A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Randy Rampage - 55 - February 21 2015
Saturday, February 21, 2015




Today, February 21 is Randy Rampage’s birthday. He was born 55 years ago at St. Paul’s Hospital.
The first time I saw him, up in the air, legs wide open, bass guitar in his arms I saw a wonderfully scary and angry man who was one of a few very good reasons why I would want to go to a D.O.A concert. I could have never ever guessed at the time that a friendship would grow between us and that it did not take long to find out that Rampage was not scary, not angry but a gentle and kind human being.

And so there I was tonight at his party enjoying SusanneTabata’s cooking, a fine fireplace and a friendly crowd of people with interesting things to say.


Zippy Pinhead goes to a lab for a blood test. In the waiting room there is a tall burly man (“He must work out,” Zippy said). He stares at me. I may have seen him five or six times. He could not place me but somehow he recognized my face.” When I left I said to the man, “Goodbye Bruce[Allen].”

Ferris Jak, the man with the pork pie hat in the group picture looked awfully familiar to me.

Sometime in the 80s I photographed the punk group Dayglo Abortions (formerly the Sick Fucks) in my Hamilton Street studio using black lighting. It seems Jak was their manager.

One of the women at the party, Renee Tabata, beautifully dressed in a low cut blouse and legs arrayed in fishnets, had photographed nude men for many years. Since I did this for a while in the late 70s we compared notes.

With Rampage, we shared our preference for the Rolling Stones over the Beatles. We discussed Robert Frank’s seminal 1972 documentary Cocksucker Blues.

With the appropriately-named virtuoso guitarist Duane Chaos we exchanged notes on our friends who owned strip parlours in the 80s.

Gary Taylor, only a few months older than I am (he is 73 I am 72) was hustling me about two fabulous bands he is promoting. He was wondering if either of them were blog material.

On my part I told my Zippy story. Many years ago I was with him at a Western Music Award ceremony at the Bayshore Hotel. We were indulging in some punch when a beautiful woman came up to us. She noticed Zippy’s filthy hands and said, “Your hands are filthy.” Zippy explained, “I fix cars in a shop. I put my hands into car engines. This is grease.” She then said, “What is your phone number?”

When I left, I left feeling a nice glow (I did not drink) of satisfaction that indeed while I am an old man I can enjoy an evening of guilt-free time with old friends.








Talking Stick Festival - And The Tree Of Life
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Nyla Carpentier

Talking Stick Festival Feb 17- Mar1, 2015


When I met my Canadian wife to be Rosemary Healey in Mexico City in 1967 she told me that in all her time in New Dublin, Ontario and even when she went to Queens she had never noticed any “Indians”. In fact, she further informed me the Canadian totem pole in Chapultepec Park was the first time she had ever seen such a thing.
When we came to Vancouver in 1975 I was astounded to see what I thought were Mexicans in the streets of Vancouver. Such was the level of bad information in those years of my youth that I truly thought the Japanese were yellow and the North American Indians were red. It was in 1975 that I learned that native Canadians looked very much like the natives of my Argentine homeland and of Mexico. I was perplexed that the Canadian Natives I attempted to talk to did not speak any Spanish.



Margo Kane
In my first job working at Tilden Rent-A-Car then on Alberni and Thurlow I was told not to rent cars to anybody with the surname of John or George. I soon found out what they meant. A man called Moving Rock came to rent a station wagon. I gave him one on the spot and almost lost my job! In my years as a still photographer at the CBC the only Native Canadian I ever noticed was the one who was part of the cast of the Beachcombers.

Now in 2015 I feel that I know a bit more about the original inhabitants of my adopted country. But for me, living in the city, driving on Marine Drive through the Musqueam Nation, on my way to a UBC concert at the Chan, Native Canadians are almost invisible. I rarely find information in our local media. In fact my Vancouver Sun seems to have no information on this February 17 to March 1 Talking Stick Festival.
I can assert that the many Chinese immigrants that now surround me in my neighbourhood are not in any way as exotic as my concept of the Native Canadian.

At the opening gala ceremony yesterday of the Talking Stick Festival I listened to the golden voice (not loud but with perfect diction) of Shane Pointe the master of ceremonies. I particularly liked how he gesticulated with his hands as he spoke. It seemed that everything he said was in a story form.
He mentioned how the local cedar trees are universally appreciated, loved and used by the Coastal First People. At that point I knew I had to meet up with the man and share my thoughts on the cedar.



Anybody who is a keen gardener (I am one) will know that the true cedar or Cedrus is a tree indigenous to Europe and the Himalayas. What here in Canada we call a cedar is in fact, botanically Thuja plicata or Western Red Cedar.
My Mexican poet friend Homero Aridjis says that Canadians never knew where the Monarch Butterflies wintered. He told me that he and the Mexicans of his home state of Michoacán knew this but did not know where they came from. In the same way the Coastal First People knew all about their “cedars”. It was an Englishman, William Lobb who “discovered” the Thuja plicata,. Explorer David Douglas who had “discovered” the Douglas Fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii, had somehow overlooked our Thuja.

Shane Pointe in his talk mentioned that the Thuja plicata is called the tree of life by his people. I had to tell him that another name for his tree is Arbor vitae (Latin for tree of life). I did not want to further complicate the matter by telling him that arbor vitae is the cerebellar white matter, so called for its branched, tree-like appearance in the human brain!





For me the paradox of this wonderful tree, Thuja plicata is that nothing underneath will grow. The tree defends its territory with a root system that has a caustic substance that kills many plants. If you rub your face with a thuja branch you will get welts. This tree, so lovingly and efficiently used by Native Canadians has to be treated with caution and respect. Perhaps there is in this a lesson that many of us might consider.


For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again
Living Edward Curtis Photogravure
Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun
Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas
Native Royalty

Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun - Shaman Coming to Fix the Dying Land
Acrylic on Canvas 2015 60" x 72"























One of the most pleasant surprises for me at the gala was to find that not only was there lots of traditional art and dance featured but also there was a contemporary take to aboriginal art. Dancer Nyla Carpentier accompanied by an electric guitar performed not only with skill but with a humour free of any ceremonial seriousness. I was delighted by Lawrence Paul Yuxwluptun's two works. One was a 3-D piece devoid of colour and the second one shown above made me think that I was looking at the surrealist  art of Ladislav Guderna. There was more fine work by other artists on thee wall of the Roundhouse. My only regret is that the absence of my favourite male dancer, Byron Chief-Moon was probably due to his increasing bad back problems.



Why Händel?
Tuesday, February 17, 2015


Why Händel?


Krisztina Szabó & Zachary Wilder at the Chan after performing Händel's Theodora, Feb 14 2015

 
Händel is the master of beautiful and memorable melody.  He can be so expressive and so achingly poignant with seemingly so little. And after breaking your heart with an exquisite melody in one aria, in the next moment, he gives you an aria with fiery, complicated coloratura which challenges even the best of singers.  There is never a dull moment singing Händel's music, and for me, singing Händel's music is  like the perfect gift, beautifully wrapped with an exquisite and elegant bow.

Krisztina Szabó, mezzo-soprano

 

On my long flight home, I rolled around in my head the very existential question you gave us "Why Händel?" It would be difficult to explore all the philosophical merits of the composer in one short paragraph, but I think it is worthwhile to talk about the things that make Händel special. It is remarkable that so many different cultures claim Händel for their own: the Germans, the Italians, and the English. Händel did indeed live in these three countries for a time, but I believe the reason his music has become such an important part of these national identities is because he was really a musical chameleon and a master of style. For example, when a young Händel came to Italy, he was able to immerse himself in the avant-garde musical scene of Rome and was writing works that are truly Italian at heart. By the time we get to Theodora, Händel had begun taking the best from all the styles he had absorbed (a french aria here, an italianate accompagnato there). So this, coupled with superb vocal writing, a strong sense of theater and drama, and a musical sensibility that is emotionally piercing, is what makes Händel's music so enduring!

Zachary Wilder , tenor

Alexander Weimann
I am afraid I only can come up with a very boring answer to the question "Why Händel?"; it would be the same I would give in reply to "Why Bach?", or "Why Haydn?", or "Why Mozart?" etc... They all are just fantastic musicians and left us with immortal, rather timeless compositions which open our senses towards a deeper understanding of life, the world and us.

 
Alexander Weimann – Music Director- Pacific Baroque Orchestra/harpsichordist







Theodora & Charlie Brown

Theodora - The World Have Ears And Hear Not

Why Bach?






Curtis Daily's bass




 



Grant Strate - That Elegant Man
Monday, February 16, 2015

Grant Strate 1927-2015



 
I had the certain privilege of taking the portrait of dancer/choreographer Grant Strate twice. The first time it was in September 1998 and the second time it was December 2007. My one regret considering the pleasure he gave me in sitting for me is that I never saw him dance.

But I could almost imagine. This man, Grant Strate was the only man I ever met in Vancouver who could match the grace and laid back demeanour of Arthur Erickson. For many years I played the imaginary game of being given the task of making the invitation list for a reception for a visit by the Queen of England. Always, Strate and Erickson were first on it.
Since 1998 until almost recently, at dance performances, I would notice the (always) elegantly dressed man sitting at the back of the dance hall - invariably  it was with his partner and friend choreographer/dancer Wen Wai Wang. It was not coincidental to me that the latter also had (and has) elegance (an understated one) in spades. I always stopped to enquire what he (Strate) thought of the performance. He was always kind in his answers.

It was sometime in November of 2007 that I asked Wen Wai to bring Strate to my studio on Robson and Granville. At first it seemed odd to me. Wen Wai deposited Strate on the street entrance of the building and left, but not before telling me that he would be back as soon as I finished.

 



The Barber Is Shaved
Sunday, February 15, 2015


Marina Hasselberg - Feb 14 2015 - Photograph Curtis Daily




As a photographer I am rarely in front of my camera or anybody else’s. The expression often used is, “Who shaves the barber?” In my case I can safely say that as a man (perhaps a unique unmanly one) I have never grown a beard or a moustache. I have never wanted to own a motorcycle. Of the latter I can simply assert that having studied physics and geometry I know why a tripod is a stable structure. You need three points on the ground. On a motorcycle two points on the ground are the tires and the third one, invariably, is the rider’s head.

I must admit with some late shame that my friend John Lekich and I used to give red roses to our female friends behind the bar and kitchen counter of the Railway Club. Only now I have caught on that florist red roses don’t have scent and with my interest in old roses I find them boring almost ugly.

As I realize that my maker and I have an inescapable and perhaps soon to be  finalized engagement I don’t object too much to having my picture taken. Since I am not in control I can lie back and not worry of all the possible things that can go wrong in the snapping of a picture.

The picture here with me on the edge could be an accident or simply the photographer's. It was taken by Portland bassist Curtis Daily who did not inform me when he snapped the shutter of his identical to mine, Mamiya RB-67 (but much newer) equipped with the 90mm lens which was the only lens that could accommodate cellist Marina Hasselberg’s height (she added to the effect with very high heels).
I was there to reflect back some light on Hasselberg’s fishnets. Daily thinks that photograph is very funny because he says I am obviously staring at her fishnets. Wouldn’t you?




The look of the image is the result of scanning the peel from a Fuji Instant 3200 ISO film. It tends to semi solarize (accurately it’s called the Sabattier Effect). After I scan it I reverse it in Photoshop from the semi negative to a semi positive. The slightly blue/gray colour of the peel reverses into the magenta you see here.



     

Previous Posts
Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín

From Simple To Complex

Leaning Towards Irrelevancy

Nevertheless She Persisted - For Allan Morgan - My...

El Reloj de Arena - The Hour Glass - Jorge Luís Bo...

An Officer and a Gentleman & An Anniversary

el ayelmado tripolio que ademenos es de satén rosa...

For Susanne Tabata's Media Class At the Art Instit...

Linda Melsted - The Music in the Violin does not e...



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12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17