A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

How Orange is Trump?
Saturday, January 07, 2017








Donald J. Trump officially announced his campaign for the presidency at Trump Tower in Manhattan on June 16, 2015, with his daughter Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, at his side. Credit Todd Heisler/The New York Times
In this article in my NY Times today (the on-line version as I also get a daily delivered hard copy at the front door here in Vancouver, BC) I noticed a photograph taken by Todd Heisler for the NY Times. The article is by Susanne Craig, Jo Becker & Jesse Drucker.

How we perceive colour affects us even if we do not know it is happening. Photographers, artists and media savvy folks know better.

Here in Canada I noticed that the liberal media newspapers (I am a left wing liberal if you must know!) would make our former Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s photographs that appeared in newspapers to be a tad green/cyan. Ugh!

As humans, whose spectrum of colour is decidedly on the red, orange and yellow side (and the reason we get into arguments about blue, green and turquoise and cannot see ultra-violet) we are affected by colour. We see these more visible (the reason fire trucks are red) colours as warm and the others as cool. A green face will never be an attractive one (ask Kermit who will disagree). So if we make a politician’s face in a cool colour we will instantly not like him (her) or at the very least be turned off or not trust.

Much has been written about Trump’s orange face. Perhaps it is a tad. My guess is that Jared Kushner’s shirt is white. I cannot make the same conclusion for Ivanka Trump’s dress. It could be white or even cream.

My correction for colour
  
The photographer obviously did not use a flash and simply shot for existing light. The above pot lights are not balanced for daylight so the camera saw the light as yellowish/red. Either he did not bother to balance the colour correctly (or at least make an attempt with his digital camera's automatic white balance) or the NY Times photo editor did not either, or did not mind.

While I am not a partisan of Trump the man or his policies I do believe that this photograph affects how we perceive the man without us knowing that.

And a further tweak on my part

 I do not believe in most conspiracies and this is certainly not one. It is just an example of shoddy photojournalism. That my own NY Times is at it too, is embarrassing.

There is a perhaps an apocryphal story here in Vancouver of a wedding photographer who left his rolls of colour negative film at a lab for processing. He did not tell the lab that the bride was wearing a light pink dress. You can imagine the human colour printer attempting to make decent proofs.



Buenaventura Gálvez Puig
Friday, January 06, 2017



Buenaventura Gálvez Puig - Photograph Hiroshi Suyama - Manila

When we are young (or at least when I was young) we are not curious enough to ask questions that depend on people being alive. I can only write in this blog today something that is a combination of what I remember and some guesswork that is purely speculative. Anybody who could clue me in is dead.

What I know about my mother’s pianist aunt Buenaventura Gálvez Puig is that she often combed my mother’s long hair when my mother was a little girl. My mother found the experience excruciating and would complain. Her aunt Buenaventura would then tell her in Castillian Spanish, “Para ser una dama hay que saber sufrir.” translates to, “To be a gentlewoman one must learn to suffer.”
I never asked my mother why it was that she (my mother) played the piano and played it so well. Perhaps her aunt, who was a concert pianist and teacher in Manila at the turn of the century, inspired her.



From Buenaventura my mother Filomena inherited a lot of her sheet music and bound books including a three-volume complete Beethoven Piano Sonatas. Here I have scanned a little book that my mother called a Mozart Mignon as it is about the size of a large pocket book. Buenaventura’s signature has faded with the years.

In our family photo album we have a photograph of Buenaventura as a young woman. It seems she was very beautiful. On the back of the photograph it reads Hiroshi Suyama Photographers. At that turn of the century many of the best Manila photographers were Japanese so this is no surprise.

I just wish I had asked more questions. Buenaventura Galvez (my grandmother Lolita’s mother’s surname) must have married a man from Catalonia as Puig (pronounced pootch) is such a name.





Bring Back, Oh! Bring Back That Ektachrome To Me!
Thursday, January 05, 2017

Sandrine Cassini - Ektachrome EPN

It has been announced that the moribund or perhaps dead Great Yellow Father from Rochester is bringing back Ektachrome this year.


At age 74 I am old enough to remember that in National Geographics of yore the photographs contained information that included that they were taken with   Ektachrome (or Kodachrome).
In the heyday of magazines when the tons of money they had were splurged on good photography, unique photography, photography with style, there were no scanners or digital reproduction. The only way magazine or advertising art directors could respect the vision of the individual photographer was to inspect the original. More often than not that had to be a slide or a transparency (a term sometimes uses to describe slides larger than 35mm).

Underexposed or overexposed slides were anathema to these art directors. There was nothing that could really be done to correct exposure errors as this was before Photoshop. My 13 year-old Photoshop’s most useful tool is the one that I use when I scan those Ektachromes (and b+w and colour negatives). The tool is called Shadow/Highlight. This tool can draw out all that detail that was always in the shadows of properly exposed Ektachrome. In that past the internegatives that were used to print slides or Cibachrome (it had much too much contrast and shadow detail tended to disappear) could not properly bring out all the rich detail of those Ektachromes and Kodachromes.



This photographer had a fear of overexposure that was so profound that my slides tended to be a bit on the dark side. My then friend and Vancouver Magazine Editor Malcolm Parry gave me the nickname of Halfstop because when he noted my dark slides I always explained that I had taken one shot per my exposure meter and one more half a stop under.

The only photographer that I knew that specialized in underexposure was a well-known American called Pete Turner whose trick for getting “electrically saturated” slides was to consciously underexpose Kodachrome. But then he worked for the best magazines around and they must have had tricks up their sleeves to cope with Turner’s super-saturated output.

For all the years that I shot for magazines I only used slide or transparency film. I looked down upon anybody who used colour negative. It was my feeling (not completely off the mark) that these photographers had shoddy exposure methods and used colour negative’s ability to compensate for exposure error (called film latitude and colour negative has always had high film latitude). But sometime in the 90s I read a National Geographic article about shooting in the Antarctic that mentioned that the photographer took an extra camera (a Nikon FM-2) loaded with colour negative film. The shoots were so important that no chances could be taken. It was then that I began to not look down on photographers who did not shoot slide film.

The reason for that is that slide film in comparison has less latitude for exposure error that negative film). It means you have to be bang on with your exposures and in my time I had to have a very good exposure/flash meter. In fact I had two of them just in case.

Now with digital cameras there is no need for Ektachrome or slide film if you are shooting for magazines. My film scanner can deal excellently with the very good Kodak (and Fuji) colour negative film that is even made in the 120 format for my Mamiya RB-67.

I have blown away many an audience at a photo or garden lecture projecting my 6x7 cm slides (in lovely Gepe glass slide mounts) with my  Linhof slide projector (very quiet) with Leitz lenses.
What I don’t understand is why Kodak is coming back with Ektachrome. Will our Vancouver The Lab (an excellent one) suddenly be pushed to process what used to be called E-6 film? What do people who will shoot this Ektachrome use it for? Will they project it? Will they print it?

Ektachrome slides came in various types. The picture you see here of Sandrine Cassini with a red rose was taken using Ektachrome EPN. It was rated at 100ISO and the N stood for neutral colour. And yet it was not in the least neutral. I was just less saturated than for example EPP Ektachrome.
Good (and wealthy photographers) would by large batches of Ektachrome manufactured on the same day in what was called the same batch. They would then shoot one roll to determine if the film had any colour shifts. Most did so these precise photographers would then use correction filters to make the colours as accurate as possible.

In all the years that I shot Ektachrome the gray wall in my studio never photographed as gray. It always had a coolish cast to it, a mix of green, blue and cyan.
I believe that good digital cameras can now make gray walls (and gray seamless) gray while making skin tone accurate as possible.

But then there have always been exterior factors that many photographers do not understand. Light becomes warmer (in the direction of yellow and red) as you get closer to the Equator. And this light becomes bluer as you move towards the opposite directions. Snow in Whistler will be seen by film, videotape and by digital cameras as blue and even bluer at higher altitudes.
If this Ektachrome will be brought back in the professional form then photo shops will have to bring film fridges back. The purpose of the fridges was to keep the film at the optimum factory specifications. Amateur Ektachrome had a built-in shelf life. But I would have never bought amateur Ektachrome in any tropical country! Heat affects colour film and especially slide film.


For shoots doing annual reports in the US I always traveled with plastic containers and ice designed for food. Exposed Ektachrome was especially subject to colour shifts (on the warm side) in heat.
Perhaps bringing back Ektachrome is like bringing back LPs. Few who might want to now buy an expensive turntable and cartridge would have ever bought records when they were massed-produced. I had records that had built-in scratches and noises. Ektachrome will simply be another way of looking back at was considered a simpler, safer and less complicated life.

But users of Ektachrome beware. Most of those original automatic film cameras usually gave their owners good results not because the cameras were very good but because the colour negative film (and b+w, too) these cameras were loaded with had very wide latitude (forgiveness for exposure error). So these new photographers will have to shoot with very good hand-held exposure meters. If they don’t they might find that out of a 36 exposure roll 8 pictures or a bit more may be useable.
While I will keep using b&w film and home process it, Ektachrome will be for me a nostalgia  that I will not adopt.



 Looking at these two snaps that I took of cellist Rebecca Wenham last night with my Fuji XE-1 I have to stress that I do not miss Ektachrome at all. 




Rebecca Wenham - Cleopatra at the Cello
Wednesday, January 04, 2017

Rebecca Wenham - January 4, 2017 Fuji Colour Instant Film print


A frequent repeating theme in my blogs is that a photographer is much like one of those American gunfighters of the 19th century, stars of many Hollywood films. Any one of those gunfighters was as good as his last gunfight. We can guess the consequence if they were a tad slow or their eyes were not as sharp.

A photographer is as good as his (I’m a guy) last photograph. Those who are here can judge from these two Fuji Instant Film prints, and one reversed peel from one of them which I took today of Vancouver cellist Rebecca (Becky Wenham). I also shot colour negative film on my Mamiya RB-67 and with my Fuji X-E1. They will all be sharper than these. I still like the inherent look of this film which is sadly discontinued.

The easiest process for failure in a photographic session with a person is not to have some ideas on who to proceed. In my case I seem to have a long history of taking portraits of cellists including two male cellists. The problem with portraits of musicians is that someone has done before any pose you might think is original. In fact to photograph a musician involves copying a cliché and hiding (if that is possible in this 21st century) its provenance.


One of the really original portraits of a musician is thisone taken by Arnold Newman of Igor Stravinsky. Any other pianist portrait will be a cliché.

In the case of Becky Wenham I had two ideas that I had previously explored with American cellist Laura Kramer and of Seattle baroque cellist Juliana Soltis.

What is most interesting is that the Laura Kramer profile shot was instantly modified to perfection by Becky who simply raised her cello higher. To me it resembles a profile of an Egyptian queen possibly even Cleopatra.

Rebecca Wenham has many gigs. She plays for the VSO, for the Vancouver Opera Orchestra and (important to my interests) with Marc Destrube's Microcosmos Quartet. They have been known to play lots of those most difficult Bartok Quartets. We laughed in today's shoot citing the photographs with the ring flash (the second one here) as being Bartokish!

Fuji Instant Colour Negative scanned peel.





Fading Friendship
Tuesday, January 03, 2017


Felipe Occhiuzzi far left


I have written of friendship and the loss of it here  and here but it has been much in my thoughts of late. In that previous blog I quoted Harold Bloom from his book How To Read And Why:

"We read not only because we cannot know enough people, but because friendship is so vulnerable, so likely to diminish or disappear, overcome by space,time, imperfect sympathies, and all the sorrows of familial and passional life."

And there is this from Julian Barnes's nothing to be frightened of:

"I look around at my many friendships, and can recognize that some of them are not so much friendships any more as memories of friendship."



One of the first books I purchased when we moved from Mexico City to Vancouver was The Random House Dictionary of the English Language – The Unabridged Edition. In it I looked up the noun friend. Only in its 7th citiation is the word considered a transitive verb: Rare – to befriend.  Under friended it is an archaic adjective. From that I can safely surmise that the Facebook to friend and to unfriend are modern, more recent modifications of the erstwhile noun.

I have been thinking about friendship of late because many of my friends are dying or dead.
The word friend has a more direct connection with to love in Spanish as the word for is amigo and that is very close to amar or to love. Friendship is amistad and a non-regulation sports match is a partido amistoso. Te amo or I love you in Spanish is very dramatic. More often we use te quiero. It it not as prosaic as “I want you” but really means I love you dearly.

One of my dearest friend is Felipe Occhiuzzi. For close to two years he and I and three more of us served in the Argentine Navy seconded to the US Naval Advisor. Through the years in my visits to Argentina we have gotten together. We have stayed in touch.

Robert Hijar far right

Another friend I met earlier in 1962 when I went to the University of the American in Mexico City. Roberto Hijar was studying to get a masters in art. We both smoke pipes, listened to classical music and good jazz. We stayed in touch with letters and then with visits to his home in San Francisco and then in Memphis.

Both Felipe and Robert incorporated email and the internet into their lives. Both started sending me emails with links to stuff. The emails were addressed to many more than I and rarely did they come with an explanatory “Dear Alex these photographs reminded me of what you do and I thought…
These email links incensed me and I threatened to send Swedish pornography to all their recipients (and I may have in a couple of occasions). They never got the message so I gave up explaining and just deleted those emails.

Perhaps 10 years ago I called Robert in Memphis and told him we could get connected using Skype. He told me that I had called him at his cellular number and he was at his mother-in-law’s and she hated it when he used the phone in her presence. And then, off the cuff he said, “I do not need to communicate with you as I know all about you by reading your daily blog.” At that point I told him he was history – that we were history. Through the years he sends me greetings on Canadian Thanksgiving and that sort of thing. His emails are more sporadic now. Perhaps, as he is four years older than I am, he may be dead. I never reply.

I called Felipe in Buenos Aires when I visited in April 2016. I told him that I wanted to see him. He was only a bus route away from where I was staying. He called back to tell me he was not feeling well.  I have not heard from him since.

And that is how friendship fades into oblivion. The only route is to make new ones. That is something I am actively trying to do.





     

Previous Posts
Lee Lytton III & Friendly & Warm Ghosts

San Valentín

From Simple To Complex

Leaning Towards Irrelevancy

Nevertheless She Persisted - For Allan Morgan - My...

El Reloj de Arena - The Hour Glass - Jorge Luís Bo...

An Officer and a Gentleman & An Anniversary

el ayelmado tripolio que ademenos es de satén rosa...

For Susanne Tabata's Media Class At the Art Instit...

Linda Melsted - The Music in the Violin does not e...



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11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17