A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

La Belle Sultane Discovered & We Laughed
Saturday, May 31, 2014


Rosa 'La Belle Sultane' May 31, 2014


In the late 40s and early 50s my mother and I would get on Tram 35 on Avenida Nahuel-Huapí in our Buenos Aires Coghlan neighbourhood and ride it to my abuelita’s apartment on Rodriguez Peña in downtown Buenos Aires. Sometimes my Uncle Tony and Aunt Dolly would also show up and the four would play music. Aunt Dolly wasn’t all that good on her violin, Uncle Tony was a fine tenor, my mother accompanied on the piano and my abuelita was a very good coloratura soprano. I remember that many of the songs where from American musicals of the 40s.

My mother wrote a poem about this here.


Rosa 'La Belle Sultane'

My youngest daughter Hilary resembles my mother lots. She leads a busy working life and has a husband who also has a busy working life. They have two daughters; one of them is a terrible load.

I attempt to make Saturdays a sort of tram-35-kind-of-day. I prepare a good menu and pick a film that the four of us (Hilary, Lauren, Rosemary and me) can watch. Rebecca works on Saturdays so we have not seen her at our dinner table since Christmas Eve dinner.

I attempt to make Saturdays a sort of tram-35-kind-of-day by making sure the afternoon goes smoothly, pleasantly and best of all with a film that will make us all laugh. Today’s film was The Son of the Pink Panther with Herbert Lom, Roberto Benigni and Claudia Cardinale. We laughed lots and lots. Best of all was the opening score in which the cartoon Pink Panther directs an orchestra of black musicians (headed by Bobby McFerrin) who sort of make like they are playing instruments (but they are not) but are actually scatting. When I mentioned the word Lauren inquired and I explained. “They are singing without words and are imitating jazz musical instruments.”

The evening ended with laughs but it was not so all day. After our dinner of Mexican pinto beans, barbecued flank steak (Lauren loves it and calls it chewy meat), grilled corn-on-the-cob, and cucumber salad, I suggested we take a stroll in the garden which looks its best in late afternoon light. It was then that Rosemary said, “Moving or getting rid of all these plants will be very sad and terrible.”

Now my Rosemary has been known in making a string of statements in which I count, “One, two, three and so on…” to my initial statement of, “Rosemary you are extremely negative.” Before we went inside to see our film I said, “Well tonight you can worry about all those plants and you can have a pleasant insomnia.”


Rosa 'Mary Magdalene' May 31, 2014

The fact is that Rosemary usually says out loud what I think and dare not say. We think alike in many ways. We both worry about our eldest granddaughter and have sleepless nights.

I sometimes (well not sometimes but often) wonder how people can live alone. I could not live without Rosemary on my side and by my side.

The day went well in other aspects in which the final resolution came about because Rosemary (am I negative, too?) has the habit of being thorough in her fall and spring cleaning of the garden. She uses a bamboo rake and this is why so many of my plant labels disappear and then forget the name of the plant.

In the beginning of a gardener’s career, know which plant is where in the garden and what it is, is important. In the 90s we visited American hosta gardens in Maryland, North Carolina, Washington and Georgia that felt like museums. The hostas were placed so that none encroached on each other. They were all beautifully labelled and some extra retentive gardeners had their gardens displayed by plants ordered in the classification of either species or cultivars. The latter were sometimes grouped by hybridizers. The Alex Summers hostas were here and the Mildred Seaver’s there.

Now in 2014 most of my plants are labelled or at least I remember. Rosemary remembers her plants. But there are some hostas whose labels are long gone and there is no way I will ever know who (my plants are people in case you wondered) they are. And it’s not important.

But it is important if the members of the Vancouver Rose Society who will be coming to our open garden in mid June to know the name of every rose.

Four years ago I purchased a Robin Denning/ Brentwood Bay Nursery rose at UBC’s Shop in the Garden adjacent to the UBC Botanical Garden. My Rosemary works as a FOG (Friend of the Garden) there on Wednesdays. At the time my interest in once-blooming but hardy and cast iron Gallica roses was in full-swing (still is). I bought the rose knowing it was going to be deep red and the name was a famous one.

Rosa 'Munstead Wood', May 31, 2014

Four years later the bush is huge, tall and full of buds and flowers that are a deep maroon with golden centres. The sign is long gone. Robin Denning could not remember what the rose could have been. I sent him scans. We compared notes on the shape of the leaves (quite important in some cases as in this one) if the canes had many thorns or not, etc.

At first, Denning suggested Rosa ‘Rose Marie Viaud’, Rosa ‘Bleu Magenta’ and Rosa ‘Violette’.

I had tentatively picked a famous Gallica Rosa 'La Belle Sultane' as the one. It was only until both of us looked up La Belle Sultane and Rosa ‘Gallica Violacea’ (aka violette), that we realized that Rosa ‘Gallica Violacea’ was another name for the same rose.

Come mid June La Belle Sultane will be correctly identified as well as another that Select Roses man Brad Jalbert (who sold it to me, Rosemary swept the label) identified as RosaSouvenir du Dr. Jamain’ which is a dark red and very fragrant Hybrid perpetual from mid 19th century.

 
RosaSouvenir du Dr. Jamain'


Of late I have become enthusiastic again in scanning my roses. Today I scanned Rosa ‘Mary Magdalene’ and a newish English Rose (dark red) Rosa ‘Munstead Wood’. As you might guess most of the roses in our garden are picked for scent and these have lots of that. The former is of myrrh and he second a fruity old-rose smell. Both are David Austin English Roses.

I hope that when that decision has to be made on the fate of our plant friends that Rosemary and I will be able to make it together. And when that happens I hope we will have had lots more tram-35-kind-of-days in which not only will we laugh with Hilary and Lauren but with Rebecca, too.




Caitlin Legault - Art Model
Friday, May 30, 2014

My Mother's Red Shawl - El Rebozo Colorado
Cailtin Legault - Art  Model





Nudes, Danishes & Roses

Once upon a time, I was contacted by photographer Alex Waterhouse-Hayward.

At first his name did not ring a bell. But once I saw his work, I realized I had already seen it many times before. To me, the depth and calibre of his photos represented everything I hoped to be a part of.

I am an art model. Most of my experience comes from posing for painters, sculptors and drawing groups. I am told I am photogenic, but I think I still have a lot to learn when it comes to photography.

Hearing from Alex was both encouraging and terrifying.

Alex told me I reminded him of Charlotte Corday, the assassin who stabbed Jean Paul Marat (one of the most outspoken leaders of the French Revolution) to death in his bath. It must be the wide set eyes I thought.

Fast forward to Thursday May 29th, and I am parked outside his house. The plan was to do a few simple shots for his Red Shawl project. I had just come from work, so I did my makeup the best I could in the rear view mirror. My hair was a lost cause, but I had a plan for that. The butterflies were in full parade.

As I opened the front gate I stood in awe at the beautiful heritage cottage Alex calls home. I found myself suddenly at peace. The quaint entrance and fragrant garden put my mind at ease.

I was greeted at the door by a very sweet little lady, whom I soon learned was Rosemary, Alex’s wife of over 47 years.

Alex was called to the door, and that is when I was able to finally meet him face to face. No more butterflies. After a quick chat about life, love and everything in between, I knew this would not be our last encounter. He was funny in the cynical kind of way, which I much prefer.

It was time to shoot, so Alex handed me the red shawl and off I went to the powder room to prepare myself. I quickly shed my clothes and donned my favourite blue velvet robe. The plan I had for my hair depended solely on this red shawl, I had to wrap it around my hair and make it stay. It was thicker and heavier than I expected so it took a few tries. Then last but not least I pulled out my beloved ‘aqua mystic’ topaz ring and squeezed it onto my middle finger. I am hopelessly sentimental, and this ring holds a lot of power for me. Therefore I have hopelessly been sneaking it into anything I can get away with.Marlene Dietrich (my favourite old Hollywood star) also had a beloved topaz ring.

Now here is the thing about assumptions, you should never make them. I had assumed that I was to do this shoot in the nude. As an art model I spend a large portion of my days being naked. The red shawl project showcases an array of personalities from all walks of life. The series often portrays the subjects wearing something that correlates with their chosen career. My job only requires me to wear my birthday suit. I just could not imagine portraying myself with the red shawl in any other way.

I was ready to disrobe, but I got the slightest feeling that I should double check. I asked Alex if he minded if I went nude, of course he was polite enough to grant my wish. Off went my robe, and I felt much better.

Alex took one shot and showed me the result right away, I loved it! He said we could have stopped right then and there. Since we were already there, we decided a few more for good measure might be best.

They say diamonds are a girl’s best friend, but I say good lighting is a woman’s best friend. Alex afforded me some very flattering lighting, and I will forever be in debt to him for making me look so beautiful.

After many more flashes and giggles, both photographer and model were feeling happy. So the shoot was called to an end.Lucky for me the fun wasn’t over yet.

Alex pulled out a large box of black and white photographs for me to admire while he went off to the kitchen to retrieve some refreshments. He returned with a tray that shouted “Welcome!” There was a pot of Earl grey tea unlike any I had ever tasted, complete with milk and sugar of course! The gracious host had even prepared a round of warm cream cheese Danishes.  I was in heaven, surrounded by great art, good tea, fresh pastries and wonderful company.

I took deep breaths, trying to slow down time. I could smell the old books and old wood that made up his house. The late afternoon sun was still filling the room with light. I could see hints of his garden teasing me through every window. I wanted to see his garden so badly, but I did not want to be intrusive. Thankfully I think he got the hint, and after he let me gobble back to last Danish (because art models eat what they want) he invited me on a quick garden tour.

Alex’ garden boasts an impressive amount of rose varieties, so much in fact that he is hosting some kind of rose club soiree in his back yard this summer. Seriously, Alex is that guy.

I sniffed and smiled and smiled and sniffed. These are the kinds of moments one must file away under ‘Happy Places’.

It was time for me to go, so I sniffed my last rose, thanked Alex profusely and after getting beyond the awkward handshake I was able to lean in for a goodbye hug.

I cannot say enough about my experience that day with Alex, he really left an impression on me. His profound work, his beautiful home, garden and inspiring spirit, these are the things some can only dream of having. I am so very grateful of be a part of this dream.


Holly McRea Model - Poet - Creation Conduit.
Lisa Ha Model - Volunteer - Friend
Carmen Alatorre Diseñadora de vestuario
Roberto Baschetti Sociólogo, Investigador Histórico - Amigo
Jennifer Froese Youth Worker
Rachel Cairns Actor
Jennifer Landels Espadachina
Judith Currelly Pilot- Artist
Jim Erickson Set Decorator
Alexandra Hill Soprano
Georgina Elizabeth Isles Figure Model
Emma Middleton Actor
Mark Pryor Author/Lawyer/Assistant DA Travis County TX
Brother Edwin Charles Reggio, CSC Mentor & Teacher
Veronica Vex Burlesque Dancer
George McWhirter Poet
Raúl Guerrero Montemayor Padre-Compadre
Alexandra Waterhouse-Hayward Maestra
Shirley Gnome Singer/Provocateur
Yeva & Thoenn Glover Dancers/Choreographers
JJ Lee Writer
Jacqueline Model
Cathy Marsden Psychiatrist
André De Mondo Wanderer
Colin MacDonald Saxophonist/Composer
Nina Gouveia Yoga Instructor
Stacey Hutton Excercise Physiologist
Colleen Wheeler Actor
Sarah Rodgers Actor, Director,Mother
Tim Turner - Real Estate Agent
Kiera Hill Dancer
Johnna Wright & Sascha Director/Mother - Son/Dreamer
Decker & Nick Hunt Cat & 19th century amateur
George Bowering Poet
Celia Duthie Gallerist
Linda Lorenzo Mother
Katheryn Petersen Accordionist
Stefanie Denz Artist
Ivette Hernández Actress
Byron Chief-Moon Actor/Dancer
Colin Horricks Doctor
Ian Mulgrew Vancouver Sun Columnist
Jocelyn Morlock Composer
Corinne McConchie Librarian
Rachel Ditor Dramaturg
Patrick Reid Statesman, Flag Designer
Michael Varga CBC Cameraman
Bronwen Marsden Playwright/Actress/Director
David Baines Vancouver Sun Columnist
Alex Waterhouse-Hayward Photographer
Lauren Elizabeth Stewart Student
Sandrine Cassini Dancer/Choreographer
Meredith Kalaman Dancer/Choreographer
Juliya Kate Dominatrix







That Sensational Caitlin
Thursday, May 29, 2014





Those who might read this blog with some frequency might know of my project of taking pictures of people I know who come from all walks of life. They pose wearing my mother’s antique, red Mexican rebozo. My subjects then have the obligation of having to write some sort of an essay. I have over 40 and about 12 more that ignore my pleas for submitting their essay.

Today Caitlin who calls herself an art model promptly showed up for her red shawl session.

I must point out here that the prospect of taking pictures of someone you know by email with no idea of voice or poise can be quite exciting.

But I was not prepared for a tall woman with a generous smile and a nice set of teeth who I could not fathom as she was pleasant, gracious and articulate. Do such people exist these days? I never saw her check her cell phone. If she had one it remained in her purse for the three hours she was posing and  having tea and cakes in the living room.

Now my Rosemary has patiently remained by me for 47 years in spite of my penchant for taking photographs of the undraped woman. She was expecting something more conventional as my red shawl series are conventional in that my subjects are dressed and the poses are not in the least salacious.

You can imagine what Rosemary must have thought when she heard Caitlin say, “You don’t mind if I pose nude, do you?” Caitlin sat for me with my mother’s red shawl on her head but somehow managed to cover most of herself. Rosemary saw this as she went up the stairs! When I had my downtown studio, my homelife and my photography life somehow did not mix. It was neat by being separate.

I took one initial picture and I could have quit right then and there. Caitlin would move from one wonderful pose to another so I found myself saying, “Don’t move.”

Here is the Fuji b+w Instant print scanned.

I hope that Caitlin will pose for me soon. I tried not to sound so exuberant and kept my cool. Perhaps this might have been the wrong technique and I should have told her she was sensational (a word my friend Sean Rossiter uses sparingly). And sensational she was. 





Flavian - Flavus - What's In A Name?
Wednesday, May 28, 2014



Geranium maculatum 'Beth Chatto' & fern Adiantum pedatum,  Fuiji Instant Print


In a parallel history in a parallel world to ours, Roman emperor Flavius Circinalis pushed the Roman Empire beyond the borders of emperor Trajan and went as far as the banks of China at what is now the Sea of Japan. He and his army built galleys and crossed the waters to Japan. There Flavius Circinalis defeated the army of Tokudama but had to eventually withdraw, as Alexander did, when he found himself much too far from his supply bases.

This train of thought comes to mind every time I look upon a beautiful hosta called Hosta tokudama ‘Flavo Circinalis’. If you have studied Latin in your past (and for this to be a fact you must be at least 70) you would know that flavus means yellow but that there were in fact Flavian emperors with yellow not being the connection. Hosta tokudama 'Flavo Circinalis' is variegated with lots of yellow.


Geranium maculatum 'Beth Chatto' May 28, 2014

One of the pleasures of gardening and walking in one’s garden is to reminisce on the names of plants. In some cases the plants will have names associated with people I have met and been friends with. My Hosta ‘Sea Dream’ has the face (in my imagination) of Mildred Seaver from Needham Heights, Massachusets. She befriended my Rebecca many years ago when we traveled to Washington, D.C. for a convention of the American Hosta Society.

My North Van friend Allen Cooke’s Rhododendron augustinii ‘Marion McDonnell’ purple blue in early spring in my garden reminds me of Marion McDonnell who used to be called the Blue Poppy Lady. I often visited her in her Shaughnessy garden for coffee, cookies and a chat. Most of our city’s Meconopsis betonicifolia came from her garden.

Rosa complicata sometimes listed as a Gallica rose was originally brought to me in a little pot by Cooke who said to me, “If you are going to have one rose in your garden is has to be this one.” Complicata was indeed one of my first roses. Now I have around 85.

Ferns are beautiful beasts and their names reflect that. The ostrich fern (whence fiddle heads come from) has the unromantic name Matteuccia struthiopteris. You have to ignore that name (in fact most easily forgotten) to love this plant of which I have many in my garden from the one original plant sold to me by Nan Fairchild Sherlock, aka “The Fern Lady”. I asked her at a VanDusen plant sale if I should buy another. She smiled and gently nodded a negative.

And so I tend to gravitate to not only the plants named for my friends such as Hosta ‘Alex Summers’ but to people I do not know but I am still fascinated by.

Consider Geranium maculatum ‘Beth Chatto’. Chatto is an English plantswoman (only the English could invent such a word!) born in 1923 and must still be alive as I have not been able to locate an obituary. Her name is not in the least romantic sounding. Consider Artemisia ludoviciana 'Valerie Finnis'. Finnis, another English plantswoman who died at age 81 in 2006 has a much nicer sounding name. And this particular artemesia is one of my Rosemary’s favourites. It is interesting that one of the Artemisias in ancient history was a female naval commander under the Persian Xerxes.

Rosa 'Mme. Pierre Oger' Add caption

Going back to that Geranium maculatum ‘Beth Chatto’ which I purchased in 1990, Rosemary says that unlike many other geraniums this one has feminine foliage and habits (it does not intrude and stays where it is put). But Chatto? For anybody reading this a geranium is not your ordinary potted geranium, particularly those red ones. Those (and my Rosemary would lift her nose a tad up into the air) are called pelargoniums which indeed are part of the geranium genus but are not hardy as they originally came from South Africa. The Portuguese explorers who round South Africa brought back these pelargoniums and from Portugal they were taken to Spain and the Spaniards took them to the New World. The pelargonium is ubiquitous in Lima where they tolerate poor soil, high heat and drought.

The geraniums, Rosemary’s geraniums are extremely hardy and a few have flowers that are startlingly blue. Blue is one of Rosemary’s favourite garden colours because it is rare.

Of all the plants in my garden the ones that evoke more daydreaming and curiousity are my roses. I have written before that my favourite scent is that of the Magnolia grandiflora (the Southern Magnolia). There are splendid paintings of the huge white flower at the National Gallery in Washington D.C. But there is no romatic English plantswoman or French queen associated with this magnolia. You can imagine a huge herbivore dinosaur being attracted to the scent and then munching on the very large and thick leaves. But that’s it. There is no romance.

But Valerie Finnis! Or Rosa ‘Mme Pierre Oger’ hybridized by Verdier in France in 1878! This latter Bourbon Rose a sport (a mutation of Rosa ‘Reine Victoria’) makes me wonder who Monsieur Pierre Oger was. Could he have been a friend of  Louis-Eugène-Jules Verdier?. Or could he have been his brother-in-law. One of the loveliest dark red roses in my garden is English Rose Rosa ‘L.D. Braithwaite’ named after David Austin’s (the hybridizer) brother-in-law.

Now here is the description of Rosa ‘Mme. Pierre Oger’ as in my rose bible, Peter Beales – Classic Roses

Very pale silvery-pink, translucent, cupped flowers with the form of small water lilies, sweetly scented.


To me Mme. Pierre Oger would have been a Grace Kelly look-alike, dainty, feminine, high strung and beautiful.

I am not sure if I am doing a good job of explaining my intention. A plant that may be millions of years old without change (the magnolias) have less of a visceral feeling in my heart than a rose, hybridized or found as a sport in some garden in France in the 19th century. Millions of years is much too old for comfort. A rose that could have been admired by Queen Victoria has more history and more connection for me.

Hosta ‘Alex Summers’ brings to mind the low voiced stutter of my friend Alex Summers who once told me:

A garden must have sun, shade and water. Of the latter you must make sure you can hear it. It takes 7 years to have a garden. The first year you plan it. The next two years you plant it. The next two years it matures. On the seventh year you enjoy it. It then declines and you start all over again.



Our Garden May 24, 2014
Monday, May 26, 2014





Last Saturday the 24 of May, 2014 I took some snaps of our garden with my Fuji X-E1. I did this in the late afternoon because I wanted to have less contrast and show some of the darker areas of the garden. In the end I gave up selecting just a few. I have subjectively put up my faves. You might note that there are some near duplicates. On May 24 just a few roses were in bloom but our many rhododendrons were showing off their colour. The hostas all look pristine and not affected by either slugs or cut worms. We are getting our garden ready for a mid June opening for the Vancouver Rose Society.























































     

Previous Posts
Beauty in Monochrome

Two (almost) Crazy Women

Crazy Over Love

La Tormenta de Santa Rosa

Two With Poise & Elegance

Guillermina Santa Bárbara Cheers Me Up

Mona Lisa - Overdrive

Two Evangelists & That Important Severed Right Ear...

A suo piacere

An Odalisque in 3200



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5/24/09 - 5/31/09

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6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

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8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

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8/30/09 - 9/6/09

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9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

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2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

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3/21/10 - 3/28/10

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4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

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5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

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6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

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7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

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8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

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7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

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8/3/14 - 8/10/14

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8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

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10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

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4/19/15 - 4/26/15

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5/24/15 - 5/31/15

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6/21/15 - 6/28/15

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9/20/15 - 9/27/15

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11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

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4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

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11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

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5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

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7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17