A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

My Inexorable Retreat From Technology
Saturday, January 21, 2017






The advance of technology is inexorable and few folks ever seem to understand or even be aware on how it affects one’s actions and one’s thoughts.

The advent of the digital camera in which, after taking a raw image, one can convert it into many ways, from high contrast to b+w or to some crazy colour has at the same time taken away from the photographer a flexibility of approach, as an example, to a portrait.

I prefer to use more than one camera. I might use a digital camera, a large medium format and a 35mm Nikon FM-2 both with film. I might and I have opted for two 35mm cameras, one loaded with b+w film and the other with colour. And while my stock of Fuji Instant film lasts I can shoot that with my Mamiya RB-67.

My friends think this is inefficient. I argue that the one digital image with all its possible variations is still one and the same picture. When I transfer from one camera to another, my portrait subject might move and reconsider a pose. The changing of cameras also affects how I approach my next shot. The result is a large variety of portraits.

Having a smart phone suddenly be made obsolete by a new version or model makes most people trade in (better word is discard).

I have been faced with this new technology conundrum with our brand new 2017 Chevrolet Cruze. Once we had purchased the car I was shocked to find out that it had no CD player.

My friends have told me that I must modernize and accept the changing technology. I have been instructed to “rip” my CDs and then convert the files to MP3 and save them on to a flash drive.
Much has been written on how MP3 files compress sound by taking stuff. Much has been written about the warmer sound of LP records.

Of the former statement I do not think my ears could possibly tell the difference between an MP3 file played through a good sound system and a CD through the same. Of the latter I believe since I am old enough to have seen my first long play record in 1955, that many records had noise and scratches from day one. I remember the spending of money to get a better cartridge, a better turntable, a better record cleaning device, etc.

I believe that most who praise the sound of modern LPS are younger people who believe what they read.

I am very happy with the sound of my many CDs in my home sound system with a Denon CD player, NAD amplifier and the JBL Studio Monitors. If I have to play a record for which I have no corresponding CD I use my Sony linear tracking turntable with a Stanton cartridge.

Today I went to my local London Drugs and enquired, “How can I play CDs in my new car that does not have a CD changer?”

A $40 portable Sylvania CD changer connected to my car’s headphone port (it took 1 minute after I put two double As into the changer) produced beautiful sound which I can modify for volume with two buttons behind my steering wheel. It sounds superb but I am sure I could not tell the difference from an MP3 file.

It feels good to be a throwback.

At Sikora’s (they sell CDs!) I was told (by a friendly and knowledgeable staff) of two, heretofore unknown to me, CDs from the Dave Brubeck Quartet project that began with Time Out.  I had the third one, Time Out in Outer Space (and dedicated to John Glenn) as an LP that was beginning to show its age. I now have the whole collection and lots of it is listening to something for the first time even though it might be 50 years old.



Me gotta go - Locura & Tormenti
Friday, January 20, 2017

Raquel Andueza
Louie Louie, oh no
Me gotta go
Aye-yi-yi-yi, I said
Louie Louie, oh baby
Me gotta go

Richard Berry



I may have been premature here about not caring if I died after listening to Raquel Andueza and La Galanía (Pierre Pitzl – baroque guitar, Jesús Fernández Baena theorbo) sing Jean Baptiste Lully’s Sé que me muero.

After perusing the program for today’s EMV concert at Christ Church Cathedral I spotted five works that immediately put on hold my suicidal inclinations.

These are Henry du Bailly’s (¿ -1637) Yo soy la locura, Tarquinio Merula’s (1595-1665) Folle è ben che si crede, Claudio Monteverdi’s (1567-1643) Si dolce è’l tormento , Folias by G. Sanz/improvisation (ca. 1640-1710) and Canarios by Gaspar Sanz.

The concert is titled Locura & Tormenti (Madness & Torments). I have no idea if anybody else in Vancouver shares my love and obsession for follias. I have written about them here and here.

The English word folly comes from the French word folie. But it is my RAE (the on-line Dictionary of the Real Academia Española) that reveals far more:

folía
Del fr. folie 'locura'.
1. f. Canto y baile popular de las islas Canarias.
2. f. Música ligera, generalmente de gusto popular.
3. f. desus.  locura
4. f. pl. Baile portugués de gran ruido, que se bailaba entre muchas personas.
5. f. pl. Tañido y mudanza de un baile español, que solía bailar alguien solo con castañuelas.

Real Academia Española © Todos los derechos reservados

The above mentions that folía is also about locura or madness. I wonder if in the repeated occurrences of the plague in Europe, people danced amongst those who were dead or dying. And that first citation that mentions that a folía is or was a popular song and dance in the Canary Islands might just hint of the content of that Gaspar Sanz work Canarios.

The most famous follia is Arcangelo Corelli’s Violin Sonata in D minor, Op.5 No.12 'La Folia'. I have a beautiful version with Monica Huggett on violin. But the fact is that a folia, follia or in whatever other spelling you might choose always has an underlying melody that repeats, enthrals and ultimately stays in your head. I can state here unequivocally that these 17 and 18th century follias are simply baroque proto-Louie Louies! Some years ago Ballet BC danced to a Corelli variant of his La Folia by Francesco Geminiani.

My idea of the best way of spending a day at a concert hall would be a day’s worth of all the follias that can be found. But that would not end there as I have another obsession and, please note, that in today’s program there is Caprice de Chacone by one Francesco Corbetta (1615-1681).

A Chaconne (different spellings depending on the language) is defined thusly by my Wikipedia:

A chaconne (/ʃəˈkɒn/; French: [ʃakɔn]; Spanish: chacona; Italian: ciaccona, pronounced [tʃakˈkoːna]; earlier English: chacony is a type of musical composition popular in the baroque era when it was much used as a vehicle for variation on a repeated short harmonic progression, often involving a fairly short repetitive bass-line (ground bass) which offered a compositional outline for variation, decoration, figuration and melodic invention. In this it closely resembles the passacaglia.

The ground bass, if there is one, may typically descend stepwise from the tonic to the dominant pitch of the scale; the harmonies given to the upper parts may emphasize the circle of fifths or a derivative pattern thereof.


I absolutely love chaconnes as does my 14-year old granddaughter who plays the violin. When we hear one we smile. Could the ubiquitous chaconne be another Louie-Louie?

My friend Ray Nurse, a fine baritone, who plays the lute and makes them answered me when I asked him if Paul Desmond’s Take Five was a chaconne. His answer was a short, “Yes.”

And so Raquel Andueza and La Galanía  are presenting us tonight with a program that is all madness and (obsessive) torment. I could not ask for more.

In the last few days I have been thinking on how language affects how we think. Spanish like French have gender specific nouns. So el sexo is masculine. Any Argentine man knows that a car is la máquina so cars are women. In the opening line and title to the first song of the evening, Bailly's Yo soy la locura, madness is a woman who lures men into perdition.

But I must leave the last word to Andueza who wrote me (gently to correct typos and the misspeling of her surname) and mentioned tht the gender of the very long and large theorbo that Jesús Fernández Baena plays is la tiorba. Tht goes hand in hand with la guitarra. I just wonder what happened to el laúd, the Spanish lute.



The Turtle Shell Fan & La Galanía in Vancouver
Thursday, January 19, 2017


Pierre Pitzl, Raquel Andueza & Jesús Fernández Baena

The EMV concert with La Galanía, soprano Raquel Andueza, the barroque guitarist Pierre Pitzl and Jesús Fernández Baena on a the theorbo this past Friday, January 20 at Christ Church Cathedral was a revelation. At the same time it became a delicious romp of my past with memoris of places where Spanish (castellano in Argentina and español in Mexico) is spoken.

My maternal grandfather, a lawyer in Manila, was a member of the Real Academia Española. My grandmother always would tell me that I had to learn to speak and write Don Tirso's and Cervantes' language well. After having lived in Vancouver in 1975 I sometimes have a trouble keeping up with Spanish. But as we say in Spanish,"Me defiendo."

It was a special concert not only because one half of the program was in Spanish
Don Tirso de Irureta Goyena
but also because I could feel that mischievous take (diablesa or vivesa) in the words of the songs. My grandmother would have said that Anduezea sang with "sal" or salt. 
The sound of the theorbo, especially in its lower registry is one of the most arresting sounds of any musical instrument. Perhaps a bass trombone might compete but certainly not (my humble opinion) a cello.
The usual problem with listening to the wonders of the theorbo (and I must add that baroque guitar) is that these instruments are usually drowned out by the violins of a baroque orchestra.  So this trio delighted me with an intimate sound that made me feel like I was Charles the Fifth in my chambers..

There might have been a few folks who could not understand why so much of the repertoire on Friday had similar melodies. It would seem that La Galanía coincide with this blogger's love for follias and chaconnes of the 17th century. The concert was an eternity of chaconnes and follias , the equivalent, for me, of sitting to the right of the Lord!
 
Best of all was to share the shear pleasure that the trio threw at us with gentle smiles.They were having fun. I had that same pleasure in my personal dealings with them in the sachristy bathroom after the concert.. 

In that bathroom where I took my two shots you will see a lovely fan in one of the photographs. It was my great aunt's, Buenaverntura Gálvez Puig. When she died my grandmother inherited it. It was made of turtle shell and a Filipino cloth calle jusi made from Chinese silk. My great aunt's initials were with dimaonds and emeralds.

María de los Doloree Reyes de Irureta Goyena (my grandmother) y Buenaventura Gálvez Puig
My mother inherited the fan but she was confronted by her sister who also wanted it. In the end my aunt kept the jewels and my mother the fan. My mother had a lovely relation with her aunt Buenaventura who would comb my mother's long hair. She would wince in pain. Buenaventura would tell her that in order to be a woman she had to learn to experience pain. In the end my aunt used the fan's jewels to finance her second divorce. In the scan of the fan on the upper right you might discern the little holes where the stones were.

Buenaventura Gálvez Puig was a concert pianist in turn-of -the-20th-Century Manila. That a soprano and two talented musicians would have posed with her fan in a bathroom would have delighted her Latin mind.




Sé Que Me Muero de Amor - I Know I Am Dying of Love
Wednesday, January 18, 2017



Raquel Andueza - Photograph Michal Novak


Locura & Tormenti  Presented by Early Music Vancouver - Raquel Andueza - Soprano and Spanish Baroque Ensemble La Galanía

Spanish and Italian Music from Around the Time of Cervantes

Friday January 20, 2017 | 7:30pm (Pre-concert talk 6:45pm)
Christ Church Cathedral


Aunque no exceda la categoría de anécdota en la historia de la música, resulta interesante recordar esta pequeña pieza que el dramaturgo Jean Baptiste Poquelin, a quien el teatro universal recuerda con el sobrenombre de Molière, compuso dentro de la obra El burgués gentilhombre (Le Bourgeois gentilhomme) cuya música está firmada por otro Jean-Baptiste (¿o deberíamos decir Giovanni Battista dado su origen italiano?), de apellido Lully, uno de los máximos exponentes de la música barroca y una de las cumbres de la composición francesa de todos los tiempos.



Se trata de la canción Sé que muero de amor y su particularidad reside en que está escrita en perfecto español dentro de un libreto en francés. Pero además de lo curioso de la inserción del idioma castellano, que está justificado en el libreto porque es una melodía interpretada por varios españoles, resulta notable la belleza de la pieza en sí misma, erradicada del contexto de la obra.



Se trata de un texto y de una música que conmueven por la belleza de la combinación de los acordes con las palabras, como nos recordó Raquel Andueza rescatando el tema en su disco de 2011 con La Galanía Yo soy la locura.



The above text in Spanish is from this site. It is about a curious fact that within Molière’s work Le Bourgeois  gentilhomme, whose music is signed by an Italian Giovani Battista Lulli  but better known as the Frenchman Jean-Baptiste Lully there is a work written in perfect Spanish within a French libretto. The piece is called Sé Que Me Muero de Amor or I Know that I Am Dying of Love.

This lovely song will be performed by the Basque soprano (o my!) Raquel Andueza and the Spanish Baroque ensemble La Galanía this Friday at the Early Music Vancouver concert at Christ Church Cathedral. With her will be Pierre Pitzl on the baroque guitar and Jesús Fernández Baena on the theorbo. The theorbo is a very large (as in long) ancestor of the guitar and the baroque guitar is much smaller than a modern guitar. These two instruments will be just right to show off Andueza's voice while the theorbo without the competition of a large orchestra will demonstrate how beautiful this instrument is, particularly with its extened bass notes. The theorbo strange as it might seem is tiorba in Spanish. This means that there will be two women on stage. Make that three as it is la guitarra.


Íñigo Balboa y Aguirre & Angélica de Alquézar
It is the fifth work to be performed (16 in all). I am sure that the whole program will be exquisite and more so for me as many of the songs are in Spanish.

But I can clearly state here that if I have a heart attack after Sé Que Me Muero de Amor, I will die happy. I am not beautiful nor do I have red hair in common with Ms. Azueta but both of us have a Basque origin. ¡You see I am Jorge Alejandro Waterhouse-Hayward de Irureta Goyena!

Listen to Raquel Andueza sing  Sé Que Me Muero de Amor (and you can die!)

La Galanía with Raquel Andueza



Rodney Sharman on New Music for Old Instruments
Tuesday, January 17, 2017


Rodney Sharman
Guest Blog by Vancouver composer Rodney Sharman


Discovering the New:
My experience of early music and new music is similar; both hold plenty of lesser known composers, real discoveries.


Background:
Reggie Mobley and Alex Weimann’s Early Music Vancouver recital co-produced with the Queer Arts Festival was one of the best concerts I have ever attended, such insightful and exciting performances of unusual repertoire, including marvellous music by 17th Century (prolific) composer, Isabella Leonarda, original, banned words to Noel Coward’s “Mad About the Boy” researched and restored. Reggie Mobley is not only a wonderful singer, he’s of the most intelligent, astute, and politically savvy performers I know. Alex Weimann played almost at least half of the concert from short score, either as figured bass or lead sheets, in other words, his sensitive and imaginative keyboard playing was improvised on both harpsichord and piano.

Invitation/Inspiration:
There is so much wonderful music written for old instruments in the last hundred years. Many of the artists responsible for the early music revival were commissioners of new work. I know many great pieces for early instruments, and these concerts feature several of them. I was delighted to have been asked by Matthew White to assemble these concerts with co-curator Alex Weimann.

We started by programming Peter Hannan’s “Trinkets of Little Value”, a favourite piece of Bramwell Tovey, and “Golden”, a PBO commission and audience favourite by Jocelyn Morlock. Jocelyn suggested a marvellous local soprano, Camille Hesketh, recently returned to the Vancouver area after an active career in the Netherlands. I have wanted Reggie Mobley to sing my music ever since I heard him in recital. Jocelyn Morlock is a great admirer of Reggie’s artistry, too, and we both adapted music for him for the PBO concert. (Neither of us has ever rewritten music specifically for a singer before.) 

Alexander Weimann & Reginald Mobley

New Music for Old Instruments:
Here is a wonderful description of the relationship between early music and new music by Alex Weimann:

It feels like something very natural to me, almost like something along our usual lines. The so called Early Music repertoire holds plenty of lesser known composers, real discoveries, lots of “new” pieces, and according to the beautiful sentence “the past is a foreign country”, we are experienced with performing music without the precedent of having heard them before; we often are approaching the unfamiliar territory, and jumping into adventurous waters, having to unearth what the composer might have had in mind, and trying to comprehend and learn another musical language. Playing a contemporary piece has the advantage that we are able to ask the composer if we don’t understand some of what is written down, a luxury we can’t enjoy in Early Music.

Short of holding a séance, there is no way of communicating with an early music composer except through scores and secondary sources. At these concerts, composers Linda Catlin Smith, André Ristic, Christopher Reiche, Jocelyn Morlock, Peter Hannan, Patrick Giguére and myself will be in attendance.

Jocelyn Morlock


Serious Fun:
The orchestra concert Jan 28 ends with three popular songs and improvisations on old standards.The impetus came from Alex Weimann’s transcendental arrangement of “Bein’ Green” for countertenor Matthew White (our “boss”) and Baroque string orchestra. Alex’s string writing is filled with rich inner parts and ornamentation, and has a feeling of suspended time like Gregorian chant. I knew of Reggie Mobley’s dream of singing old standards with Baroque orchestra, and asked him for his favourites, from which Alex and I chose two songs. My choice was immediate, and more than a little hedonistic, Cole Porter’s “Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye”.


Bramwell Tovey

I thought this a beautiful way to end the formal concert, and a nice segue to improvisations by Alex, Reggie, and VSO Music Director Bramwell Tovey that will conclude the evening. Bramwell is a wonderful jazz pianist. Reggie and Alex will perform old standards including jazz improvisation. Expect the artistic bar to be high, and the venue’s bar to be open.




     

Previous Posts
Abraham Darby - Three Men & an Over the Top Rose

Doctor Pat McGeer - The Basketball Player

The State of Being Alone

Red

Grace & Elegance

I hoed and trenched and weeded

Performances That Have Melted Into Thin Air

Love Is Doing - Rosemary Does

Resistentialism & Free Will

La Belle Sultane



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8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17