A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Marina Hasselberg - Cellist
Saturday, February 14, 2015

 
I Am Cello
Lawren - June 21, 2012




Marina Hasselberg - Cellist - February 14 2015


My brain is a finely tuned A string
Plucking and picking itself out of tune
And though out of tune itself
Molds and bends to be in tune
Relative to others.

My skin like a mahogany fingerboard
Is constantly pressed
And squeezed and slapped
—Abused by my own hand.

My mouth and tongue are f-holes
Through which my inner vibrations
Are released into the air.

My heart is a bridge
Keeping my thoughts
In their rightful place
But also connecting
My body and mind.




My bones make up my sound-post
Holding me together
And providing the structure
Necessary to speak.

My feet are an endpin
Grounding me
And connecting me
To my surroundings.




Occasionally a bow comes along
Forcing me to do or say
The opposite of my desires
Moving me
And playing me
Like an instrument,
A toy.

I am a cello
Here to say what I want
How I want.
Though my strings need occasional tuning,
I decide how they sound
And when they sound.
Although I am sometimes used by others
For their gain
I am always in control of my expression.

Marina
More Marina
And even more Marina
 


 





Theodora, Good Grief! That's Charlie Brown
Friday, February 13, 2015



Theodora

My friend and mentor Malcolm Parry (former editor of Vancouver Magazine, Western Living, Vista and now gossip and business columnist for the Vancouver Sun) has a theory that he calls the privileged view. If you are on the roof of a very tall building, it is privileged. If you are at ground level looking up, you are not.

 

Anybody can purchase (if tickets are purchased before they invariably sell out) for today’s Early Music Vancouver presentation of the Handel oratorio Theodora in Seattle, tomorrow in Vancouver and Sunday in Victoria. You might think that such an event is privileged. After all it is difficult to boast that you will see Theodora in your lifetime as this oratorio is not often performed. This is true.
True privilege is to witness two performances, within days (statistically most unlikely) and even more privileged if one of them is a dress rehearsal.

Such was my privilege yesterday Thursday at St. Andrew Wesley on Burrard and Nelson. I must first define an Early Music rehearsal.  Nobody is wearing monkey suits or black clothing. The dress part of the rehearsal means that the performance will be done with almost no breaks (except for tuning or a breather or two). One advantage to this is that the four solo singers are in their street clothes, they do not look like would-be gods up on the stage but down-to-earth (they even smile, used laptops and smart phones) humans.

Lawrence Zazzo, countertenor - Zachary Wilder, tenor
 
Sitting on the pew a mere four feet away you can enjoy their talent in a refreshing new way. You can see them make a few mistakes and how they laugh them off.

Since I was not confined to a designated seat at the Chan I could move around and watch the natural horn players from the back. The instruments with a big bell look like the bell is attached to a brass hula-hoop!


Andrew Clarke, Steve Desroche - horns
After attending many performances of baroque orchestras I was able to quickly answer a question from one of the sweetest voices on CBC Radio, Sheryl MacKay (North by Northwest). She wanted to know why one of the cellos had such a thick neck. MacKay was there as she could not attend Saturday night’s performance as she has to get up at four in the morning for her program on Sunday. I told her that the cello in question was a violone which unlike the cello has frets and is larger.


Soile Stratkauskas , flute

Watching and then listening to PBO Music Director’s few instructions to his orchestra you come to the conclusion that the idea that conductors can be bombastic is not often true. Alexander Weimann does it all with piano subtlety and very good taste. I saw some of his expressions by depositing myself behind and looking through the legs of the central male chorus (the sopranos stage right, the altos stage left). I was flummoxed by one male standing with the female altos. I asked and I was told that he is a countertenor. Sometimes they are called male altos. The singers are the Vancouver Cantata Singers.

Weimann can smile ecstatically but it was also fun to be as close to Weimann’s back. From that vantage point I could see the constant smiles of delight on lute player Konstantin R. Bozhinov. Although Bulgarian he speaks a perfect Queen's English so he must find Weimann's German accented English cute.

Alexander Weimann
 
While the church was mostly empty (I was one of the few lucky ones) I understood that the acoustics were excellent. Not knowing about sound I will have to ask violinist Paul Luchkow who is also a sound engineer if the Chan can reproduce the reverberation of a large church. A few of the beautiful stained glass windows were lit by being next door to the church chapel. The surrounding of the wooden church pews all added to my delight of the occasion.
But in the end it was watching the solo singers, up close that made my evening a memorable one.

If you think that singers such as these can be boring in real life I can provide the evidence to the contrary with the example of mezzo-soprano Kristina Szabó dressed in a little black skirt, black tights, black almost knee-high boots, a brown leather jacket of a most complex manufacture, dramatic eye shadow – all the very image of the lead singer of that iconic Hungarian punk band of the past, the Puskás Dribble.

Krisztina Szaabó , mezzo-soprano









Lawrence Zazzo , countertenor


Centre, Konstantin R. Bozhinov, lute player





Matthew Brook, bass-baritone


Zachary Wilder, tenor


Nathalie Paulin, soprano - Lawrence Zazzo, countertenor





Hoover Sucked Me In With A Bagless Mess
Thursday, February 12, 2015





February 9, 2015


Dears Sirs,

 
I have a Hoover vacuum model SH40060 which I purchased at London Drugs about two years ago here in Vancouver. I asked the store manager if I could plug in some of the vacuums to test their noise level. The Hoover while not all that silent, did not have a high frequency whine.

Since that purchase I have come to believe that the intentions to design this vacuum might have been good but the end result is a terrible contraption which at my age (72) makes me wonder if I have to spend, yet again on a new one.
My repeated complaints to your on line service have only gotten me, “These are the sevice centres near your area.”

The Hoover has these design problems:

1.    When you lift the vacuum, to perhaps pass it over stairs the gaskets give way and the machine loses sucking power.

2.    The plastic hose has a memory so it twists all the time. One has to un-twist it.

3.    Because of 2 and because the wire leading to the motor in the revolving carpet wand is in that hose the motor now works intermittently.

4.    When you remove the carpet sweeping wand to use one of the two accessories a plastic mold within the wand falls out.

5.    The brush accessory is hard to put away or remove. I have arthritis. The corner accessory is much too loose and falls out.

6.    Cleaning this vacuum is a real chore and one must be diligent to notice if the cyclonic action is indeed turning or blocked.

7.    The retractable chord retracts all the time when one does not want it to. Pulling out to make sure it stays out involves many attempts.

8.    I know it must be some Canadian law (so that vacuums can only be used in small condos and not in homes) but the power chord is simply not long enough.

9.    I have had many cases of putting the hose in its place on the flimsy grab on the back. Then as I carry the vacuum up the stairs for storage in one of the closets I find myself holding the dust container while the rest of the unit falls down the stairs.

In short this unit is one of the worst vacuums I have ever owned. I plan to save up enough money when this unit finally goes to its maker in the dump, and buy a better designed vacuum for which I might get some satisfaction.

 Sincerely yours,

 Alex Waterhouse-Hayward
 
I received an immediate response to the above which consisted of a pleasant man directing me to my closest authorized service centre.

 

 

 



Me And My Fishnets & Pancho
Wednesday, February 11, 2015

 




Marina Hasselberg







Marina Hasselberg cellist

Fishnets

More fishnets

And more fishnets

More of them

Fetish for fishnets

Fishnets and Restoration Hardware

Miss Moneypenny's fishnets

Siouxie's fishnets



Theodora - The World Have Ears And Hear Not
Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Curtis Daily & Amelia (his baroque bass), 41st Avenue Vancouver


One of Handel's most loyal and enthusiastic supporters, Mary Delany, wrote to her sister Ann saying "Don't you remember our snug enjoyment of "Theodora?" Her sister replied "Surely "Theodora" will have justice at last, if it was to be again performed, but the generality of the world have ears and hear not".



A nasty Roman emperor tells a Christian virgin that unless she renounces her faith she will be executed horribly. He further tells her Roman soldier companion the same thing.  They both refuse and die together.
A nasty Roman prefect tells a Christian virgin that unless she renounces her false Christian god she will be sent to a brothel. She refuses. While men lick their lips deciding who will be first, a Roman soldier comes to the rescue. The Christian virgin dresses in his clothes and he in hers. He is caught. Both decide to die together.

These similar plots are centuries apart. The former, from the 1942 novel The Robe by Lloyd C. Douglas became the basis for the first ever, 1953, Cinemascope film The Robe, with Gene Simmons and Richard Burton and the wonderfully horrific and cruel Caligula played by Jay Robinson. I saw this film with my parents in Buenos Aires in 1953. The inspiration for the book came from the question, “What happened to the soldier who at Christ’s crucifixion won His clothes (the very red robe) in a game?
The latter plot written by librettist Thomas Morell for Handel’s oratorio Theodora  which was performed for the first time at Covent Garden in 1750.
In my personal obsession to find links the only one I could find was an ecclesiastical on. Thomas Morell was a Garrison Chaplain at Portsmouth barracks in 1775 and Lloyd C. Douglas was a minister. Interesting for those who are Early Music Vancouver and Pacific Baroque Orchestra fans is the fact that Morell wrote the libretto for the August, 7, 2014 performance (an EMV production with the PBO) of Handel’s Il Trionfo del Tempo (1707).

Former Artistic Director of Early Music Vanocouver (now – Artistic Director Emeritus Early Music Vancouver) the Birkenstock man from Curaçao has this to say of Handel’s Messiah when I asked him to answer the question, “Why Bach?”

 Let me step on some toes with this one. Here goes: The simple answer is, "Bach? Of course!" My background in the European tradition that focuses on Bach rather than the Messiah around Christmas and Easter still has an impact. The powerful Mengelberg tradition of the Matthew Passion with the Concertgebouw Orchestra, for example ("early music" of a different kind!) kept people huddled around the radio on Palm Sunday, and the streets were deserted. Not to offend anyone; there's of course nothing wrong with Messiah — but personally I would rather sit through the Passions or the Christmas Oratorio on hard pews in a cold church (as I have done many times) than hear another Messiah in a comfortable concert hall.

This brings us to my belief that the Oratorio Theodora is the intelligent (you may say sophisticated if you like) Handel work to like. It is rarely performed although Handel himself had a personal preference for it. Both Handel and Morell were ahead of their time with this oratorio that is sometimes performed as an opera. It was around the time of the French Revolution, 1789 that the so called “rescue operas” became popular. The trend culminated with Beethoven’s Fidelio.
In the picture illustrating this blog you can see baroque bassist (Portland Baroque Orchestra) Curtis Daily posing by the EMV poster on 41st Avenue. It features my English Rose Rosa ‘L.D. Braithwaite’ a red rose appropriate for the Valentine Day’s performance of Theodora.

Over lemon cake and tea, Daily told me that Theodora has an absolute killer aria in the first act. This means that unlike Messiah we do not have to wait until the end for the best.

Now for the bad news which are not so bad if you have a vivid imagination. In an oratorio the singers dress formally and in an opera version they would be in costume. This means that in Saturday’s Theodora you will have to imagine that Theodora at some point dresses as a man and Didymus, her manly saviour, as a woman. Consider that I was not able to find one single image of that cross dressing feat in all of Google!

A double double bass date

Curtis Daily

The violone player got extra pay



My Feet Are An Endpin
Monday, February 09, 2015


I Am Cello
Lawren - June 21 2012




 
My brain is a finely tuned A string
Plucking and picking itself out of tune
And though out of tune itself
Molds and bends to be in tune
Relative to others.

My skin like a mahogany fingerboard
Is constantly pressed
And squeezed and slapped
—Abused by my own hand.

My mouth and tongue are f-holes
Through which my inner vibrations
Are released into the air.

My heart is a bridge
Keeping my thoughts
In their rightful place
But also connecting
My body and mind.

My bones make up my sound-post
Holding me together
And providing the structure
Necessary to speak.

My feet are an endpin
Grounding me
And connecting me
To my surroundings.

Occasionally a bow comes along
Forcing me to do or say
The opposite of my desires
Moving me
And playing me
Like an instrument,
A toy.

I am a cello
Here to say what I want
How I want.
Though my strings need occasional tuning,
I decide how they sound
And when they sound.
Although I am sometimes used by others
For their gain
I am always in control of my expression.



We Could, We Did & We Regretted It
Sunday, February 08, 2015

Photograph - Andrew Taylor, Esquire


Forty seven years ago Rosemary Healey married Jorge Alejandro Waterhouse-Hayward in a civil ceremony in Coyoacán, Mexico. We had attempted to marry at least six times but the judges told us they had no permission to marry two foreigners. Finally I got the message and contacted the judge in Coyoacán and presented him with a bottle of expensive cognac.
We could, we did and we regretted it - certainly not our decision to marry 47 years ago. We regretted today my suggestion that we should belay our daily morning ritual (now in effect for about 15 years) of breakfast in bed with our NY Times and the Vancouver Sun. I told Rosemary that we might celebrate by going to the buffet breakfast at the River Rock Casino in Richmond.

We drove to Oakridge and parked. We walked to the Skytrain and got off at Brighouse Station. We faced a long lineup. We finally made it. We were taken to a table with a view of Fraser River, a cement factory and ugly barges. This view in spite of it all must be one of the ugliest in town. Somehow the cement towers hide the mountains. Over the din of the talking we could hear some heavy drumming (not Japanese drumming but close) – no soothing music.
Until we left we watched many a person of extreme girth pass us by with a smile on his/her face with a plate piled with psychedelic red lobster. A couple of extremely large Lebanese Christian men had multiple trips to the lobster counter.

The man who makes omelets told me that on good days (I have no idea what he meant by good) he made over 500 of them between 6am and 2pm plus he used up 25 liters of waffle mix. The omelet was good. Nothing else was. The bacon was limp the sausages were tasteless and the desserts were mostly the ones you might find at an oriental bakery. The roast beef was par-boiled.

There are no waiters. Those who work there are bussers who must remove from each table countless plates half-filled with food. We wondered in what level Dante might have put the kitchen which I would imagine would be hell on earth.

It would seem to me that Las Vegas could teach the River Rock a few lessons on how to properly serve a buffet.

Watching all those people gobbling up their food I began to almost understand the fact that my Rosemary has hidden her eating disorder for so many years. Before we came to Vancouver I was ignorant to my dyslexia and in the family we all said Rosemary ate like a little bird. It has been the reality of living in Vancouver that has clued us in to all sorts of syndromes we had no idea existed.

Tomorrow morning we will resume our breakfast-in-bed routine. After so many years I still recognize how romantic and comforting it is and that the word routine, in this case is not the appropriate one.



     

Previous Posts
Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín

From Simple To Complex

Leaning Towards Irrelevancy

Nevertheless She Persisted - For Allan Morgan - My...

El Reloj de Arena - The Hour Glass - Jorge Luís Bo...

An Officer and a Gentleman & An Anniversary

el ayelmado tripolio que ademenos es de satén rosa...

For Susanne Tabata's Media Class At the Art Instit...

Linda Melsted - The Music in the Violin does not e...



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7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17