A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Blue
Saturday, June 03, 2017




Blue is the colour between violet and green on the optical spectrum of visible light. Human eyes perceive blue when observing light with a wavelength between 450 and 495 nanometres, which is between 4500 and 4950 ångströms. Blues with a higher frequency and thus a shorter wavelength gradually look more violet, while those with a lower frequency and a longer wavelength gradually appear more green. Pure blue, in the middle, has a wavelength of 470 nanometers (4700 ångströms). In painting and traditional colour theory, blue is one of the three primary colours of pigments, along with red and yellow, which can be mixed to form a wide gamut of colours. Red and blue mixed together form violet, blue and yellow together form green. Blue is also a primary colour in the RGB colour model, used to create all the colours on the screen of a television or computer monitor.

The modern English word blue comes from Middle English bleu or blewe, from the Old French bleu, a word of Germanic origin related to Old Dutch, Old High German, Old Saxon blāo and Old Frisian blāw, blau. The clear sky and the deep sea appear blue because of an optical effect known as Rayleigh scattering. When sunlight passes through the atmosphere, the blue wavelengths are scattered more widely by the oxygen and nitrogen molecules, and more blue comes to our eyes. An optical effect called Tyndall scattering, similar to Rayleigh scattering, explains blue eyes; there is no blue pigment in blue eyes. Distant objects appear more blue because of another optical effect called atmospheric perspective.

Blue has been used for art and decoration since ancient times. The semi-precious stone lapis lazuli, coming from mines in Afghanistan, was used in ancient Egypt for jewelry and ornament and later, in The Renaissance, to make the pigment ultramarine, the most expensive of all pigments. It is the most important color in Judaism. In the Middle Ages, cobalt blue was used to colour the stained glass windows of cathedrals. Beginning in the 9th century, Chinese artists used cobalt to make fine blue and white porcelain. Blue dyes for clothing were made from woad [a flower] in Europe and indigo in Asia and Africa. In 1828 a synthetic ultramarine pigment was developed, and synthetic blue dyes and pigments gradually replaced mineral pigments and vegetable dyes. Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Vincent van Gogh and other late 19th century painters used ultramarine and cobalt blue not just to depict nature, but to create moods and emotions. In the late 18th century and 19th century, blue became a popular colour for military uniforms and police uniforms. In the 20th century, because blue was commonly associated with harmony, it was chosen as the colour of the flags of the United Nations and the European Union. Toward the end of the 20th century, dark blue replaced dark grey as the most common colour for business suits; surveys showed that blue was the colour most associated with the masculine, just ahead of black, and was also the colour most associated with intelligence, knowledge, calm and concentration.


Surveys in the US and Europe show that blue is the colour most commonly associated with harmony, faithfulness, confidence, distance, infinity, the imagination, cold, and sometimes with sadness. In US and European public opinion polls it is the most popular colour, chosen by almost half of both men and women as their favourite colour.
Wikipedia 

Curiously my image was taken with Kodak b+w Infrared film. I scan the negative in RGB colour in my scanner and I make the colour by mixing blue with cyan.

Red




The Vermilion Psychiatric Couch
Friday, June 02, 2017





Until about 10 years ago, already into this century I had to let go of my very nice studio in downtown Vancouver. It suffered from that perennial  “leaky tank” problem. With the decline of magazines, newspapers my editorial work had diminished to the point that money coming into the studio was not exceeding the money going out.

I closed it and got rid of lots of stuff I had amassed in the many years I had been there. There were big piles of telephone books that I used to make the photographs of short and tall lawyers look more uniform. There were all kinds of reflectors and their opposites big black ones. But my real sad quandary was the psychiatric couch.

Some years before I had been taking photographs of a lovely woman undraped and she told me, “If you are going to do more of this you need to find a loveseat or a sofa where we can lie on. I went downstairs and bought a newspaper. There was an ad that I believe read something like this:
Retiring psychiatrist is selling psychiatric couch for $100 -will deliver for $25.
I was the proud owner of a real psychiatric couch. It was heavy and it had a faded and worn out spot were the doctor’s patients rested their head. For the many (and there were many) photographs that I took with the couch I always had to drape a bed sheet, black satin or whatever to cover the faded spot.



How was I going to deal with this couch now? My son-in-law who had an old Toyota liftback told me the couch would fit in his car. We manhandled the unit into his car and brought it to our house on Athlone. It fit just right in the living room. I photographed my granddaughters on it and it served us well for some of our family Christmas portraits.

When we moved to our present location in Kitsilano here in Vancouver I knew exactly what I was going to do. I had the folks at Cook’s Upholstery take it away and I chose a beautiful vermilion. It is now in our piano room next to our 100 year-old Chickering baby grand which has a piano stool covered in the same material.  




Nena's Legs
Thursday, June 01, 2017


Nena

Quite a few years ago I was determined to become a full Argentine by learning to dance the tango. In the end I did learn but I would define my skill as simply efficient. There were some bonuses as I met some lovely women who wore slit skirts to show off their equally lovely legs. One of them was Nena.

When Nena was a little girl her father gave her some toys and dolls that were stuffed in one fishnet stocking. It seems that Nena threw the contents away and kept the single stocking. She has loved fishnets and sheer stockings since.

About ten years ago I was driving down 6th Avenue in Vancouver when I almost crashed the car. I saw a woman from behind walking. She had fishnets and there was no doubt in my mind that it was Nena.



The Story Behind Our Rosa ‘Königin von Dänemark'
Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Rosa ‘Königin von Dänemark' - May 29 2017 scan from our garden


Below you will find a shortened version of where some roses came from, and how at long last I found which queen of Denmark is my Rosa ‘Königin von Dänemark', who bred it, and how this lovely rose thrived by being transplanted from our old Kerrisdale garden on Athlone Street into our little Kitsilano deck garden.

In our large garden in Kerrisdale on Athlone Street I amassed 85 roses beginning sometime at the end of the 80s. I had a preference for storied old roses and David Austin English Roses because these roses have intense fragrance.

Most old roses are not remontant which means they bloom only once in early summer. In the 19th century a class of roses was developed called Hybrid Perpetuals (not in the least perpetual!) that bloomed once and then sparingly in the fall. It seems that roses coming from China had the ability to be remontant. One of these remontant roses was not from China but from the Middle East that history tells us may have come back to Europe during the crusades. This rose was from a class called Damask and the rose that bloomed more than once had the fanciful name of Rosa ‘Quatre Saisons’. I had that rose for a few years in the mid 90s until it simply died in a specially cold early spring.

In our Athlone garden I had increasing shade by big conifers on a neighbour’s garden. Some of my roses began to look unhappy and a few became diseased with botrytis cinerea. The symptom was that the bloom would fall off before opening. The disease hit four of my roses. Two were Albas which are hybrids whose antiquity may go back further than the Roman Empire. Pliny, who lived from 23-79 A.D., mentioned white roses in his Natural History. Botanists believe these roses may have been Albas. These roses are usually white and their leaves are grayish. They almost never get other well know afflictions like black spot.

Botrytis affecting Rosa 'Reine des Violettes' (purple) & Rosa 'Maiden's Blush', pink Scan from my garden

My Albas were Rosa ‘Maiden’s Blush’ and Rosa ‘Königin von Dänemark'. A third was Rosa ‘Belle Isis’ a Gallica which like all Gallicas are native to southern and central Europe. The fourth was Rosa ‘Reine des Violettes’ a Hybrid Perpetual.

Rosa ‘Königin von Dänemark'  July 17 2007 proliferated bloom but still beautiful

The above scan shows a not too frequent rose malady called rose proliferation.

I tried spraying with copper sulphate and sulphur but nothing worked. Reine des Violettes died a few years ago and Belle Isis did not emerge with new growth this spring in our Kitsilano garden.

But, (yes but!) ‘Maiden’s Blush and ‘Königin von Dänemark'’are both healthy. Maiden’s Blush as I write has yet to bloom but the other is glorious. My only guess is that transplanting them to a different place with different soil did the trick.

Alba Roses are hybrids whose antiquity may go back further than the Roman Empire. Pliny, who lived from 23-79 A.D., mentioned white roses in his Natural History. Botanists believe these roses may have been Albas.

Rosa ‘Königin von Dänemark' - May 30 2017 scan from our garden

From a website on Early Rose Breeding in Germany  I found this:

The Englishman James Booth was to emerge in a formerly part of Denmark but now in Germany with a rose of ‘German origin’.

James Booth – a landscape gardener from Scotland – was invited about 1795 by   Baron von Vogt of – at that time – Denmark, to create an ornamented farm, following the English example. Flottbeck, or as it is written today ‘Flottbek’, now a suburb of Hamburg/Germany, had fallen to Denmark by succession. Rich businessmen and ship owners, having their trade in Hamburg built their estates and residences in Flottbek at that time. Several others followed von Vogt’s example and more ornamented farms were built. To meet the growing interests in trees and shrubs, tree nurseries were established in the vicinity of these ornamented farms, where climatic and soil conditions were optimal for nurseries. This, and the prospect to get a job there, led an ex-sailor to move on with this family from Lower Saxony to this place. One of the descendants of this ex-sailor should be the founder of one of today’s leading rose nurseries worldwide: Wilhelm Kordes.

Alongside his landscape gardening, which lasted for about 10 years, in 1798  Booth built up his own tree and shrub nursery in Flottbek, where he finally started his rose breeding attempt.

The ‘Bleu Rougâtre de Flottbeck’, described by Bosse as “bright red with violet fluorescence,” is probably the only cultivar James Booth ever bred. He died in 1814 and was succeeded by his sons.

In 1826 James Booth Sons released the Alba ‚’Königin von Dänemark’, a seedling of the Alba ‘Maidens Blush’ and an unknown rose. It would be their only release. This ‘Königin von Dänemark’ sparked what was called “Der Rosenkrieg“ [‘rose war’] between James Booth`s sons, [‘James Booth Söhne’] and Johann Georg Christian Lehmann, the first director of the Botanical Institute in Hamburg and author of more than half a dozen botanical books of scientific rank. Lehmann accused Booth Sons of selling the known rose cultivar ‚La Belle Courtisane’ under a new name, and of not having bred a new cultivar at all.[22] This “war” took place in the great newspapers of that time, occupying most of the energy of the two opponents. In the end, Prof. Lehmann could not prove his accusations, but the reputation of both opponents had sustained major damage.

Booth Sons, very successful as owners of the tree nursery, did not engage any more in rose breeding. The nursery closed forever in 1886, liquidated by the next generation, without having contributed any more to the rose world.

Here is the information of that Queen of Denmark Marie of Hess-Kassel!  All of the roses featured in the scans here are not remontant. The argument that some rosarians make (include me!) is that nobody expects cherry trees or rhododendrons to bloom more than once. What these Albas, Hybrid Perpetuals and Gallicas have in common is that all have outstanding perfume. That’s why I love old roses.


Marie of Hesse-Kassel by Jens Juel - 1790




Bertram Brooker - A Wonderful Discovery
Tuesday, May 30, 2017


Bertram Brooker - Figures in a Landscape 1931


Rosemary and I are hard-copy newspaper fans. That may be because at over 70 (both of us) we cannot budge from our old ways. We faithfully read our daily delivered NY Times every day of the week and the Vancouver Sun 6 days of the week. 

Every once in a while the Vancouver Sun delivers in spades (via An Edition of NP in the Vancouver Sun – they call it).

Wednesday’s May 31st edition has a most interesting article entitled The Forgotten Nudes of Canada. It is here. In this article I have discovered a wonderful Canadian artist called Bertram Brooker (1888- 1955). I wonder how else I might have found him.

The article is about the fact that Canadian art has always seem to have been about the Canadian landscape. It is most interesting to note the title of Brooker’s work – Figures in Landscape.

I have scoured my extensive files of nudes and have found few that would match the above work. My close shot nudes are never in landscape. And my landscape nudes are much like this one that I took in LIghthouse Park in West Vancouver.








My Estellas & the Death of Romance
Monday, May 29, 2017


Cornelia sitting on floor left, her mother Jeanette siting behind her.



This theme has been in my head since I received a Facebook Messenger response from Cornelia a few weeks ago.

At age 74 almost 75 my romantic past (and by this I mean romance since I can remember it) has flickered past like a silent movie.

I guess it all began when I was around 8 and my parents took me to the Buenos Aires suburb of Anchorena. There I met a lovely little girl, serious and remote called Ysabel Opisso. All I can remember of her was that remoteness. She became my first Estella. It was in subsequent years but still in Buenos Aires when we read Great Expectations that the name Estella became part of my distant relationship with girls and women I admired.

It was Cornelia in Nueva Rosita, Coahuila who became a memorable Estell of mine in the back seat of a Buick Roadmaster sometime around 1958. I was in the back seat with her. Her mother Jeanette was driving to the US trough Eagle Pass, Texas to take her to a school in Uvalde. I was then to be driven to the San Antonio Greyhound bus station to take my Scenicruiser to Austin and to my boarding school St. Edward’s High School.

I remember absolutely nothing of anything we might have said in that back seat. She was as patrician as her mother (who was my mother’s best friend in her isolation in Nueva Rosita where she taught a few children (and me) whose parents worked at the American Smelting & Refining Company.
But I remember that she was an Estella and I had never forgotten her.

In the beginning of this century I was able to find her mother who was living in Eagle Pass and we had long conversations on early Skype. She told me that Cornelia had married a gentleman from those parts and now also lived in Eagle Pass.

Cornelia finally answered and was elated. But romances of the past are doomed to a stifling unease from the other party when they note my approach which seems strange to them.

I cannot explain (without further scaring these Estellas and my other former girlfriends) that for me love or some form of it may fade a tad in the present but the memory of it in the past is always there.
I never let go of any women in my life except one. She was as old flame who was going to travel to see me during the 1968 Mexican Olympics. I had to reveal to her that I had just married my Rosemary.

What I want to assert here is that I love in some way all those women from my past.

This romantic balloon can burst particularly as I have imposed a rosy permanence that cannot withstand the progress of time.

Take for example my teenage flame from Austin. She was a cute very short cheerleader. I had two dates with her after agonizing a fear of an Estella rejection.

In 2011 I found her in business ( she owned a cheerleading supply company) in San Antonio. After my initial attempts of communication with her she must have found me to be strange. And that was it.
Until a couple of months ago when she requested to be my friend in Facebook. Wow was I excited at reliving that rose past. But no. It has been a steady disappointment for me as her postings were either about watching San Antonio Spurs games or postings of the altar of the church she attends on Sundays. Religion and basketball – that to me has ended somewhat (but not completely) whatever romance I had.

My next step, without unfriending her is to block her posts.

The death of romance it is.



     

Previous Posts
A Rose in Decline & Memories Past

The Last Rose of Summer Revisited

The Last Rose of Summer

The Messiah - A Roasted Chestnut to Perfection

Bowering, Baseball & Burlesque

L'Orfeo & Two 6ft 2in Theorbos

Resonance

Stylus Fantasticus & The Gambist

The White House Novels

Zorro Sent Me



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10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17

10/1/17 - 10/8/17

10/8/17 - 10/15/17

10/15/17 - 10/22/17

10/22/17 - 10/29/17

10/29/17 - 11/5/17

11/5/17 - 11/12/17

11/12/17 - 11/19/17