A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Zephiro - Uccellini, Merula, Corelli, Frescobaldi, Marini & Enzo Ferrari
Saturday, November 30, 2013



 
Zephiro, from left Michael Jarvis, Paul Luchkow, Arthur Neele , Natalie Mackie & an Enzo Ferrari




On Thursday night I braved a chronic cough (kept at bay with lemon-flavoured Fishermen’s Friends) to attend the inaugural performance of Vancouver’s brand new small baroque group, Zephiro. The concert was held at the intimate room of the museum of the Vancouver Italian Cultural Institute on Slocan Street. Since I was on a budget I did not dine at La Piazza Dario Ristorante before the concert as my friends the Bakers did.

ZEPHYROS (or Zephyrus) was the god of the west wind, one of the four directional Anemoi (Wind-Gods). He was also the god of spring, husband of Khloris (Greenery), and father of Karpos (Fruit).

Ζεφυρος (Greek) Zephyros (transliteration) - Zephyrus, Favonius (Latin name) - West Wind (translation into English).

Museum Collection: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Catalogue No.: Boston 95.31
Beazley Archive No.: 205271
Ware: Attic Red Figure
Shape: Kylix
Painter: Signed by Douris
Date: ca 490 - 480 BC
Period: Late Archaic

Two figures representing either Zephyros, the winged god of the west wind, holding his lover Hyakinthos in a close embrace; or an allegorical depiction of Love (Eros) desiring and seizing the beauty of youth.


The group Zephiro is made up of Paul Luchkow and Arthur Neele on baroque violins, Natalie Mackie, viola da gamba and Michael Jarvis on harpsichord.

I know and I am friends with all but the new member, the Dutch gentleman Arthur Neele who is a compact violinist with a catchy smile and has an imposing knowledge of musical history especially of the Baroque period.



 I sat front row and the performers where a mere two meters away. It doesn’t take too much imagination to make believe that Zephiro was playing just for me inside my living room and that I was an Italian count. This is baroque music at its most intimate which seems to be something almost unique to our city and which thankfully for me (but not for the financially under-rewarded baroque musicians of Vancouver) gives me the privilege of sitting close and knowing the musicians and best of all I can leave my binoculars at home.

The concert featured Italian composers of the 18th century but also quite a few who where at their best in the earlier 17th century. I am no music expert but I can tell you that the music of the 17th century was not as set down to ready rules as that of the 18th century. These composers of what some call the Fantastic Period experimented with the use of odd/dissonant notes (I waited and was not disappointed with the last work of the first part of the concert, Biagio Marini’s (1594-1663) Sonata #13 “Senza Cadenza”. On of my baroque friends, virtuoso violinst Marc Destrubé calls them blue notes. There were plenty of these in Marini.

The first part also featured a harpsichord solo. I used to hate the instrument as a solo instrument, but thanks to Michael Jarvis and the Pacific Baroque Orchestra’s Alexander  Weimann I am warming up to it quickly.  The second part had a lovely Girolamo Frescobaldi (1583-1643) Canzona for solo bass but played by both Jarvis and Mackie,.The last time I had heard Frescobaldi played in a concert was back in Mexico City in 1963.
Anybody who loves the baroque will always anticipate with pleasure any music of Arcangelo Corelli. There were two sonatas featured on Thursday night. The first, Sonata IV Opus 4 was, for me just a warm-up preparation for the one moment of the night and this was Sonata III Opus 5 for violin and continuo. I am sure that soloist Paul Luchkow must have spent lots of money on baby sitters for his two young sons (or bribed his viola-playing wife) to practice this most beautiful (and most difficult, but then what would I know?) of all of Corelli’s sonatas.

If that was not enough to please me for a long time Zephiro finished with a Ciaccona by one of the few Italian composers whose surname does not end in, Tarquinio Merula (1594-1665). 

The Oxford Junior Companion to Music


While I am no music expert I know a bass ground when I hear one. My fave used to be (until Thursday night, that is) the very famous La Folia made justly famous in by Corelli in his Opus 5 Sonata No. 12 in D minor “La Folia”. I have written in these parts before that La Folia was sort of the 17th and 18th century’s version of Richard Berry’s Louie Louie. Everybody and his mother (but not Corelli’s) wrote some sort of variation or version.

Tarquino Merula’s Ciaccona, a true ground (see picture above), blew me away in Zephiro’s version. In spite of my virtuoso clapping the group did not come back to play it again.

This was unfortunate as I had the melody in my head all the way home. I told my wife that I was going to see if I could find it in YouTube. I told her the chances were slim.

I was wrong. There have to be more than 20 versions played by small groups, large groups, with pizzicato violin, with mandolins, with a trumpet, with recorders. There are perhaps more versions of this lovely ground than those of Joaquín Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez (including the one by Miles Davis). But then I did not take my chances to count all the Louie Louies or La Folia.

There is still time for anybody who just might be moved by my enthusiasm to catch this group this Saturday at


Le Marché St. George
4393 St. George at the corner of East 28th.at 7.00pm.

Meanwhile for anybody who wants to spend the rest of the night, as I am, listening to various versions of Merula's Ciaconna here are a few:

 Hesperion XXI with Jordi Savall

Il Jardino Armonico

Vespres d'Anardí

with Jordi Savall  and sung by Monserrat Figueras , not the Ciaconna but beautiful.

Contrasto Armonico with unusual pizzicato violin





Art Bergmann - A Legend Right Now
Friday, November 29, 2013



Art Bergmann


In 1977 when I was 34 years old I would put on a black leather jacket (purchased in un-hip Sears) and the rest of my outfit, Big John boots, T-shirt and jeans were all black. Then with a Pentax MX loaded with Kodak Technical Pan film and three lenses, a 120, a 50 and and a 28 I would head to the Commodore Ballroom or such places as Japan Hall, Russian Hall, Wise Hall and a few more places that are long gone like the Smiling Buddha. In these venues (most were joints) I would take pictures while my buddy and Vancouver Magazine rock critic (In One Ear) Les Wiseman would listen, discern as only he could.

In short order, Wiseman, with an ear that was highfalutin and snobbish,  taught me, like the good music critic that he was, to appreciate rock music at its best. He could quickly separate the wheat from the chaff, 

“If you are going to insist on listening to heavy metal make sure it’s Motörhead. Lou Reed is God. I am proud to never have gone to a concert by Images in Vogue.” 

For some concerts where our interest was in the warm-up band we would leave right after to ovoid the uncool headliners.

When most music critics of the conventional media of the time (and still conventional as it fades away) were avoiding punk concerts, proclaiming that they were violent and dangerous we went to as many as we could.

I will never forget that first time I ever heard and saw Art Bergmann (1977) fronting his K-Tels (later the Young Canadians) at the Smiling Buddha. As soon as I could I found a corner in the place to put down my camera so I could pogo (jump) with all the rest that were there. What must be funny in retrospect was that I was the only one (dressed in black) with an expensive briar pipe in my mouth!

Since 1977, while I am not a music critic, but I have been taught by the best, Les Wiseman, I can state here that I know a bit about music. 

Jim Carroll -  Alex Waterhouse-Hayward
In those early years Art Bergman and his band, the Young Canadians was one of the tightest (if not the tightest) three piece band in Canada. Yes they were a punk band in the beginning. But from there they progressed to a minimal (and tight) music machine that played songs (composed by Bergman and bassist Jim Bescott) that had unusually smart lyrics attached to guitar riffs from heaven.

In later bands Art Bergmann, who had some addictions from hell, navigated this self-made hell in an almost auto destruct mode so that his career when it was almost at the top (this happened many times) would plunge by a simple insult, from Bergmann, to a record exec or business promoter.

His music was not the  raw punk music of the Subhumans or D.O.A. variety. It had strong melody and lyrics that someone only like Jim Carroll of the Jim Carroll Band could possibly be compared with. And then there is the humour, the bittersweet humour of Bergmann’s lyrics from one of my all-time favourites:

Hospital Song

(Bergmann)

albums: Sexual Roulette + Design Flaw



Yes I know

What I've done

And I know

That it's wrong

Cuz I talked

To your mom

We watched you

All night long

I put a pillow

Under your head

Laid down some rags

You'd read

Friends sent cards

And flowers

Said they hoped

You got well





From your hospital bed

To my padded cell

There's not one thing

We need

This is heaven and hell





Maybe later

We'll get together

Learn how to relax

Maybe later

We'll get together

And have a relapse





I watch you sleep

In your tubes

And IV's

They kept your face

So clean

Would it seem

Too mean

If I pull the plug

On your dream machine

Would I be

Losing you

Or would we

Meet again





How I wish

You knew

How to live

How I wish

We'd known

How to live

 

Copyright © 2013 Theodore Stinks & Dr. Applefritter - All Rights Reserved.


Art Bergmann may be a legendary punk, but I would amend that as a legendary former punk who was born February 8, 1953 he is much more than that. Now 60, Bergmann is a legendary singer, guitar player, songwriter who does all that with passion (now) and is backed by a band, Kevin Lucks, bass, Stephen Drake, guitar and Adam Drake, drums that for me has moments of the K-Tels at the  Smiling Buddha, with only one difference they are now better.

Those lucky enough to be present at tonight’s show featuring Art Bergmann and his band at the Pawnshop in Edmonton should count their blessings. The former legendary punk has grown up.



Not Fading Away Gracefully
Thursday, November 28, 2013








In 1951 General Douglas MacArthur in a farewell speech said:

I am closing my 52 years of military service. When I joined the Army, even before the turn of the century, it was the fulfillment of all of my boyish hopes and dreams. The world has turned over many times since I took the oath on the plain at West Point, and the hopes and dreams have long since vanished, but I still remember the refrain of one of the most popular barrack ballads of that day which proclaimed most proudly that "old soldiers never die; they just fade away."

And like the old soldier of that ballad, I now close my military career and just fade away, an old soldier who tried to do his duty as God gave him the light to see that duty.

In many ways I think this also applies to old photographers like this one. And the comparison seems to fit photographers even better. We fade like a badly fixed photograph. They usually yellow and develop spots and ultimately they are gone.

But like MacArthur, we might fade away, slowly enough to make a bang here and there.

At age 71 I believe I am taking the best photographs of my life. My film based photographs cannot be retro because I am using film in a contemporary way. I make do with the best of two worlds by combining my slides, transparencies, negatives and darkroom printed b+ws with my Epson Perfection V700 Photo scanner. And on the rare occasion that the scanner will not do I go to DISC Imaging in Vancouver and Grant Simmons will expertly drum scan my stuff.

Working with both these worlds means that while I can print beautiful 16x20 prints on very good photographic paper I can also use digital files of my 6x7 cm transparencies (slides) to have DISC print giclées that surpass even light jet prints (digital files projected on photographic colour paper with a laser enlarger)in detail particularly in the shadows. Until now conventional colour film (both negative and slide) had awesome shadow detail that was limited in that they had to be printed in the photographic products of their time.

But all the above does not mean I have eschewed the use of digital camera. I have recently purchased a Fuji X-E1and I am learning how to use it without allowing me to have it tell me what to do! This camera has an available adaptor (which I purchased) which enables me to use all my old style (non autofocusing) Nikon lenses. Until I can figure out this camera’s eccentricities I use it just the way I use all my film cameras, with an accurate Minolta flash/exposure meter.

Today, I was able to see my latest cover for an arts weekly in Edmonton, Alberta. I am particularly pleased by the look that the designer gave to my photograph. This is, he did nothing to it and kept it clean. In this age this is amazing.

For those who may be curious on how I photographed singer/songwriter Art Bergmann here are the facts. I photographed him in my studio (I had one then) in March 2009. I used  a Mamiya RB-67 Pro-SD and a 90mm lens. My film was Ilford FP-4 which I rated at 100 ISO. I processed the film in Kodak HC-110 dilution B.

For light I used a Profoto ring flash modified to be plugged into a venerable (I purchased it in 1979) Norman 200B. I purposely mounted my camera crooked within the hole of the ring flash so that the lens would see the edge.



Improvements From The Past
Sunday, November 24, 2013





Evelyn Hart - 2000

In 2000 I was invited to take some snaps backstage at a Vancouver performance called Dancers for Life. I took a particular delight in taking pictures of two of my favourite dancers, Evelyn Hart and Crystal Pite.

Only very recently did I finally acquire a digital camera. All I had back in 2000 were my Nikons (an F-3 and two FM-2). I loaded a couple of them with very fast Kodak 3200 ISO film. My results were dramatic and awfully grainy.

It was more or less at this time that with an early Epson scanner I discovered (before I could do this simply by working with an RGB scan) that by scanning the negatives and telling the scanner that it was a colour negative, I would get a fine red/orange colour. With little skill the tone of skin could almost be made to resemble skin tone.


Evelyn Hart & Rex Harrington

 Even then I decided I did not want to spend (throw) money dealing with a desk top inkjet printer. I had a couple of the Evelyn Hart, one with dancer Rex Harrington, pictures done as fine giclées by one of the first labs in town that did them. I asked the lab to make images that were small. They made them 3 by 4 inches. A year later I photographed a Japanese/Canadian friend with fine grain film loaded on to a medium format camera, an RB-67 Pro-S. I used a powerful studio flash for these.

Having investigated the standards of propriety of medium.com, and firm in my resolve to not show bits in my personal blog or in my facebook or Twitter links I decided not to take any chances and place here one of those images without modification. Odri (how a Japanese person would pronounce the Audrey of Audrey Hepburn) as the image is called, here, is a censored version. 

Odri - 2001

 But important for the thread of this essay, a thread in which I put forth that in some cases an improvement is not so I would like those who have gotten this far to examine the images and note the wonderful (for me!) bits of sprayed ink. This look has disappeared with the new inkjet machines and the only way to get similar results would be to resurrect one from that past. The Odri pictures (they were five in a long frame and each one was very small, almost two by two and a half inches). You had to get close to discern and admire the bits of ink!



     

Previous Posts
Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín

From Simple To Complex

Leaning Towards Irrelevancy

Nevertheless She Persisted - For Allan Morgan - My...

El Reloj de Arena - The Hour Glass - Jorge Luís Bo...

An Officer and a Gentleman & An Anniversary

el ayelmado tripolio que ademenos es de satén rosa...

For Susanne Tabata's Media Class At the Art Instit...

Linda Melsted - The Music in the Violin does not e...



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10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17