A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Les Wiseman & His Argentinian Lensman
Saturday, February 01, 2020





Perhaps my only moment of fame or, that very least to feel important, (and so important these days if those moments are seen in retrospect) is when I went to Acapulco to photograph and interview the Chief of the Federal Police of the city for Vancouver Magazine. Was this a Vancouver Magazine kind of story? Editor Malcolm Parry was much less insular that magazine editors of his time. The slim connection with Licenciado Felipe Ferrer Junco was that he and I had been neighbours in Mexico City and when he lived in Veracruz he took me on a tour of the brothels where I met the Veracruz Police Chief. At the time Ferrer Junco was not involved with police matters. He was a good government lawyer. It was his wife who carried a Smith & Wesson in her purse. She was a body guard for politicians.

When I arrived at the Acapulco airport the custom’s officer told me I could not bring in the professional photographic equipment I had without a government permit. I told him I did not need such a permit. The man got surly. I told him to turn around. Behind him was Felipe Ferrer Junco accompanied by a plainclothes man holding an AK-47. The surly man did not apologize but let me pass. I felt like king of the world.

Now our (not mine) idea of feeling great is to have gone to some concert to see a band in which one of its members has died. And you post on social media how this person was a fave. Or you might point out that you were once served at a Dairy Queen by a woman who in later years was murdered. Fame is now latching on to ambulance chasing. And the best is when you win out over the local media (obituaries appear late or not at all) and post in Facebook, “So and so died today!”

In today’s February 3 2020 New York Times I read that Andy Gill died on Saturday. I did not have a clue who the man was until I noticed that the title of the obituary included “Gang of Four guitarist”.

In the late 70s writer Les Wiseman (he was hip then when the word hip meant something) worked for Vancouver Magazine. He also wrote a monthly column about local and international (if they happened to come to perform in town) rock bands called In One Ear. My knowledge of rock was as detailed as Wiseman’s was of Argentine (where I was born) history. But I was assigned to him and was instantly dubbed by him as “This is Lenso my Argentinian lensman”. 

So widely read was his rock column that he had credibility supreme with the then all-powerful record reps. We soon figured out that shooting bands while performing at the Commodore produced boring photographs. There was only one way to inject a visible difference. This was to photograph the performing bands with studio lights backstage. Wisman demanded this (diplomatically) and we were always given the green light. We almost had to wear sunglasses so we would not be recognized in the street. We, or at the very least Wiseman) were important big fish in Vancouver's small pond.

One of the bands that posed for us and followed my instructions was the Gang of Four.

I have no memory of the concert. I have no memory of their accents or what anyone of them told me. If you put one of their records on, I know I would not be able to identify them. Perhaps, a maybe, as the NY Times obituary is very detailed about Andy Gill’s guitar playing as is Wiseman's in the link above..

And since I never went to Manchester I was never able to spot Gill in a bus and tell you now how he was one of my favourite rock performers and how sad I am that he is gone.



Mujer en Azul
Friday, January 31, 2020

Olena - La Mujer Azul

No, no tiene nada que ver con la famosa pintura de Pablo Picasso del mismo nombre. Pero me gusta el título. Anteriormente Olena tenía su pelo de color azul. La Mujer en Azul del pintor tiene poco azul y mi fotografía de blanco y negro nada. Pero le agregué el color porque sí.



Felix Villatton - Painter of Disquiet
Thursday, January 30, 2020





On January 26 a show of the Works of Felix Vallotton closed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The introduction to the show read:

Félix Vallotton: Painter of Disquiet presents pivotal moments in the artist's career as a painter and printmaker. Painted portraits, luminous landscapes, and interior narratives that pulse with psychological tension join the exhibition from more than two dozen lenders. Swiss-born and Paris-educated, Vallotton (1865–1925) created lasting imagery of fin-de-siècle Paris.

I knew about the show because I had read a preview in my NY Times. When I read it in a preview in late October I happened to know who the artist was because of a postcard.

In the mid-90s I had a wonderful subject that I photographed who would send me suggestions on how to proceed with a mailed postcard. When I received the one here I found another woman to pose for us. My friend Grant Simmons then skilfully placed my photograph on the postcard with a to me seamless result.



In the mid-90s I was doing lots of work for the Globe and Mail. It was not only for the arts section (I would work in tandem with then arts reporter Christopher Dafoe) but also for the business side of the paper. The folks at the Globe were open to many of my ideas as they always gave me lots of lead time.  One of them involved artist Rodney Graham. I asked the Globe art director to respect the crop that I was sending them. They did. This time with a 1995 techie startup called Totally Hip I ran out of luck. The new company had as a logo a cartoon cat. It did not take too much of imagination for me to think of Felix Vallotton’s Donne nude con gatti (1898). The two gentlemen (whose name I have long forgotten) came to my studio. Grant Simmons performed his magic.



I received an urgent phone call from the art director who told me that the folks who made decisions had nixed my idea. I was further told to reshoot the men in a café in Yaletown. To me it was a disappointment as in many



Thinking back it may have been 1995 when periodicals began to lose their search of the unusual and then would settle on the hum drum.




A Secret Service not a Brothel For Spies
Wednesday, January 29, 2020


Jerome Charyn, 2018 -  New York City


One of my boiler plate tests for determining if I will read a novel is the first and last paragraph peek before I purchase a book. Sometimes if the book is a mystery I refrain from the second part.

I have a friend who happens to be a writer. Below (eventually) I will note the books he has published from his Wikipedia reference. Jerome Charyn gives Joyce Carol Oates a run for her money!

My discovery of Charyn was an accident in the early 90s. I was looking for a book by Raymond Chandler at Duthie's, a Vancouver bookstore. That’s when I noticed him. I was soon a fan of the Pink Commish and the Portuguese Jews of his police procedurals set in New York City. From there I went to all the others he had written. I knew I was onto a good thing as my friend George Bowering, Canada’s first  Poet Laureate has every book Charyn has ever written.

In 1995 I visited Charyn in New York for a Vancouver literary magazine. It was at a bookstore at Rockefeller Center that I found and thoroughly enjoyed the best non-fiction book (in my estimation) about New York, Metropolis (1984). Im it learmed that Charyn, an extremely handsome man, would sit on the steps of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I did the same, but no wonderful woman approached me.

Once the Pink Commish became the President of the United States in Winter Warning, 2017 I was wowed by anything Charyn would write next. After all in The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson , 2010 and I Am Abraham: ANovel of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War, 2014 he made a startling change in his novel writing by producing what I call “first person” autobiographical novels. Charyn was criticized by some for daring to put himself in the shoes of a woman (Emily Dickinson’s) and his friend, Joyce Carol Oates came to his defense.


Lenore Riegel & Jerome Charyn  & Ketzl - Greenwich Village - 2018


In 2018 my Rosemary and I visited Charyn and his wife Leonore Riegel where I met his cat. By then he had finished his first person autobiographical novel The Perilous Adventures of the Cowboy King: A Novel of Teddy Roosevelt and His Times, 2019 and I was able to find the connection between Isaac Sidel’s (the Pink Commish) and Teddy Roosevelt (who was a New York City police commissioner) a desk which Charyn has promised me to one day take me to see it.




In the mail a couple of weeks ago I received his latest (he does not write many of these) spy thriller  Cesare : a Novel of War-Torn Berlin.

I gave it my first and last paragraph test:

February 11, 1943
From the desk of Admiral Wilhelm Canaris
72-76 Tirpitz-Ufer
Berlin

They did not want to hear anything but the latest news about Cesare. That’s how bad the war was going. And the bombings over Berlin had started again after the quietus of a year. They were frightened, these wives of generals and diplomats. I shouldn’t have been here. I ran a secret service, not a brothel for spies.

“Herr Admiral,” they said, “is he phantom of flesh?”

And I had no reply, “Gnädige Frau, I cannot discuss my agents.”

But it was the talk of Berlin. How Captain Erik Holdermannofte Abwehr had strangled a notorious traitor in a room full of Goyas at the Prado.


And last page:

He took her in his arms, danced to the subtle screams of Jewish Jazz, her body caught in the clarinetist’s cry, and it didn’t matter to Erik what material she was made of – ashes or solid bone. Hansel and Gretel would have to wait. He was never going to leave this club.


Jerome Charyn's Literary Output - Wikipedia



Bibliography



Isaac Sidel series


    Blue Eyes, Simon & Schuster, 1975
    Marilyn the Wild, Arbor House, 1976
    The Education of Patrick Silver, Arbor House, 1976
    Secret Isaac, Arbor House, 1978
    The Good Policeman, Mysterious Press, 1990
    Maria's Girls, Warner Books, 1992
    Montezuma's Man, Warner Books, 1993
    Little Angel Street, Warner Books, 1995
    El Bronx, Warner Books, 1997
    Citizen Sidel, Mysterious Press, 1999
    Under the Eye of God, Mysterious Press and Open Road Media, 2012
    Winter Warning: An Isaac Sidel Novel, Pegasus Books, October, 2017
    The Isaac Quartet, Four Walls Eight Windows, 2002 (Omnibus of the first four Sidel novels)

Other novels

    Once upon a Droshky, McGraw-Hill, 1964
    On the Darkening Green, McGraw-Hill, 1965
    The Man Who Grew Younger, Harper & Row, 1967
    Going To Jerusalem, Viking, 1967
    American Scrapbook, Viking, 1969
    Eisenhower, My Eisenhower, Holt, 1971
    The Tar Baby, Holt, 1973
    The Franklin Scare, Arbor House, 1977
    The Seventh Babe, Arbor House, 1979
    The Catfish Man, Arbor House, 1980
    Darlin' Bill, Arbor House, 1980
    Panna Maria, Arbor House, 1982
    Pinocchio's Nose, Arbor House, 1983
    War Cries Over Avenue C, Donald I. Fine, 1985
    Paradise Man, Donald I. Fine, 1987
    Elsinore, Warner Books, 1991
    Back to Bataan, Farrar, Straus (for younger readers), 1993
    Death of a Tango King, New York University Press, 1998
    Captain Kidd, St. Martin's Press, 1999
    Hurricane Lady, Warner Books, 2001
    The Green Lantern, Thunder's Mouth Press, 2004
    Johnny One-Eye: A Tale of the American Revolution, W.W.Norton, 2008
    The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson, W.W.Norton, 2010
    I Am Abraham: A Novel of Lincoln and the Civil War. W. W. Norton & Company. 3 February 2014. ISBN 978-0-87140-427-5.
    Jerzy: A Novel, Bellevue Literary Press, March, 2017
    The Perilous Adventures of the Cowboy King: A Novel of Teddy Roosevelt and His Times, Liveright, 2019

Short stories and collections (selected)

    The Man Who Grew Younger and Other Stories, Harper, 1967
    Bitter Bronx: Thirteen Stories, Liveright Publishing Corporation, 2015, ISBN 9780871404893
    "The Blue Book of Crime," in The New Black Mask, Harcourt Brace, 1986
    "Fantomas in New York", in A Matter of Crime, Harcourt Brace, 1988
    "Young Isaac," in The Armchair Detective, 1990
    "Lorelei". Atlantic Monthly Summer Fiction Issue. Summer 2010.
    "Silk & Silk". Narrative Magazine's. October 2010.
    "Adonis" in The American Scholar, Winter, 2011 Issue
    "Little Sister". Atlantic Monthly Fiction Issue. 2011.
    Alice's Eyes
    The Paperhanger's Wife
    "Archie and Mehitabel". The American Scholar, Fiction. Summer 2012.
    The Major Leaguer

Comics (selected)

    Family Man, art by Joe Staton, lettering by Ken Bruzenak, Paradox Press, 1995

Non-fiction

    Metropolis: New York as Myth, Marketplace and Magical Land, Putnam's, 1986
        Translated and adapted into French by Cécile Bloc-Rodot – New York : Chronique d'une ville sauvage, coll. Découvertes Gallimard (nº 204), Paris: Gallimard, 1994 (also translated into Spanish, Italian, Korean and simplified Chinese, as translated from the French version)
    Movieland: Hollywood and the Great American Dream Culture, Putnam's, 1989, New York University Press, 1996
    The Dark Lady from Belorusse, St. Martin's Press, 1997
    Hemingway : Portrait de l'artiste en guerrier blessé, coll. Découvertes Gallimard (nº 371), Paris: Gallimard, 1999
        Trad. into traditional Chinese by Chʻên Li-chʻing Hai Ming Wei: Shang hên lei lei tê wên hsüeh lao ping, collection "Fa hsien chih lü" (vol. 57), Taipei: China Times Publishing, 2001
    The Black Swan, St. Martin's Press, 2000
    Sizzling Chops & Devilish Spins: Ping-Pong and the Art of Staying Alive, Four Walls Eight Windows, 2001
    Bronx Boy: A Memoir. St. Martin's Press. 11 April 2002. ISBN 978-0-312-27810-6.
    Gangsters & Gold Diggers: Old New York, the Jazz Age, and the Birth of Broadway, Four Walls Eight Windows, 2003
    Savage Shorthand: The Life and Death of Isaac Babel. Random House Publishing Group. 18 December 2007. ISBN 978-0-307-43179-0.
    Inside the Hornet's Head: an anthology of Jewish American Writing, Thunder's Mouth Press, 2005
    Raised by Wolves: The Turbulent Art and Times of Quentin Tarantino, Thunder's Mouth Press, 2005
    Marilyn : La dernière déesse, Découvertes Gallimard (n° 517), Gallimard, 2007
        Marilyn: The Last Goddess [an illustrated biography of Marilyn Monroe from Abrams Discoveries series], Abrams, 2008
    Joe DiMaggio: The Long Vigil, Yale University Press, American Icon series, March, 2011
    A Loaded Gun: Emily Dickinson for the 21st Century, Bellevue Literary Press, March, 2016

Selected plays and documentaries

    George (three-act play) developed at the Actors Studio, under Arthur Penn, staged readings at La Maison des Ecrivains (Paris 1988) and Ubu Repertory Theater (NY 1990)
    Empire State Building, co-writer, semi-fictional documentary broadcast by Canal Plus, (France 2008)

As editor

    Editor, The Single Voice: An Anthology of Contemporary Fiction. New York, Collier, 1969
    Editor, The Troubled Vision: An Anthology of Contemporary Short Novels and Passages. New York, Collier, 1970
    Editor, The New Mystery. New York, Dutton, 1993



Dorothy Stratten Lost & Found
Tuesday, January 28, 2020



From left to right and from top to bottom:

Ron Woodall on top of the Expo Golf Ball 1986, Joe Philliponi at the Penthouse, Dorothy Stratten 1980.
Punks in house in Victoria Drive, Johnny Thunders and girlfriend at Gary Taylor's Rock Room, M at Wreck Beach.
Dog for Vancouver Magazine article, Stripathon/car wash at the Drake Hotel, Yours truly and my half brother Enrique.

When Rosemary and I and our two daughters were living in Mexico City in the early 70s our house had a little shop I installed a carpentry tools which included a very nice table saw. I built furniture which I finished with car lacquer. Because my darkroom was the bathroom in the shop it was difficult to keep it sawdust-free.

In that shop I had a large box where I kept bits of wood which I though could be used. Every few months I would either throw it away or burn it in our fireplace.




The same sort of thing happens to photographers who have a darkroom. They (and I did) keep boxes of negatives and prints that are supposed to be filed but end up not being filed.

In our Athlone home in Kerrisdale four years ago I had many boxes of stuff. When we moved to Kitsilano I put them in my studio attic. Because the attice has the nails from the roof sticking in and it is cramped so I cannot stand in it I wear my bicycle helmet for protection.

I have not been able to find my 52mm (for most Nikon lenses) Number 25 deep  red filter which is most important to shoot Kodak Black+White Infrared Film (in discontinuance, a fine Kodak-coined word, since 2007. I have a generous quantitI have a generous quantity of this film in my freezer. But lately I have discovered a close copy of this film called Rollei Infrared Film. It resembles the Kodak film because it does not have the anti-helation layer which when the film is overexposed it produces pleasant halos around human figures. This Rollei film should be shot with that deep red filter.

In the move the filter has been lost so I must tape (it works) a Pentax-sized 49 mm to the Nikon lenses. The photo stores in Vancouver don’t carry these filters.

I went to the studio attic today in search of that filter. No filter was found but I did become curious at two large boxes full of negatives, slides and photographs. In one of the batches I found the ones you see here.



What is most interesting about the found slides is that six of them are Kodachromes. Stratten's is not quite sharp and I will have to take it to The Lab to be properly washed.




Monroe, Churchill & Stallings - From the Back
Monday, January 27, 2020


Marilyn Monroe, Bill Ray
 

Bill Ray (83), one of the last staff photographers for Life Magazine died on January 9 in Manhattan. As the portrait photographer that I define myself as I have a particular fondness for the man as one of his most famous photographs is that of Marilyn Monroe singing Happy Birthday to President Kennedy. What is unusual is that the photograph features Monroe seen from the back.



Winston Churchill - Philippe Halsman

For me this is a portrait. I believe that a portrait does not necessarily show the face. There is a tradition (at least I have observed this) of taking “portraits” from the back. My favourite portrait of Winston Churchill was taken by Philippe Halsman in Chartwell in 1951. I find it superior to Karsh’s.

In my years as a magazine photographer and particularly a photographer of dance I fell for three female dancers. One was Evelyn Hart, the second was Sandrine Cassini and the third, the subject of this blog, Lauri Stallings. Lauri Stallings, an American from Florida was hired by Ballet BC in the mid 90s. She had red hair and a style so distinctive that I could watch the Ballet BC dancers from the ankles down and I always knew which one was Stallings. Such was her ability to stand out that she was eventually let go and she reappeared directing a dance company in Atlanta. With Stallings I had a project which was to photograph the anti-ballerina. The idea was to show that female dancers were not swans, and that they sweated and were short of breath like most other humans. In our collaboration I wanted to convey that she was primarily a woman. I believe we succeeded.















Mais non, monsieur, il n’y a rien.
Sunday, January 26, 2020




In this 21st century were the old has been replaced by the digital new there is an urge by many to achieve perfect sharpness in photography.

In that 19th century when French painter Jean-Louis-Ernest Messonier was the richest artist around with his incredibly detailed paintings of Napoleon Bonaparte, another Frenchman, Joseph Nicéphore Niépce invented something which led to photography. It was his friend Louis Mandé Daguerre who with his daguerreotypes revolutionized the idea that here was something that could reveal reality in all its sharpness and detail. Messonier retired. But yet another Frenchman Édouard Manet saw that the way to compete with the detail of photography was to make paintings less so and viewers had to step back to notice detail if there was any of it. Realism was dead and Expressionism took over. An American photographer, Alfred Stieglitz then competed with Expressionism with the idea that photography could be seen as art if it were hazy. He was joined by Edward Steichen. But then in the beginning of the 20th century these two founded the Group F-64 with the idea that photographic pictorialism could be sharp.

Since then photography and painting have mutually scavenged ideas.

I found this Fujicolor Instant Film peeled negative today. It is of dancer/choreographer Sandrine Cassini lying on my vermillion psychiatric couch. It is pleasing to me because it is not sharp. The colours are odd and It is almost impossible (with my knowledge of Photoshop) to change the image to realistic colours. And that is just fine.


Oscar Wilde



“After the first glass of absinthe you see things as you wish they were. After the second you see them as they are not. Finally you see things as they really are, and that is the most horrible thing in the world. I mean disassociated. Take a top hat. You think you see it as it really is. But you don’t because you associate it with other things and ideas. If you had never heard of one before, and suddenly saw it alone, you’d be frightened, or you’d laugh. That is the effect absinthe has, and that is why it drives men mad. Three nights I sat up all night drinking absinthe, and thinking that I was singularly clear-headed and sane. The waiter came in and began watering the sawdust. The most wonderful flowers, tulips, lilies and roses, sprang up, and made a garden in the cafe. “Don’t you see them?” I said to him. “Mais non, monsieur, il n’y a rien.”



     

Previous Posts
Cringe! A Happy Belated Canada Day

Single Malt Scotch & Rosarian Delights

Roses, Clematis & Hosta Scanned II

Roses, Clematis & Hosta Scanned

Esperanza & Dixieland Jazz

Lucky, Not Blessed, A haiku over a sonnet

Inspiration in a a Chevrolete Cruze

My New Native Canadian Barbijo

Justification? Perhaps - But I Miss my Rosemary

Two Gardens of Earthy Delight



Archives
1/15/06 - 1/22/06

1/22/06 - 1/29/06

1/29/06 - 2/5/06

2/5/06 - 2/12/06

2/12/06 - 2/19/06

2/19/06 - 2/26/06

2/26/06 - 3/5/06

3/5/06 - 3/12/06

3/12/06 - 3/19/06

3/19/06 - 3/26/06

3/26/06 - 4/2/06

4/2/06 - 4/9/06

4/9/06 - 4/16/06

4/16/06 - 4/23/06

4/23/06 - 4/30/06

4/30/06 - 5/7/06

5/7/06 - 5/14/06

5/14/06 - 5/21/06

5/21/06 - 5/28/06

5/28/06 - 6/4/06

6/4/06 - 6/11/06

6/11/06 - 6/18/06

6/18/06 - 6/25/06

6/25/06 - 7/2/06

7/2/06 - 7/9/06

7/9/06 - 7/16/06

7/16/06 - 7/23/06

7/23/06 - 7/30/06

7/30/06 - 8/6/06

8/6/06 - 8/13/06

8/13/06 - 8/20/06

8/20/06 - 8/27/06

8/27/06 - 9/3/06

9/3/06 - 9/10/06

9/10/06 - 9/17/06

9/17/06 - 9/24/06

9/24/06 - 10/1/06

10/1/06 - 10/8/06

10/8/06 - 10/15/06

10/15/06 - 10/22/06

10/22/06 - 10/29/06

10/29/06 - 11/5/06

11/5/06 - 11/12/06

11/12/06 - 11/19/06

11/19/06 - 11/26/06

11/26/06 - 12/3/06

12/3/06 - 12/10/06

12/10/06 - 12/17/06

12/17/06 - 12/24/06

12/24/06 - 12/31/06

12/31/06 - 1/7/07

1/7/07 - 1/14/07

1/14/07 - 1/21/07

1/21/07 - 1/28/07

1/28/07 - 2/4/07

2/4/07 - 2/11/07

2/11/07 - 2/18/07

2/18/07 - 2/25/07

2/25/07 - 3/4/07

3/4/07 - 3/11/07

3/11/07 - 3/18/07

3/18/07 - 3/25/07

3/25/07 - 4/1/07

4/1/07 - 4/8/07

4/8/07 - 4/15/07

4/15/07 - 4/22/07

4/22/07 - 4/29/07

4/29/07 - 5/6/07

5/6/07 - 5/13/07

5/13/07 - 5/20/07

5/20/07 - 5/27/07

5/27/07 - 6/3/07

6/3/07 - 6/10/07

6/10/07 - 6/17/07

6/17/07 - 6/24/07

6/24/07 - 7/1/07

7/1/07 - 7/8/07

7/8/07 - 7/15/07

7/15/07 - 7/22/07

7/22/07 - 7/29/07

7/29/07 - 8/5/07

8/5/07 - 8/12/07

8/12/07 - 8/19/07

8/19/07 - 8/26/07

8/26/07 - 9/2/07

9/2/07 - 9/9/07

9/9/07 - 9/16/07

9/16/07 - 9/23/07

9/23/07 - 9/30/07

9/30/07 - 10/7/07

10/7/07 - 10/14/07

10/14/07 - 10/21/07

10/21/07 - 10/28/07

10/28/07 - 11/4/07

11/4/07 - 11/11/07

11/11/07 - 11/18/07

11/18/07 - 11/25/07

11/25/07 - 12/2/07

12/2/07 - 12/9/07

12/9/07 - 12/16/07

12/16/07 - 12/23/07

12/23/07 - 12/30/07

12/30/07 - 1/6/08

1/6/08 - 1/13/08

1/13/08 - 1/20/08

1/20/08 - 1/27/08

1/27/08 - 2/3/08

2/3/08 - 2/10/08

2/10/08 - 2/17/08

2/17/08 - 2/24/08

2/24/08 - 3/2/08

3/2/08 - 3/9/08

3/9/08 - 3/16/08

3/16/08 - 3/23/08

3/23/08 - 3/30/08

3/30/08 - 4/6/08

4/6/08 - 4/13/08

4/13/08 - 4/20/08

4/20/08 - 4/27/08

4/27/08 - 5/4/08

5/4/08 - 5/11/08

5/11/08 - 5/18/08

5/18/08 - 5/25/08

5/25/08 - 6/1/08

6/1/08 - 6/8/08

6/8/08 - 6/15/08

6/15/08 - 6/22/08

6/22/08 - 6/29/08

6/29/08 - 7/6/08

7/6/08 - 7/13/08

7/13/08 - 7/20/08

7/20/08 - 7/27/08

7/27/08 - 8/3/08

8/3/08 - 8/10/08

8/10/08 - 8/17/08

8/17/08 - 8/24/08

8/24/08 - 8/31/08

8/31/08 - 9/7/08

9/7/08 - 9/14/08

9/14/08 - 9/21/08

9/21/08 - 9/28/08

9/28/08 - 10/5/08

10/5/08 - 10/12/08

10/12/08 - 10/19/08

10/19/08 - 10/26/08

10/26/08 - 11/2/08

11/2/08 - 11/9/08

11/9/08 - 11/16/08

11/16/08 - 11/23/08

11/23/08 - 11/30/08

11/30/08 - 12/7/08

12/7/08 - 12/14/08

12/14/08 - 12/21/08

12/21/08 - 12/28/08

12/28/08 - 1/4/09

1/4/09 - 1/11/09

1/11/09 - 1/18/09

1/18/09 - 1/25/09

1/25/09 - 2/1/09

2/1/09 - 2/8/09

2/8/09 - 2/15/09

2/15/09 - 2/22/09

2/22/09 - 3/1/09

3/1/09 - 3/8/09

3/8/09 - 3/15/09

3/15/09 - 3/22/09

3/22/09 - 3/29/09

3/29/09 - 4/5/09

4/5/09 - 4/12/09

4/12/09 - 4/19/09

4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17

10/1/17 - 10/8/17

10/8/17 - 10/15/17

10/15/17 - 10/22/17

10/22/17 - 10/29/17

10/29/17 - 11/5/17

11/5/17 - 11/12/17

11/12/17 - 11/19/17

11/19/17 - 11/26/17

11/26/17 - 12/3/17

12/3/17 - 12/10/17

12/10/17 - 12/17/17

12/17/17 - 12/24/17

12/24/17 - 12/31/17

12/31/17 - 1/7/18

1/7/18 - 1/14/18

1/14/18 - 1/21/18

1/21/18 - 1/28/18

1/28/18 - 2/4/18

2/4/18 - 2/11/18

2/11/18 - 2/18/18

2/18/18 - 2/25/18

2/25/18 - 3/4/18

3/4/18 - 3/11/18

3/11/18 - 3/18/18

3/18/18 - 3/25/18

3/25/18 - 4/1/18

4/1/18 - 4/8/18

4/8/18 - 4/15/18

4/15/18 - 4/22/18

4/22/18 - 4/29/18

4/29/18 - 5/6/18

5/6/18 - 5/13/18

5/13/18 - 5/20/18

5/20/18 - 5/27/18

5/27/18 - 6/3/18

6/3/18 - 6/10/18

6/10/18 - 6/17/18

6/17/18 - 6/24/18

6/24/18 - 7/1/18

7/1/18 - 7/8/18

7/8/18 - 7/15/18

7/15/18 - 7/22/18

7/22/18 - 7/29/18

7/29/18 - 8/5/18

8/5/18 - 8/12/18

8/12/18 - 8/19/18

8/19/18 - 8/26/18

8/26/18 - 9/2/18

9/2/18 - 9/9/18

9/9/18 - 9/16/18

9/16/18 - 9/23/18

9/23/18 - 9/30/18

9/30/18 - 10/7/18

10/7/18 - 10/14/18

10/14/18 - 10/21/18

10/21/18 - 10/28/18

10/28/18 - 11/4/18

11/4/18 - 11/11/18

11/11/18 - 11/18/18

11/18/18 - 11/25/18

11/25/18 - 12/2/18

12/2/18 - 12/9/18

12/9/18 - 12/16/18

12/16/18 - 12/23/18

12/23/18 - 12/30/18

12/30/18 - 1/6/19

1/6/19 - 1/13/19

1/13/19 - 1/20/19

1/20/19 - 1/27/19

1/27/19 - 2/3/19

2/3/19 - 2/10/19

2/10/19 - 2/17/19

2/17/19 - 2/24/19

3/3/19 - 3/10/19

3/10/19 - 3/17/19

3/17/19 - 3/24/19

3/24/19 - 3/31/19

3/31/19 - 4/7/19

4/7/19 - 4/14/19

4/14/19 - 4/21/19

4/21/19 - 4/28/19

4/28/19 - 5/5/19

5/5/19 - 5/12/19

5/12/19 - 5/19/19

5/19/19 - 5/26/19

5/26/19 - 6/2/19

6/2/19 - 6/9/19

6/9/19 - 6/16/19

6/16/19 - 6/23/19

6/23/19 - 6/30/19

6/30/19 - 7/7/19

7/7/19 - 7/14/19

7/14/19 - 7/21/19

7/21/19 - 7/28/19

7/28/19 - 8/4/19

8/4/19 - 8/11/19

8/11/19 - 8/18/19

8/18/19 - 8/25/19

8/25/19 - 9/1/19

9/1/19 - 9/8/19

9/8/19 - 9/15/19

9/15/19 - 9/22/19

9/22/19 - 9/29/19

9/29/19 - 10/6/19

10/6/19 - 10/13/19

10/13/19 - 10/20/19

10/20/19 - 10/27/19

10/27/19 - 11/3/19

11/3/19 - 11/10/19

11/10/19 - 11/17/19

11/17/19 - 11/24/19

11/24/19 - 12/1/19

12/1/19 - 12/8/19

12/8/19 - 12/15/19

12/15/19 - 12/22/19

12/22/19 - 12/29/19

12/29/19 - 1/5/20

1/5/20 - 1/12/20

1/12/20 - 1/19/20

1/19/20 - 1/26/20

1/26/20 - 2/2/20

2/2/20 - 2/9/20

2/9/20 - 2/16/20

2/16/20 - 2/23/20

2/23/20 - 3/1/20

3/1/20 - 3/8/20

3/8/20 - 3/15/20

3/15/20 - 3/22/20

3/22/20 - 3/29/20

3/29/20 - 4/5/20

4/5/20 - 4/12/20

4/12/20 - 4/19/20

4/19/20 - 4/26/20

4/26/20 - 5/3/20

5/3/20 - 5/10/20

5/10/20 - 5/17/20

5/17/20 - 5/24/20

5/24/20 - 5/31/20

5/31/20 - 6/7/20

6/7/20 - 6/14/20

6/14/20 - 6/21/20

6/28/20 - 7/5/20