A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Pathos - πάθος, ους, τό
Saturday, October 15, 2016



When Peggy first came into my studio for a photo session for the Georgia Straight she was a young and exciting ballerina. Best of all she was smart. I was impressed by her ambition. A few weeks after the session, she called me up to tell me that she had enjoyed the experience and wanted me to take more photographs. This I did. It was fun for me too as she was an excellent subject.

Then one day she called. Her tone of voice seemed to be light (she was actively making it seem so). She told me something like this, “I am still dancing but I am changing my profession.” I had my suspicions but I did not want to reveal it. She then suggested that I take some photographs that would reflect the change. It was then that she told me that she was abandoning her ballet and becoming an exotic dancer. Knowing this I suggested that she bring all the clothes related to both professions and that we would do a sequence.

The first session with Peggy for Georgia Straight cover

At the time I was most interested in photographic sequences. I called them narratives and they consisted of five (sometimes three) smallish photograph inserted in one long mat and then framed.
Some of my sequences featured my eldest granddaughter (as a very young dancer) posing individually and alternating with her ballet teacher. Another was of a Japanese woman coming into my studio dressed in a kimono and then shedding it little by little. One sequence I have often shot is of a woman in which only in the last and fifth picture do you find out she is 9 months pregnant.

The session with Peggy had an unpredictable conclusion. She shed her ballet outfit completely which included her ballet shoes. Then she began to put on very red and very high heeled shoes. It was then that she began to cry. In fact she began to cry (as I look at this photograph) when she posed for me naked but with the protection of her slipper by her face. 

But there was a happy ending to this. Peggy became (until she quit and is now a jewelry designer) tje best pole dancer I have ever seen. And she has recently communicated that she is returning to BC from Alberta in the spring. It would seem that we are going to renew our photographic relationship.



You Want Me Pale - Alfonsina Storni
Friday, October 14, 2016



 Frente al Mar - Alfonsina Storni
Alfonsina Storni


Tú Me Quieres Blanca - Alfonsina Storni (the poem in English below)

Tú me quieres alba,
Me quieres de espumas,
Me quieres de nácar.
Que sea azucena
Sobre todas, casta.

De perfume tenue.
Corola cerrada
Ni un rayo de luna
Filtrado me haya.
Ni una margarita
Se diga mi hermana.

Tú me quieres nívea,
Tú me quieres blanca,
Tú me quieres alba.
Tú que hubiste todas
Las copas a mano,
De frutos y mieles
Los labios morados.
Tú que en el banquete
Cubierto de pámpanos
Dejaste las carnes
Festejando a Baco.
Tú que en los jardines
Negros del Engaño
Vestido de rojo
Corriste al Estrago.

Tú que el esqueleto
Conservas intacto
No sé todavía
Por cuáles milagros,
Me pretendes blanca
(Dios te lo perdone),
Me pretendes casta
(Dios te lo perdone),
¡Me pretendes alba!

Huye hacia los bosques,
Vete a la montaña;
Límpiate la boca;
Vive en las cabañas;
Toca con las manos
La tierra mojada;
Alimenta el cuerpo
Con raíz amarga;
Bebe de las rocas;
Duerme sobre escarcha;
Renueva tejidos
Con salitre y agua;
Habla con los pájaros
Y lévate al alba.
Y cuando las carnes
Te sean tornadas,
Y cuando hayas puesto
En ellas el alma
Que por las alcobas
Se quedó enredada,
Entonces, buen hombre,
Preténdeme blanca,
Preténdeme nívea,
Preténdeme casta.

 

 

You Want Me Pale


You want me pale,
Made of sea foam,
A mother of pearl.
Made of white lily,
Untouched among the others.
Made of thinning perfume.
Petals sealed.

Not touched by moonbeams,
Not called 'sister' by the daisies.
You want me like snow,
You want me white,
You want me pale.

You have had all
The cups in your hands,
Flowing fruit and honey,
Staining your lips dark.
You have been in the banquet
Laced with grapevines,
Relinquishing your meat,
Reveling in Bacchus.
You have been in the gardens,
Black with deception,
Wearing red and
Running into ruin.

You have kept your
Skeleton intact, and by
Miracles I do not know,
Still expect me to be white
(God forgive you for it),
Still expect me to be spotless
(God forgive you for it),
Still expect me to be pale.

So flee into the woods,
Run into the mountains;
Clean your mouth;
Live in a cottage;
Touch the damp earth
With your hands;
Nourish your body with
The bitter root;
Drink, like Moses,
From the rocks;
Sleep upon the frost;
Rejuvenate your flesh
With saltpetre and water;
Speak with the birds,
Rise with the sun.
And when your body
Has returned to you,
When it's become entangled
In the bedroom of your soul,
Only then, good man,
Can you expect me to be pale,
Expect me to be snow,
Expect me to be untouched.

Translated from the Spanish by Sarah Fletcher



Mirada de Soslayo - Cortísimo Metraje - Julio Cortázar
Thursday, October 13, 2016


Of late I have laid to rest my Jorge Luís Borges and Emily Dickinson books to read Argentine novelist Julio Cortázar who wrote really short stories, some of them single paragraphs. I found this story because I was thinking of the Spanish expression “mirar de reojo” (in Cortázar story) which sort of translates to “look from the corner of your eye.” It does not sound as poetic nor can it compare to that other lovely expression “mirar de soslayo.” Many of his stories are erotic and most contain a surprise (askew?) ending.

The reason is that my long-time friend Tarren has that askew eye look on her face. Those eyes come with the finest body I have ever photographed in my many years of doing that delightful task.

In the late 50s when I was around 16 I while boarding at St. Edward’s High School in Austin I used to go to some bookstores on what then was a very seedy 6th Street. The cheap barber college was there. But you had to be careful as my classmates warned me, “If you are not careful some spick is going to roll you.” In those pocket bookstores (before the era of easy availability of pornography) I looked for books that had sexy passages. My mother read Frank G. Slaughter’s medical novels. These had many steamy passages. One constant in some of those books was the use of the word loins. It was not used in the biblical term of “girding up your loins for battle.” I believe that word has lost its coinage in this 21st century.

But I must again bring back my friend Tarren into the picture. Of all the beautiful women I ever photographed she was the only one who ever, I can honestly afirm, stirred my loins! There, I have said it. I have photographed her for years and there is that “mirada de soslayo” or could it be a sleepy eye. Whatever it is it is deadly.

I have told this story a few times on exactly how deadly she almost became. Flying in a de Havilland Beaver on a weekend from shooting a CBC serial show in Egmont the pilot was approaching the Vancouver dock when he suddenly made an abrupt movement and I thought we were going to crash into the water. He pulled up and landed. As I deplaned there was a beautiful woman with the shortest red silk hotpants I had ever seen. She was wearing red pumps. She said to me, “How are you doing Alex?” The pilot looked at me incredulously and said, “You know her? She is why we almost crashed!”

And so for your delight here are a couple of shots of Tarren and those wonderful eyes of her.




CORTÍSIMO METRAJE

(cuento)

Julio Cortázar (Bélgica-Argentina, 1914-1984)

Automovilista en vacaciones recorre las montañas del centro de Francia, se aburre lejos de la ciudad y de la vida nocturna. Muchacha le hace el gesto usual del auto-stop, tímidamente pregunta si dirección Beaune o Tournus. En la carretera unas palabras, hermoso perfil moreno que pocas veces pleno rostro, lacónicamente a las preguntas del que ahora, mirando los muslos desnudos contra el asiento rojo. Al término de un viraje el auto sale de la carretera y se pierde en lo más espeso. De reojo sintiendo cómo cruza las manos sobre la minifalda mientras el terror crece poco a poco. Bajo los árboles una profunda gruta vegetal donde se podrá, salta del auto, la otra portezuela y brutalmente por los hombros. La muchacha lo mira como si no, se deja bajar del auto sabiendo que en la soledad del bosque. Cuando la mano por la cintura para arrastrarla entre los árboles, pistola del bolso y a la sien. Después billetera, verifica bien llena, de paso roba el auto que abandonará algunos kilómetros más lejos sin dejar la menor impresión digital porque en ese oficio no hay que descuidarse’.

Último round (1969), Madrid, Debate, 1992
 





Tu más Profunda Piel - Julio Cortázar
Wednesday, October 12, 2016





Tu más  Profunda Piel – Julio Cortázar


Cada memoria enamorada guarda sus magdalenas y la mía -sábelo, allí donde estés- es el perfume del tabaco rubio que me devuelve a tu espigada noche, a la ráfaga de tu más profunda piel. No el tabaco que se aspira, el humo que tapiza las gargantas, sino esa vaga equívoca fragancia que deja la pipa, en los dedos y que en algún momento, en algún gesto inadvertido, asciende con su látigo de delicia para encabritar tu recuerdo, la sombra de tu espalda contra el blanco velamen de las sábanas.

No me mires desde la ausencia con esa gravedad un poco infantil que hacia de tu rostro una máscara de joven faraón nubio. Creo que siempre estuvo entendido que sólo nos daríamos el placer y las fiestas livianas del alcohol y las calles vacías de la medianoche. De ti tengo más que eso, pero en el recuerdo me vuelves desnuda y volcada, nuestro planeta más preciso fue esa cama donde lentas, imperiosas geografías iban naciendo de nuestros viajes, de tanto desembarco amable o resistido de embajadas con cestos de frutas o agazapados flecheros, y cada pozo, cada río, cada colina y cada llano los hallamos en noches extenuantes, entre oscuros parlamentos de aliados o enemigos. ¡Oh viajera de ti misma, máquina de olvido! Y entonces me paso la mano por la cara con un gesto distraído y el perfume del tabaco en mis dedos te trae otra vez para arrancarme a este presente acostumbrado, te proyecta antílope en la pantalla de ese lecho donde vivimos las interminables rutas de un efímero encuentro.


Yo aprendía contigo lenguajes paralelos: el de esa geometría de tu cuerpo que me llenaba la boca y las manos de teoremas temblorosos, el de tu hablar diferente, tu lengua insular que tantas veces me confundía. Con el perfume del tabaco vuelve ahora un recuerdo preciso que lo abarca todo en un instante que es como un vórtice, sé que dijiste " Me da pena, y yo no comprendí porque nada creía que pudiera apenarte en esa maraña de caricias que nos volvía ovillo blanco y negro, lenta danza en que el uno pesaba sobre el otro para luego dejarse invadir por la presión liviana de unos muslos, de unos brazos, rotando blandamente y desligándose hasta otra vez ovillarse y repetir las caída desde lo alto o lo hondo, jinete o potro arquero o gacela, hipogrifos afrontados, delfines en mitad del salto. Entonces aprendí que la pena en tu boca era otro nombre del pudor y la vergüenza, y que no te decidías a mi nueva sed que ya tanto habías saciado, que me rechazabas suplicando con esa manera de esconder los ojos, de apoyar el mentón en la garganta para no dejarme en la boca más que el negro nido de tu pelo.

Dijiste "Me da pena, sabes", y volcada de espaldas me miraste con ojos y senos, con labios que trazaban una flor de lentos pétalos. Tuve que doblarte los brazos, murmurar un último deseo con el correr de las manos por las más dulces colinas, sintiendo como poco a poco cedías y te echabas de lado hasta rendir el sedoso muro de tu espalda donde un menudo omóplato tenía algo de ala de ángel mancillado. Te daba pena, y de esa pena iba a nacer el perfume que ahora me devuelve a tu vergüenza antes de que otro acorde, el último, nos alzara en una misma estremecida réplica. Sé que cerré los ojos, que lamí la sal de tu piel, que descendí volcándote hasta sentir tus riñones como el estrechamiento de la jarra donde se apoyan las manos con el ritmo de la ofrenda; en algún momento llegué a perderme en el pasaje hurtado y prieto que se llegaba al goce de mis labios mientras desde tan allá, desde tu país de arriba y lejos, murmuraba tu pena una última defensa abandonada.

Con el perfume del tabaco rubio en los dedos asciende otra vez el balbuceo, el temblor de ese oscuro encuentro, sé que una boca buscó la oculta boca estremecida, el labio único ciñéndose a su miedo, el ardiente contorno rosa y bronce que te libraba a mi más extremo viaje. Y como ocurre siempre, no sentí en ese delirio lo que ahora me trae el recuerdo desde un vago aroma de tabaco, pero esa musgosa fragancia, esa canela de sombra hizo su camino secreto a partir del olvido necesario e instantáneo, indecible juego de la carne oculta a la conciencia lo que mueve las más densas, implacables máquinas del fuego. No eras sabor ni olor, tu más escondido país se daba como imagen y contacto, y sólo hoy unos dedos casualmente manchados de tabaco me devuelven el instante en que me enderecé sobre ti para lentamente reclamar las llaves de pasaje, forzar el dulce trecho donde tu pena tejía las últimas defensas ahora que con la boca hundida en la almohada sollozabas una súplica de oscura aquiescencia, de derramado pelo. Más tarde comprendiste y no hubo pena, me cediste la ciudad de tu más profunda piel desde tanto horizonte diferente, después de fabulosas máquinas de sitio y parlamentos y batallas. En esta vaga vainilla de tabaco que hoy me mancha los dedos se despierta la noche en que tuviste tu primera, tu última pena. Cierro los ojos y aspiro en el pasado ese perfume de tu carne más secreta, quisiera no abrirlos a este ahora donde leo y fumo y todavía creo estar viviendo.



Christopher Dafoe - That Civil Man
Tuesday, October 11, 2016


Christopher Dafoe


On Friday morning, that morning when Trump’s recording on a bus first emerged  onto the media I noticed that words like bi--- (female dog), pu—sy ( not vagina as reported but accurately vulva) and other words were bleeped. By the afternoon they were not.

My friend Paul Leisz sent me this link to a Bill Maher video

At age 74 I am still shocked when someone on TV (even if it is supposed to be funny) uses that four-letter word. My hero MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow only goes as far as saying “frigging”.
Since I am from the generation that grew up with WalterCronkite I abhor what the 21st century has done to transform and demean journalism. Perhaps it has to do with journalism now really being journalism/entertainment.

Could we say it began in the United States with Lenny Bruce and then taken over by George Carlin? A Houston friend took me to a performance by Carlin in the mid 80s. I was not impressed.

All this reminds me of a man with whom I worked for some years when he was the arts correspondent for the Globe& Mail. He is my friend Christopher Dafoe who  knew in what direction journalism was headed so he quit the business and became a highfalutin lawyer for a Vancouver law firm.

In the years that I worked with him when I would set up my photo equipment and lights while he interviewed celebrities of all kinds (he kindly permitted me to be present so that I could get an idea on my subject’s movements and gestures) I noticed that he hardly ever spoke and the persons he faced seemed to be comfortable and told all. He was never nasty nor pushy. His demeanour was a sort of “aw shucks I am just a lowly journalist in a one-horse town”.

Dafoe was the sort of man that would invite novelist Elmore Leonard for a hamburger and interview him over fries.

Now as a lawyer I call him every once in a while to check if something I might have written in a blog can pass the libel test. Or I call him for his take on some arts scene situation in our city. He is invariably kind in his remarks. In person when I run into him at the theatre he is the very man I remember him to be.

What ever happened to civility?



Debbie Blair a Sweet Soul I Met Many Times
Monday, October 10, 2016


Debbie Blair - Photographer unknown

Just 10 years ago at EDAM Dance performances at the Western Front I would take my older granddaughter Rebecca then 9 or so. A few years later we were accompanied by her younger sister Lauren.

Always there to greet us with her pleasant smile and low key voice was Debbie Blair who worked, my guess, as a volunteer for Peter Bingham’s troupe of contact improvisational dancers.

Somehow  Debbie Blair and I crossed paths many times and in many places. The first time was in the late 80s when I was shooting a brochure for the then Emily College of Art & Design. I was going to take some photographs of a life drawing class and Blair came up to me concerned on exactly how I was going to photograph her and the young man on the platform on the centre of the studio. I told her not to worry as I was going to photograph them from the rear. And this I did.

In the beginning of the 90s I was dispatched by the Georgia Straight to shoot on the town of Sointula on Malcolom Island North of Vancouver Island for a piece by Taras Grescoe. It was later published by the Guardian with my photographs.

I do not remember the circumstances but when I got off the ferry at Sointula there was a smiling Debbie Blair. What we talked about is now hidden in my head by that faulty memory that comes with age.

I can only hope that this sweet soul be found soon and unharmed.




La Muchacha Rubia - Julio Cortázar
Sunday, October 09, 2016






Patio de tarde

Minicuento - Texto completo.
Julio Cortázar

A Toby le gusta ver pasar a la muchacha rubia por el patio. Levanta la cabeza y remueve un poco la cola, pero después se queda muy quieto, siguiendo con los ojos la fina sombra que a su vez va siguiendo a la muchacha rubia por las baldosas del patio. En la habitación hace fresco, y Toby detesta el sol de la siesta; ni siquiera le gusta que la gente ande levantada a esa hora, y la única excepción es la muchacha rubia. Para Toby la muchacha rubia puede hacer lo que se le antoje. Remueve otra vez la cola, satisfecho de haberla visto, y suspira. Es simplemente feliz, la muchacha rubia ha pasado por el patio, él la ha visto un instante, ha seguido con sus grandes ojos avellana la sombra en las baldosas. Tal vez la muchacha rubia vuelva a pasar. Toby suspira de nuevo, sacude un momento la cabeza como para espantar una mosca, mete el pincel en el tarro, y sigue aplicando la cola a la madera terciada.

FIN

















     

Previous Posts
Mumbai's Zona de Tolerancia

An Encounter with the Exotic at the York Theatre

Lauren & Casi-Casi Met Up

Edwin Varney - Unstampable

Edward Clendon River - Michael Turner & Modigliani...

The Progression of an Idea.

Boeing 747 The Queen of the Skies

In Search of My Relevance With The Goblin Market

Marv Newland's Scratchy - Itching Us On

Rain



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10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17

10/1/17 - 10/8/17

10/8/17 - 10/15/17

10/15/17 - 10/22/17