A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Two (almost) Crazy Women
Saturday, August 19, 2017


Dorothea (Dory) Hayley


I became aware that actors can act (something that is not always self-evident when I had the pleasure of taking portraits of British actress (I am old fashioned) Juliet Stevenson in 1990 when she came to Vancouver to promote her film Truly Madly Deeply. I asked her to look into my lens and to express three different emotions that I would click, rapidly, one at a time.

In my longish life as a portrait photographer I have only photographed two women who bordered on the insane. They only acted the part. They were opera singers. One was Elizabeth Futral who posed for me as Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor and the other was Dorothea Haley who played the part for my camera of the jilted 19th century Australian Miss Donnithorne for Sir Peter Maxwell Davies’ Miss Donnithorne's Maggot. 

Elizabeth Futral


Both played the part to perfection to my camera.

If you have no idea who Miss Eliza Emily Donnithorne is (the opera is brand new) you might want to know that it is almost certain that she was the inspiration for Charles Dickens’ Miss Havisham in his Great Expectations.

Opera singers can act and more so now that operas are often filmed with closeups. Opera singers who sing in operas that are not staged (called concert operas) as is the case for Dorothea (Dory) Haley’s performance tomorrow Sunday at 7pm at the Mount Seymour United Church, more info here, have to especially act. There are no sets to put viewer/listeners into the mood. 


Juliet Stevenson


I have been told by Haley (whom I photographed on Thursday in my little studio) that she has a most elaborate costume for the part. And another one, too, as she is also singing another jilted woman part Haydn’s Arianna a Naxos.



Crazy Over Love
Friday, August 18, 2017





  Guest Blog by Soprano Dory Hayley

Joy in Abandonment
Dory Hayley
Artistic Co-Director, Blueridge Chamber Music Festival

The third concert of the Blueridge Chamber Music Festival features two classic stories of abandonment and betrayal. We started out with Peter Maxwell Davies’ deliciously creepy chamber opera, Miss Donnithorne’s Maggot, which I had been dying for years to sing. Rather than rounding out the program with instrumental works, Alejandro Ochoa and I decided to pair it with Haydn’s Arianna a Naxos because of their similar thematic material. We commissioned costumes from the inimitable Diane Park and made the concert the central “catastrophic event” of our “Red Wedding” themed 2017 season.

When I got around to learning the music several months later, though, I thought to myself, oh dear: this program is a bit problematic from a feminist perspective….

Haydn’s scene tells the story of Ariadne, who is left in charge of her father Minos’ impenetrable labyrinth. When Theseus comes to slay the Minotaur of the labyrinth, Ariadne falls in love with him, and helps him navigate the maze with a ball of string. They escape together by sea. But in Haydn’s piece, Ariadne awakes on the island of Naxos to find that Theseus has abandoned her and sailed away. 

Sir Peter Maxwell Davies’ chamber opera tells the story of a real woman who lived in Australia in the mid-19th century and became a model for Dickens’ Miss Havisham. Miss Donnithorne is engaged to be married to a naval officer, but he disappears on the day of the wedding. She is so distraught that she lives for the rest of her life indoors, in her wedding dress, with the mouldering wedding cake laid out on the table.

At first glance, these are two portraits of powerless victims, their lives rendered meaningless by the loss of their male partners. But as I delved deeper into the scores, I realized that both women react to a traumatic loss with remarkable strength.

Ariadne never really loses composure in the face of abandonment. Her noble, measured music remains solidly in the middle register of the voice throughout. Both her arias are in major keys, and even the heated final allegro ends with an optimistic major cadence. Perhaps this hints at the fact that Ariadne does not mourn the loss of Theseus for long. She ends up marrying Dionysus and having eleven children, and her wedding crown becomes the constellation Corona Borealis.

Miss Donnithorne, on the other hand, doesn’t move on, ever. She commits herself 100% to her life of abandonment. Her lover himself has become nothing more than an object…what really interests her is the atmosphere of suspension in time, and the symbols of her fixation: the moon, the sea, and especially the wedding cake. For me, the key to the opera is a line near the end: “I did not think that love might last so long.”

Through her dogged commitment to madness and solitude she has turned a flimsy youthful affection into a powerful and devoted act of performance art. Miss Donnithorne bears her fate with anger and petulance, but also with rigour and zeal. She’s ruining her own life and relishing every moment of it. It’s incredible fun to play this character, because you don’t have to feel sorry for her. You just ride her wave of joy in her own destruction.




La Tormenta de Santa Rosa
Thursday, August 17, 2017

Rosa 'Sombreul' August 17 2017



As my birthday on August 31 approaches I become melancholy. Today while driving our brand new Chevrolet Cruze I told Rosemary, “I have no idea how many years we had our Malibu (which gave up the ghost on December 23 2016) but if we keep this car for five years I will be 80. Will I be driving at that age if I am alive?” Rosemary chose to remain silent.

Every approaching birthday always take me back to the first ones that I remember in my Buenos Aires. We lived in a house with a very long but narrow garden. My mother would draw a donkey (to put the tail on it) and hang a piñata. My uncle Tony would come to take the photograph (which is one of the few instances where I can see my father in a photograph). Sometimes my birthday party (and I have hated cake since then) had to be postponed. August 30 is the anniversary of Santa Rosa de Lima. On her day or near it there was usually a terrific storm called “La Tormenta de Santa Rosa”


Alex - top; fifth from left with cone hat
.

All those smiling children in the photographs are now gone, dead or disappeared. My birthday no longer has that relevance.

In Vancouver August 31 brings the winds of fall and our garden goes into a slow decline. The roses are far and in between.

But there is beauty in the garden in the realization that all things die but that they, and us, have a will to keep on while they and we can.

My father at top, Alex centre bottom with the smirk

Who knows at age 80 I may be driving the Cruze. My friend Barbara Cook (New Zealand born) is 92 and drives a van. She has an honest-to-good driver’s licence.



Two With Poise & Elegance
Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Katarina Nesic & Zander Constant


In December 1995 I photographed Evelyn Hart and dance was never the same for me. Before that I was ignorant of the art form. Since then my ignorance has dissipated a tad. I have also witnesses lots of dance.  While I may not be a dance critic or have proper training I have seen enough dancers to know which are the good ones.

My appreciation for dance had an early beginning in a way in something not quite related to dance. When I was in my late teens in Mexico City I enjoyed going to watch frontón (jai-alai) at the Frontón México. There were some players of this ultra fast game who the fans called fenómenos. In Spanish it sort of means someone who has a talent that is beyond what we know of talent. Could it be the devil himself who is involved?

The same word was shouted in the bullring of Plaza México. I was a fan of  bullfighting. Any Spaniard or Mexican interested in el “arte taurino” will tell you (in spite of the fact that North Americans consider it a sport, a terribly cruel sport) that the exceptional bullfighter dances with grace while faced with danger.

Bullfighters such as Malonete were called fenómenos.

What do bullfighters and jai-alai players have to do with dancers, be they ballet, modern or other types of dancing?

I believe that you can find easily good dancers who have precise skills. But this is not enough. You have to have something that I call presence. As an example Marlon Brando in a tight T-shirt was an actor with presence.

When I watch dancers in Vancouver I look for this skill/presence. I like to look for it among the young dancers of the Arts Umbrella Dance Company. Every couple of years I take note of one or two that makes my grade (even though it is my amateur grade!).

The two you see here, Zander Constant and Katarina Nesic are dancers I have watched grow up through the years as my granddaughter Lauren, 16, has been dancing at Arts Umbrella for 8 years.

Of Nesic I can only say that she dances exquisitely with a grace that stands out above her peers. Part of her presence is the fact that she is blonde but has what must be almost jet-black eyes. If she happens to look at you it is Superman using X-rays.

Zander normally wears glasses. If you notice him in a line-up outside the Vancouver Playhouse you might suspect he is an ungainly teenager at loss. But if you see him dance, as I have through the years, and without glasses he is a Clark Kent suddenly becoming a Superman to match his friend Nesic!

Nesic still has a year to go at Arts Umbrella. Constant has graduated from the program and the smart powers-that-be at Ballet BC have selected him to be in the company as an apprentice.

The two showed up at my house on Wednesday and we sat for a bit to eat. Talking to these two (she is 18, he is 19) is very much like talking to polite, informed, enthusiastic adults.

It was not too long ago that Arts Umbrella Artistic Director, Artemis Gordon told me that the dance program of her school (that in my opinion is a dance company) cleared (some) of the streets of would be delinquents! I believe her.

By the time dance students reach that age of about 16 they have a schedule of dance that is so long and busy that they must attend one of two schools that offer a special program that clears the afternoon for dance rehearsals. One is Magee Secondary and the other is King Edward Secondary. They begin early in the morning and skip physical education. A bus takes them to Granville Island or the other location on 7th Avenue at Quebec for the remainder of the day.

The result of this intense program is an individual with poise, grace, manners and a self-assuredness that is almost scary. And these individuals when they graduate go to dance in the best dance companies in Europe and beyond.

Constant and Nesic posed for me together. Then I asked Nesic (who does not need to wear any makeup) to apply makeup to Constant and particularly under the eyes.

It was so much fun to watch this and taking their photographs was easy. Why?

Because they are dancers. And they are fenómenos.



Guillermina Santa Bárbara Cheers Me Up
Monday, August 14, 2017






On December 24, 1964 my ship the Argentine Merchant Marine Río Aguapey docked in New Orleans. I was the only passenger and I was being sent back home to Veracruz after two years of service in the Argentine Navy.

With no family or friends (my shipboard young officer friends were all quite drunk by the evening) I decided I was going to explore Bourbon Street. I passed several noisy jazz bars playing Dixieland (not one of my favourite moments of jazz) and headed to a strip bar. I had never seen a stripper or a burlesque dancer take her clothes off.

Since I was an unoriginal idiot I purchased a bourbon (what else?) and sat down to watch. The first dancer showed up on stage and connected a jukebox. Then she made the motions much like a robot of taking her clothes off with no expression on her face. Perhaps the only good thing going for her was that she was not chewing gum. 

As the evening progressed (I nursed the one drink) I became more and more melancholy.  A young woman approached me and sat down. She told me her name was Guillermina  Santa Bárbara. She said she was from Puerto Rico. She had noticed my sad face and wanted to cheer me up. We talked in Spanish (natch!) and I felt better. Perhaps my Nochebuena was not completely ruined. I have to this day no idea if she simply was a good soul or was after my money. I was penniless. But she gave me a 8x10 glossy.

I went back to the Río Aguapey. It was dark and silent. I went to the bridge to find Captain Guillermo Migliorini drinking coffee. He was a kind man and asked me how my venture to the city had been. I told him that I had met a woman who was his namesake. We both smiled at the coincidence.

And I went to bed.



Mona Lisa - Overdrive
Sunday, August 13, 2017


Bronwen - Mona Lisa

She was waiting in the car and she didn’t like it. She didn’t like waiting anyway, but the wiz she’d done made it really hard. She had to remind herself not to grit her teeth, because whatever Gerald had done to them, they were still sore. She was sore all over, now she thought about it. Probably the wiz hadn’t been such a great idea.
Mona Lisa Overdrive – William Gibson

The name of the dense lump of cybernetic hardware that Bobby Newmark's consciousness is jacked into is a direct reference to the short story "The Aleph" by Argentinian author Jorge Luis Borges. The titular Aleph is a point in space which contains all other points, and if one were to gaze into the Aleph one would be able to see or experience the entirety of existence.
Mona Lisa Overdrive – Wikipedia

El Aleph – The Face of Beatriz

With no work and more time, there is ample opportunity to be a thinking human. And because I am a thinking human I tend to associate one thing with another that not might have any obvious connection. For more of that, look up who Bunny Watson is. Bunny Watson has been my inspiration since I began this blog back in January 2006.

The scanned Fuji FP-3000B Instant Film peel (what you get when you peel the print off) and now sadly discontinued I put away in my memory after I filed it.

Today I thought about it. I looked for it and then I made the connection of what in the picture was familiar to me. I would call this some sort of contemporary Mona Lisa. I photographed Bronwen (my Mona Lisa) in my former Chevrolet Malibu which was in our garage.

She is in a car which immediately in my imagination took me to William Gibson’s final novel of the cyberpunk sprawl trilogy (Neuromancer, Count Zero) Mona Lisa Overdrive.

It didn’t take long to find a paragraph of one of Gibson’s protagonists named Mona in a car. A further connection is that Gibson's novel is somewhat influenced by Jorge Luís Borges' El Aleph who is my favourite Argentine author.





     

Previous Posts
Inertia

Beyond the Grave - A Posthumous Gift

Pathos With Kokoro at the Roundhouse

That Female Angel

Pete Turner & Khalistan

Figurative Art - An Obsession

Embryotrophic Cavatina - Requiem For My Friend

The Man From Pittsburg Almost Made Me Smile

Giclée in French Slang means...

Fairwell French Style - Not



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8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17