A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

A Poet, A Cynic, A Conqueror & A $10 Bet
Saturday, January 04, 2014




Margaret Visser - Hotel Vancouver  Sept 1994

The blog below appeared before on October 26, 2006. I am placing it again with more details. One reason is that for once in this bleak January, Rosemary thinks we should skip Mexican cultural cities and perhaps go to a Mexican beach and do nothing. Which had me thinking of Pindar the Poet or was that Diogenes the cynic? If you want to find out how that came about that a Mexican beach would make me instantly think of Alexander the Great in Corinth or was that Thebes? - read on. I lifted the 2006 blog from a backpage Vancouver Sun Rear Window which appeared for a few years on Thursdays. It was created by Queue Magazine editor Charles Campbell who thought that Rear Window could be a vehicle for me. I would write about a photograph from the past (in this case Sept 1994) with an event of the week October 5-12 2000 as Margaret Visser was in town to read from her book The Geometry of Love - Space, Time, Mystery and Meaning in an Ordinary Church.






A nice foil to a good mystery is a book of essays. In recent years, Henry Petroski has expounded on ferris wheels (Remaking the World - Adventures in Engineering), Stephen Jay Gould has shown how natural selection has prevented anybody from batting 400 over a season since Ted Williams in 1941 ( Full House)and I have learned all about the Swiss Army in John McFee's La Place de la Concorde Suisse.

For essays on food (and chewing gum), nobody tops South African-born Toronto/Barcelona/South of France resident Margaret Visser. In her 1994 book The Way We Are, I found out why Pythagoras commanded his vegetarian followers, "Abstain from beans!" And in September of that year I had the good fortune of taking Visser's photograph in her room at the Hotel Vancouver.

We discussed her mention in her book of the first sunbathing scene in French Literature. In 1902, the hero of André Gide's book L'Immoraliste took off his clothes and lay down in the sun.

This made me remember the first recorded incident in history of someone taking a sun bath. I had learned of this from my wonderful teacher, Brother Hubert Koeppen at St Edward's High School in Austin, Texas. Brother Hubert had instilled a love of history in me that had all started with such facts.

I asked Visser if she knew of that mention in ancient history involving Alexander the Great and Pindar the Poet in Thebes. Visser answered, "You have it wrong - It was Alexander and Diogenes the Cynic in Corinth." We made a $10 bet.

She wrote her address in my copy of The Way We Were and it was an address on Euclid Street in Toronto.  I also noticed that the book's dedication was in classic Greek. I knew I was in trouble.

A few weeks later, a neat handwritten letter arrived from Euclid Street. Included was a copy of a page from Plutarch's Lives in both English and Greek. It read,


"....a vote was passed to make an expedition against Persia with Alexander, and he was proclaimed their leader. Thereupon many statesmen and philosophers came to him with congratulations, and he expected Diogenes of Sinope also, who was tarrying in Corinth, would do likewise. But since the philosopher took not the slightest notice of Alexander, and continued to enjoy his leisure in the suburb of Craneion, Alexander went to see him; and found him lying in the sun. And when that monarch addressed him with greetings, and asked him if he wanted anything, 'Yes, 'said Diogenes, stand a little out of my sun.'" I sent Visser a cheque for $10.



I am about to re-read one of my favourite books. This is Visser's The Geometry of Love - Space, Time, Mystery, and Meaning in and Ordinary Church. This beautiful book about Sant'Agnese fuori le mura in Rome is a biography of a church that is not all that ordinary. One of the floors in the canonry of the 1,350-year-old building collapsed on April 12, 1855 and 105 people, including Pope Pius IV, fell through to the floor below. No one was injured.


For me entering a synagogue, a mosque, a Buddhist temple or my neighbourhood church will never be the same after having read this book. But Visser was up to her old tricks (Brother Hubert would have approved) in gently teaching us Greek and Latin and how they have put an indelible stamp in our language Would you ever guess that it was the virtuous St Peter who was the source of the word scandal?

Simon, son of Jonah, himself nicknamed Peter, "the stone, "was later to comment on the relationship between the crucifixion of Jesus (his "rejection") and his status now as "the corner stone" of the new view of the world. People who do not believe that Jesus is the Christ foretold will not think him a "cornersone" at all, Peter wrote; they will find him a "stumbling-block." The latter expression in Greek is petra skandalou , the origin of the English "scandal"; it means a stone that people fall over. Page 83, The Geometry of Love.



Margaret Visser



Are Cameras Dead?
Thursday, January 02, 2014



Rebecca under the Thuja - iPhone 3G



My very good friend and mentor, Raúl Guerrero Montemayor (he died early this year in Mexico City) used to define himself as, “Soy híbrido.” He meant that because he had been educated in Switzerland and spoke more than 8 languages he did not feel that he was from any particular country. His choice of híbrido was specialized but by his early 70s the blonde, blue-eyed man considered himself a Filipino.

The purpose of the above paragraph is to explain how languages treat words differently. If you say hybrid in English you might not think about a specialized-bred-in-a-nursery  rose but perhaps a Toyota Prius.

It may have been some 12 years ago when I spotted in London Drugs a toaster that had a built-in radio. Was it a radio with a toaster or the other way around?

Today between the clunky, heavy and expensive Digital Single Lens Reflex Cameras and the point and shoots there is an in-between camera, the so-called mirrorless cameras. My Fuji X-E1 is one of these “hybrids” perhaps?

Recently I was sent an interesting article from the New Yorker called Goodbye Cameras by Craig Mod. It is a startling essay in which Mod predicts the demise of all cameras and that these will be replaced by an awesome iPhone 6s in a very near future. He ends his essay with this:

Tracing the evolution from the Nikon 8008 to the Nikon D70 to the GX1, we see cameras transitioning into what they were bound to become: networked lenses. Susan Sontag once said, “While there appears to be nothing that photography can’t devour, whatever can’t be photographed becomes less important.” Today, it turns out; it’s whatever can’t be networked that becomes less important.

In the body of the essay he argues that the iPhone has replaced cameras. I believe that even though the author defines a camera as a box with a lens in the front and a sensor or film in the back, that a smart phone is no different. Some smart phones might have a lens on both sides but even though the box is flattened a smart phone is a camera with a phone or is that the other way around?

Lost in the argument in which images are mostly seen on iPads, tablets or at best on monitors, is the idea that an image (no longer called photographs these days, just pics),  is an image that is also a good portrait. Forests, selfies, cats, sunsets, party groups are there in myriads but there are few photographs with a sense of style. The playing field has been evened out by the sheer quantity of people taking pictures with their cameras.

There is a lot of writing and talk about the mechanics of these cameras and very little about what can be learned from observing one of these many images, if every once in a while, one stands out from that crowd. What it was taken with is irrelevant. 



Mrs. Brandon Right Now
Wednesday, January 01, 2014



Mrs. Brandon - Mathew Brady circa 1860-1865


I will do my best not to write art-speak. The photograph of Mrs. Brandon, a print from a wet collodion glass negative taken by Mathew Brady between 1860 and 1865 is striking to me. Let me explain.

Because it is not in colour it seems to be more a picture of today than one of almost two centuries ago. The colour in any picture we see today seems to date it. Lurid colours come from oversharpening and over saturating contemporary digital pictures. Pictures, particularly those taken with colour negatives in the 60s have that faded look. Ektachrome slides tended to be bluish and greenish. Kodachromes favoured oranges, yellows and reds.


Jo-Ann & Alex note reflector on right. The string left lowered paper backgrounds


It is more difficult to read into a b+w photograph.

Perhaps about 20 years ago I went to show of the Magnum agency photographs in Seattle. The show was sponsored by Kodak and now expenses were spared. Within that show I noticed one salient fact. This was that war photographers had suddenly availed themselves of the 24mm lens. This meant that they could get uncomfortably close to the action, by risking their lives! The particular optical distortion of the lens, not obvious in good 28 and 35mm lenses, made it all that obvious.

Tara - Window light and reflector


In Mathew Brady’s time the look of photographs in some ways attempted to copy the effect of one by a formal portrait painter. There was a respectful distance kept and the camera was far enough away to take full-length or knees up portraits. One of the first photographers to get close and to crop was Julia Margaret Cameron.

As I gaze at Mrs. Brandon and having read Robert Wilson’sn Mathew Brady – Portraits of a Nation I know that Brady, like most of his contemporaries had a large skylight over his studio floor. The slow exposures of the photographic materials of his time needed lots of light and even then sitters usually had a metal framework behind them that held them motionless. Not looking at the camera made it a bit easier for the sitter to refrain from blinking. 



Tara -Note flash softbox on right. Not too near so shadow on left not too dark

Before photography became the rage that it did by 1840 the most popular light for portraits (paintings) was window light. A window will make the side of a face close to it light but on the other side of the nose the light diminishes very quickly (those who must know can look up the inverse square law of light).

That contrast between one side of the face and the other could not be accommodated by the photographic materials of the time. They had poor tolerance for what we would now call shadow detail.
 
Tara - Softbox far away. Slow shutter to increase the lightness of background


So photographers “invented” skylight lighting, which really is an indoor imitation of a bright cloudy day. Shadows on a cloudy day are minimal. Paradoxically to the detriment of photography, Victorians used discarded (and not) glass negatives to make sun rooms/green houses so they could grow ferns and pineapples.

Photographers who shot in colour before the advent of digital cameras and in particular the old (old) ones had the terrible maxim of “the sun behind you”. People staring at cameras would squint at those noonday suns and the eyes would come out as empty eye sockets. Eventually some of the photographers caught on to shooting in cloudy days or under trees. But the colour films of the time accurately brought in the blue of a cloudy day or the green from under a tree. These pictures (before Photoshop) could be corrected with great difficulty.

If you happened to photograph businessmen in offices which were lit by overhead fluorescents, the effect in b+w somehow imitated Brady’s skylights. In colour the green made businessmen look sick.

With digital cameras and what is called custom white balance or white balance, the colour pictures in most situations will have clean whites no matter the situation, be it a snowy scene on the mountain (blue) or pictures taking with mixed lights like fluorescent with tungsten (light bulbs).


Jo-Ann - Far from window. Close to window the shadow would be darker.

But the colour and the quality (not as good quality but as a result of having been taken in colour) of the colour dates the photograph.

In Mrs. Brandon the lack of colour, the sharpness of the image, the modern look of the woman’s face in spite of what she is wearing, bring with it all a startling impact of taken just this instant.

For most of my photographic life I would not have been caught dead taking pictures with skylight lighting. For one I never had one. The closest was my Robson Street studio. I had a back wall that I painted middle gray. I painted the side wall white and on the opposite side I had a bank of windows overlooking the Eaton’s/then/Sears building which was one city block tall and wide white wall. If I wanted to increase the bouncing back of the window light from the white side wall I would incorporate a large white reflector as you see here in the portrait with me sitting with Jo-Ann.

But even when I could use this kind of window light with reflection back so that a face would almost be the same shade on both sides I avoided it.

A human face has curves. A photograph has some difficulty in showing curves because a photograph is in two dimensions. Curvature can be suggested by shadows. Flat lighting will flatten the body and the scene. Another quality of what I would call Flemish window lighting (the dark side of the face quite darkish) is that a chubby face will seem narrow.I used and use a small softbox (with flash) very close to my subject's face.

But now, after having seen Brady’s Mrs. Braandon, I will experiment this 2014 with the skylight look. I have no skylight. How will I do this?

I will pick a cloudy day and take one of my gray backgrounds to the garden. I will setup my  Manfrotto boom with my 6 foot long softbox and suspend it pointing down while giving lots of room for someone to sit or stand underneath.

As our friend Rachel Maddow often says on her MSNBC program, check this space for more.





A Hyper Realist New Year's Eve
Tuesday, December 31, 2013








It is not difficult for anybody to understand that some photographers, and particularly this one, have a fondness for hyper realistic painting. I admire Edward Hopper, and Canada’s Christopher Pratt, Alex Colville and Mayne Island's Jim McKenzie. I have a fondness for the not so realist Americans Thomas Eakins (also a fine photographer), Winslow Homer, all the Wyeths, and John Singer Sargent.

The above is probably because I am unsophisticated and I have a poor understanding of Jackson Pollock's dripped paintings.

With that out of the way I will now hope to dazzle some of you with the sense of wonder, delight (a smile came to my face) when I looked upon the front page of my NY Times this morning over my large mug of strong tea. 


Photograph by Damon Winter

My eyes caught Damon Winter’s photograph and because of the not excellent reproduction on newsprint, both the real Bloomberg and the realistic painting by John R. Friedman look identical. This was and is the kind of photograph that would not appear in those awful “The Year in Review” kinds of photographs that feature war, famine, death, assassination and more.

For the delight of any that might still be here I am featuring both my scan of the NY Times cover and the download from the on line version. It is my hope that in the spirit of the coming new year both Damon Winter and John R. Friedman (and of course the NY Times) will not sue me for copyright infringement.

Happy New Year to all who read my blog.



After Christmas Puttering
Monday, December 30, 2013





Tarren

Those ever more quick slow days between Christmas and New Year’s Day are perfect for doing nothing or in a different way of putting it, puttering.

I could go into the cold and humid darkroom and putter with negatives and make prints. Or I can somehow enter the 21st century and work with my monitor and computer.




But I never let old technology fade away completely. The pictures you see here were originally taken on Kodak TMZ 5054 a very fast 3200 ISO b+w film. I could have easily made some prints in the darkroom or scanned the negatives with my Epson Perfection V700 Photo scanner. What I did was scan four different images from the contact sheet. No matter how clean the scanner glass is or how many times you wipe clean the glossy contact, at the magnification needed for these images there is a lot of dust and stuff that need persistent work with Photoshop’s healing brush and clone stamp tools. 







Ghosts Of An Already Christmas Past
Sunday, December 29, 2013





When the family leaves late Christmas Eve Rosemary and I pick up a bit and get into bed knowing that on Christmas day we will not go anywhere. Even though the NY Times publishes on Christmas day it will not be waiting for us in the morning. That day’s edition will be wrapped with that of December 26. And so it was.



Since we do not have to go anywhere we can stay in our bed clothes to lounge around and eat sweets (marzipan and Belgian chocolates). Rosemary will drink lots of coffee and I will make many large mugs of strong tea.


By December 26, the Christmas tree’s base is empty of gifts and wrappings. By the 27th the living room is back to normal except for the tree.

Lauren would note that the JBL monitors (with their black front cloths) are back and that Ale took the AR-2ax speakers to Lillooet. I will miss their presence and their accuracy and I am slowly appreciating (I am rationalizing this!) the smoothness of the JBLs.

Today Ale loaded her van and left for Lillooet. I hope she will enjoy the AR sound system that she is taking and that she will share the beautiful sound in her solitude but with the company of her beloved cat Banjo. When she was gone, I almost cried. I was left feeling empty. She is so near and yet those curves and winter driving keep her so far.

All neat & tidy
She left my basement in beautiful order and I am not ashamed of going down there. The packing of the Manfrotto boom in a corner has given me the project and excitement of taking pictures in the spring that will resemble the skylight lighting of Mathew Brady’s portraits.

The pictures of the snow, three days before Christmas Eve, somehow give me a feeling of warmth but coldness at the same time. I cannot complain about our almost white Christmas. I took the pictures and all others here with the Fuji X-E1. That I have such a wonderful camera has all to do with the constant urging of my Rosemary and the technical backing and practical expertise of Jeff Gin from Leo’s Camera on Granville.




The living room as it is now, in spite of some of the warm colours, is empty of the humanity of my family. I hope we are all around to celebrate one more Christmas Eve and that the room will again be messy with torn wrapping and giggling granddaughters. 










     

Previous Posts
Sandrine Cassini On My Red Psychiatric Couch

The Paris Opera Ballet & Alonso King Lines Ballet

Sandrine Cassini - A Soon-to-be Visit by an Appari...

The Clubhouse On Second

Sound Holes

Faded - Recovered - Scanned - Delight

El Absurdo Infinito

Miss D, My Chickering Baby Grand & Fuji FP-100C

Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín



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5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17