wonderful, refreshing, to hear every individual instrument play and not a full orchestra with the instruments blending in. If anything there were times when Weimann seemed to be going for clashes and he often said these two parts sound the same and so would change the mix. To me I was listening to something being re-born.

As for Telemann’s  Hamburger Ebb' und Fluth, La Bourse in honour of the German port of Hamburg I know a lot less and my only reference is my CD by Musica Antiqu Köln. In the last few years Georg Philipp Telemann seems to have been all but ignored  by orchestras in our city, a city which lies by the water. I even wonder if any contemporary (this century) or last century composers of Vancouver city have ever composed anything about our water and our frequent rain.

Alexander Weimann & Chloe Myers

Thanks to the Pacific Baroque Orchestra I can celebrate water if for a few hours in the dry and intimate surrounding of Pyatt Hall on Saturday. Those living near or in Langley can take their dose of intimacy on Friday..

As I left the rehearsal hall I thought of Weimann the German who smiles (even if a tad efficiently but I must add so naturally) and that his nation has an excellent track record of making powerful and compact statements. They have done it with their formidable (but smallish) pocket battleships of WWII, their Leicas and now Weimann is doing it with a pocket version of Handel’s Water Music. The same will apply to Telemann’s work. In my Musica  Antiqua  Köln I counted 23 musicians. Imagine 9.









How Images Affected Me
Wednesday, April 15, 2015





I believe that it is impossible to take a photograph without knowing that something similar came before. If the photographer studies other photographers (contemporary or from the past), painters, sculptors, musicians, writers, plays, operas and film these art forms can provide a starting point for inspiration. Inspiration can be out and out imitation but soon the photographer will adapt the style of the former into a personal style of the latter.

My journey into photography began when I was 8 or 9 and my mother took me to the Lincoln Library on Calle Florida in Buenos Aires. The library run by the United States Information Service was a front for the CIA. Often the library was subjected to bomb scares or met with university students holding signs and or shouting “Yankees, fuera de la Argentina”.

One of the singular surprises of this library is that with proper documentation (and easy process) you could take books home! Even today in Latin America people must read library books at the library! My mother left me at a table and by random choice I picked up a book or magazine called American Heritage. In it I found b+w photographs of soldiers and officers of the American Civil War taken by Mathew Brady, Alexander Gardiner and Timothy O’Sullivan. The men in the photographs looked very much like the men and young men walking on Florida. But it hit me for the first time (my first awareness of mortality) that the men in the photographs had been dead for at least 86 years. I have been obsessed in my interest in everything related to that war and the photographers and illustrators (like Winslow Homer).

By age 13 I had read a book on Grant’s role in the Battle of Shiloh. Last year I read the excellent Mathew Brady biography by Robert Wilson. The portraits of ordinary people (not soldiers but probably well off) who posed for Brady in his NY studio so inspired me that I decided to imitate their look. I did this by mounting a large soft box on a tall boom stand in my garden (a cloudy day). I placed a gray backdrop behind and posed my friend and model Caitlin Legault. The photograph which I took with b+w film with a medium format camera I believe at the very least captured the spirit of Brady’s technique.

The other boxes below represent only a few of the people who have influenced my photography and helped me develop (through inspiration and outright imitation) what I consider the Holy Grail of photography. And that is a personal style.

The photograph of Iggy Pop is not all that similar to that of Goebbels. When I was about to photograph  Mr. Pop (!) I mentioned that in his black suit he reminded me of the famous portrait taken by Alfred Aisenstaedt. Pop became agitated and told me he had been in the very house in Geneva a year  before.

Of Canadian author Robertson Davies I had seen countless photographs of the man posing with his glasses in his mouth. I opted into turning him into my childhood idol, Da Vinci.

Most of the other box/panels are self-explanatory. But I would like to add something to the one of Degas. My granddaughter when young posed by the Degas Ballerina Aged 14 at the National Gallery in Washington DC. When I found out that the lovely Sandrine Cassini (when I photographed her she was with Ballet BC) had started her dance career at the Paris Opera Ballet (just like Marie van Goethem, the model for the Degas sculpture) I could not resist. Cassini then revealed that from the Paris Opera Ballet she had gone to the Monaco Ballet. I simply asked her, "Did he photograph you?" Her answer pleasantly surprised me. "Yes Helmut Newton photographed me.".
 
























An American Tune At The Fox, El Greco & Purism
Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Add Top, Tom Berghan, right glasses John Reischman, with cap Brandon Vance, Stephen Stubbs & Catherine Webster

Catherine Webster & Stephen Stubbs at the Fox Cabaret Photomat April 14 2015


On April 14 I attended a performance of An American Tune at the Fox Cabaret. It was a co-production between Music on Main and Early MusicVancouver.

The concert in the revamped and cleaned up former porno film theatre (it is still a happily but lurid red) was not your ordinary concert.







We live in a city that specializes in purism. I thought the word did not exist but I looked it up. My Wikipedia informed me as follows:

Purism, referring to the arts, was a movement that took place between 1918–1925 that influenced French painting and architecture. Purism was led by Amédée Ozenfant and Charles Edouard Jeanneret (Le Corbusier).

The Wikipedia citing warns you that it contains only one source and it lists some interesting rules put forward by Ozenfant and Le Corbusier:

Purism does not intend to be a scientific art, which it is in no sense.

Cubism has become a decorative art of romantic ornamentism.

There is a hierarchy in the arts: decorative art is at the base, the human figure at the summit.

Painting is as good as the intrinsic qualities of its plastic elements, not their  representative or narrative possibilities.

Purism wants to conceive clearly, execute loyally, exactly without deceits; it abandons troubled conceptions, summary or bristling executions. A serious art must banish all techniques not faithful to the real value of the conception.

Art consists in the conception before anything else.

Technique is only a tool, humbly at the service of the conception.

Purism fears the bizarre and the original. It seeks the pure element in order to reconstruct organized paintings that seem to be facts from nature herself.

The method must be sure enough not to hinder the conception.

Purism does not believe that returning to nature signifies the copying of nature.

It admits all deformation is justified by the search for the invariant.

All liberties are accepted in art except those that are unclear.


As I read these rules and particularly the last one I wondered if these rules were that serious or if there was some tongue in cheek element. The reason for my surmise is that Vancouver is not really a city of purists. To be a purist, within limits, is a good thing. But to be a purist who loves ballet and will not attend a performance of Contact Improvisational Dance to me smacks of Purism.

For a long time those in the early music movements have been ruled (so some think) by a cadre of inflexible arbiters who state that cellos should have no endpins and violins no chin rests. The musicians sometimes play standing up and they disdain the violin solos of the 19th century mainstream (in our city) repertoire. I may be overstating this but who would not listen to Lalo’s Symphonie espagnole Op 21 or Sarasate’s Zigeunerweisen played with a modern violin?

A man, a Vancouver man, violinist Marc Destrubé has never had a conflict with playing and enjoying any good music for the violin. He is just as happy playing Buxtehude as he is playing Bartók. As he is a purist, he plays the former with a Baroque violin and the latter with a modern violin.

I distinctly remember going to a concert of the PacificBaroque Orchestra (it was held, I believe in a church on 33d Avenue near Granville) that featured some of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos. One of them was Number 3. For this concert Destrubé had commissioned a then sort of unknown contemporary composer, Bradshshaw Pack who had previously excelled in the playing of the electric guitar. His composition Arioso Distante had the same instrumentation as the Brandenburg 3 (3 violins, 3 violas, 3 cellos and one bass). You can find it here in the album Alogos http://www.spoolmusic.com/spp201info.html. It was played with baroque instruments and the piece was dissonant. I remember that Pack told me after the concert, “I am pretty happy only a couple of people walked out.”

Matthew White, Artistic Director of Early Music Vancouver has teamed up with Music on Main to bring concerts that are not for your typical Vancouver purist but for real purists who disdain putting music in inflexible categories.

A concert that featured Josh Reischman on an assortment of mandolins, Stephen Stubbs (a baroque specialist and lutenist) playing a normal modern guitar, Tom Berghan on several kinds of banjos, Brandon Vance, listed as an Irish Fiddler, Tekla Cunningham, a Seattle baroque violinist playing a Baroque Sanctus Seraphim, Venice 1746 instrument. (Cunningham told me, “ We used the baroque instruments because in the 19th century they would have used something transitional most likely and certainly with gut strings.”) We had a singer, too, soprano Catherine Webster who does specialize in the Baroque. She seemed to fit in quite well with the eclectic orchestra wearing a dress and cowboy boots, Texan style. Unlike many of the Texan women I have known she was not chewing gum.



The concert featured principally music by American composer Stephen Foster and composers like Richard Milburn, Daniel Emmett, Henry C. Work, George Frederick Root.

Most haunting were the Murder Ballads with lyrics about women being murdered by jealous sisters of for no reason at all by a man.


Close-up of Dead Woman with Blood - Anonymous Dagureotype circa 1843 from Sleeping Beauty -Memorial Photography in America

The tone of the concert set in the 19th century had a feel of the Old South, of Lincoln at war (the concert was held on the anniversary of his assassination) and for me the atmoshpere of Stephen Crane’s novel The Red Badge of Courage and the gothic stories of my fave Ambrose Bierce.

Had I previously known about the flavour of the concert I might have brought books featuring soldiers of the American Civil War or that lovely but troubling Sleeping Beauty – Memorial Photography in America by Stanley B. Burns, M.D.

Before the concert I asked Stephen Stubbs if they were playing the Battle Hymn of the Republic seeing that they had Daniel Emmett’s I wish I was in Dixie. His answer was confusing as he told me, “We are playing a sombre version of George Frederick Root’s Battle Cry of Freedom. The Battle Cry and the Battle Hymn are not the same at all.

In the notes I read that New Orleans composer and virtuoso pianist Louis Moreau Gottshalk would have preferred it to be the American National Anthem.

In spite of my otherwise musical ignorance this fact gave me a touch of pleasure. I had a great aunt in the Philippines, Buenaventura Gálvez Puig who was a concert pianist in Manila in the beginning of the 20th century who played Gottshalk and I still have some of his sheet music in my possession.

The concert was delightful and more so because fiddler Brandon Vance added lots of percussion with his spirited foot stomping. I asked him about the “is it a fiddle or a violin?” controversy. Vance was diplomatic and did not tell me what I have always thought and that is that violinists can call their instruments fiddles but we the unwashed masses cannot and must always say, “violin”. He drew the line in calling a bow a stick, “It is a bow and never a stick.” There were other strange percussion instruments, including a washboard and what looked like a bunch of bamboo skewers.

Coming up in the Fox Cabaret series is J.S. Bachwards -Early Music From the Future For Solo Violin with Jaron Freeman-Fox and Marc Destrubé on violins on May 5th at 8PM. The previous Fox Cabaret concert was this one. with Alexander Weimann and tenor Charles Daniels.

This sort of programming will perhaps help us all Vancouverites to be less practitioners of purism.

During the whole concert I thought mandolin player John Reischman was channeling any one of the dour subjects of El Greco.I wondered if Catherine Webster was wearing bobby socks in thoese cowboy boots.














     

Previous Posts
Sandrine Cassini On My Red Psychiatric Couch

The Paris Opera Ballet & Alonso King Lines Ballet

Sandrine Cassini - A Soon-to-be Visit by an Appari...

The Clubhouse On Second

Sound Holes

Faded - Recovered - Scanned - Delight

El Absurdo Infinito

Miss D, My Chickering Baby Grand & Fuji FP-100C

Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín



Archives
1/15/06 - 1/22/06

1/22/06 - 1/29/06

1/29/06 - 2/5/06

2/5/06 - 2/12/06

2/12/06 - 2/19/06

2/19/06 - 2/26/06

2/26/06 - 3/5/06

3/5/06 - 3/12/06

3/12/06 - 3/19/06

3/19/06 - 3/26/06

3/26/06 - 4/2/06

4/2/06 - 4/9/06

4/9/06 - 4/16/06

4/16/06 - 4/23/06

4/23/06 - 4/30/06

4/30/06 - 5/7/06

5/7/06 - 5/14/06

5/14/06 - 5/21/06

5/21/06 - 5/28/06

5/28/06 - 6/4/06

6/4/06 - 6/11/06

6/11/06 - 6/18/06

6/18/06 - 6/25/06

6/25/06 - 7/2/06

7/2/06 - 7/9/06

7/9/06 - 7/16/06

7/16/06 - 7/23/06

7/23/06 - 7/30/06

7/30/06 - 8/6/06

8/6/06 - 8/13/06

8/13/06 - 8/20/06

8/20/06 - 8/27/06

8/27/06 - 9/3/06

9/3/06 - 9/10/06

9/10/06 - 9/17/06

9/17/06 - 9/24/06

9/24/06 - 10/1/06

10/1/06 - 10/8/06

10/8/06 - 10/15/06

10/15/06 - 10/22/06

10/22/06 - 10/29/06

10/29/06 - 11/5/06

11/5/06 - 11/12/06

11/12/06 - 11/19/06

11/19/06 - 11/26/06

11/26/06 - 12/3/06

12/3/06 - 12/10/06

12/10/06 - 12/17/06

12/17/06 - 12/24/06

12/24/06 - 12/31/06

12/31/06 - 1/7/07

1/7/07 - 1/14/07

1/14/07 - 1/21/07

1/21/07 - 1/28/07

1/28/07 - 2/4/07

2/4/07 - 2/11/07

2/11/07 - 2/18/07

2/18/07 - 2/25/07

2/25/07 - 3/4/07

3/4/07 - 3/11/07

3/11/07 - 3/18/07

3/18/07 - 3/25/07

3/25/07 - 4/1/07

4/1/07 - 4/8/07

4/8/07 - 4/15/07

4/15/07 - 4/22/07

4/22/07 - 4/29/07

4/29/07 - 5/6/07

5/6/07 - 5/13/07

5/13/07 - 5/20/07

5/20/07 - 5/27/07

5/27/07 - 6/3/07

6/3/07 - 6/10/07

6/10/07 - 6/17/07

6/17/07 - 6/24/07

6/24/07 - 7/1/07

7/1/07 - 7/8/07

7/8/07 - 7/15/07

7/15/07 - 7/22/07

7/22/07 - 7/29/07

7/29/07 - 8/5/07

8/5/07 - 8/12/07

8/12/07 - 8/19/07

8/19/07 - 8/26/07

8/26/07 - 9/2/07

9/2/07 - 9/9/07

9/9/07 - 9/16/07

9/16/07 - 9/23/07

9/23/07 - 9/30/07

9/30/07 - 10/7/07

10/7/07 - 10/14/07

10/14/07 - 10/21/07

10/21/07 - 10/28/07

10/28/07 - 11/4/07

11/4/07 - 11/11/07

11/11/07 - 11/18/07

11/18/07 - 11/25/07

11/25/07 - 12/2/07

12/2/07 - 12/9/07

12/9/07 - 12/16/07

12/16/07 - 12/23/07

12/23/07 - 12/30/07

12/30/07 - 1/6/08

1/6/08 - 1/13/08

1/13/08 - 1/20/08

1/20/08 - 1/27/08

1/27/08 - 2/3/08

2/3/08 - 2/10/08

2/10/08 - 2/17/08

2/17/08 - 2/24/08

2/24/08 - 3/2/08

3/2/08 - 3/9/08

3/9/08 - 3/16/08

3/16/08 - 3/23/08

3/23/08 - 3/30/08

3/30/08 - 4/6/08

4/6/08 - 4/13/08

4/13/08 - 4/20/08

4/20/08 - 4/27/08

4/27/08 - 5/4/08

5/4/08 - 5/11/08

5/11/08 - 5/18/08

5/18/08 - 5/25/08

5/25/08 - 6/1/08

6/1/08 - 6/8/08

6/8/08 - 6/15/08

6/15/08 - 6/22/08

6/22/08 - 6/29/08

6/29/08 - 7/6/08

7/6/08 - 7/13/08

7/13/08 - 7/20/08

7/20/08 - 7/27/08

7/27/08 - 8/3/08

8/3/08 - 8/10/08

8/10/08 - 8/17/08

8/17/08 - 8/24/08

8/24/08 - 8/31/08

8/31/08 - 9/7/08

9/7/08 - 9/14/08

9/14/08 - 9/21/08

9/21/08 - 9/28/08

9/28/08 - 10/5/08

10/5/08 - 10/12/08

10/12/08 - 10/19/08

10/19/08 - 10/26/08

10/26/08 - 11/2/08

11/2/08 - 11/9/08

11/9/08 - 11/16/08

11/16/08 - 11/23/08

11/23/08 - 11/30/08

11/30/08 - 12/7/08

12/7/08 - 12/14/08

12/14/08 - 12/21/08

12/21/08 - 12/28/08

12/28/08 - 1/4/09

1/4/09 - 1/11/09

1/11/09 - 1/18/09

1/18/09 - 1/25/09

1/25/09 - 2/1/09

2/1/09 - 2/8/09

2/8/09 - 2/15/09

2/15/09 - 2/22/09

2/22/09 - 3/1/09

3/1/09 - 3/8/09

3/8/09 - 3/15/09

3/15/09 - 3/22/09

3/22/09 - 3/29/09

3/29/09 - 4/5/09

4/5/09 - 4/12/09

4/12/09 - 4/19/09

4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17