A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Sullenly & Silently Over The Fragments Of The House
Friday, October 17, 2014


From that chamber, and from that mansion, I fled aghast. The storm was still abroad in all its wrath as I found myself crossing the old causeway. Suddenly there shot along the path a wild light, and I turned to see whence a gleam so unusual could have issued; for the vast house and its shadows were alone behind me. The radiance was that of the full, setting, and blood-red-moon, which now shone vividly through that once barely- discernible fissure, of which I have before spoken as extending from the roof of the building, in a zigzag direction to the base. While I gazed, this fissure rapidly widened - there came a fierce breath of the whirlwind - the entire orb of the satellite burst at once upon my sight - there was a long tumultuous shouting sound like the voice of a thousand waters - and the deep and dank tarn at my feet closed sullenly and silently over the fragments of the "House of Usher."
Edgar Allan Poe - September 1839

Abies koreana and house in wait for the excavator

In a few days we will wake up (if we are asleep at 8 am) to the noise of a house in death throws. An excavator will run over a house around the block from my house. Everything inside will be crushed and become landfill. To me that horrible crunching racket is no different from the one my mother made in her death bed in our home in Arboledas, Estado de México in 1973. She breathed in. She was silent. It is one of those events that Rosemary and I have bonded with. She was there.

These days I keep dipping into Jorge Luís Borges – La Obra Poética 1923/1977. There are poems about my Buenos Aires where Borges mentions long zaguanes (narrow courtyards) potted plants, metal gates as entry to a garden, the noise of the Pampero wind, in a home that was his home as a young boy. He returns and writes on the time it takes for the objects in the house and the trees in the garden to recognize him.

Simplicity

It opens, the gate to the garden

with the docility of a page

that frequent devotion questions

and inside, my gaze

has no need to fix on objects

that already exist, exact, in memory.

I know the customs and souls

and that dialect of allusions

that every human gathering goes weaving.

I’ve no need to speak

nor claim false privilege;

they know me well who surround me here,

know well my afflictions and weakness.

This is to reach the highest thing,

that Heaven perhaps will grant us:

not admiration or victory

but simply to be accepted

as part of an undeniable Reality,

like stones and trees.
Jorge Luís Borges 




My mother & her wisteria
These days those poems take me back to my own roots. I can smell my mother’s wisteria and hear the noise of the portón (the metal door to our house at the end of our long garden) when my father returned from a day at the Buenos Aires Herald. I can imagine the rattles of the horse-driven carriages of the milkman, the iceman, the funeral carriages, on the cobblestones of Melían. 



Llaneza
A Haydée Lange



Se abre la verja del jardín

con la docilidad de la página

que una frecuente devoción interroga

y adentro las miradas

no precisan fijarse en los objetos

que ya están cabalmente en la memoria.

Conozco las costumbres y las almas

y ese dialecto de alusiones

que toda agrupación humana va urdiendo.

No necesito hablar

ni mentir privilegios;

bien me conocen quienes aquí me rodean,

bien saben mis congojas y mi flaqueza.

Eso es alcanzar lo más alto,

lo que tal vez nos dará el Cielo:

no admiraciones ni victorias

sino sencillamente ser admitidos

como parte de una Realidad innegable,

como las piedras y los árboles.

Jorge Luis Borges
Fervor de Buenos Aires (1923)



I remember the night when my mother with candle in one hand and scissors in the other went hunting for slugs. She was too close to one of our two palm trees and it caught fire, The flames shot up to the top. The bomberos arrived and put out the fire. The palm tree survived. This was in 1950. 


Melián 2770, Ruben Derlis, Rosemary, Rebecca & paramour - Buenos Aires 2004


In 2004 I returned with Rosemary, Rebecca, Rubén Derlis and his paramour to Melián 2770. The house was still there but the owner when he opened the door did not let me in. The palm trees were gone and there was a garage on the left side of the property. The portón was the same one that I had helped my father paint in 1949. It had the addition of a brass door knob.

It is not remarkable, in the case of Buenos Aires that a house that was built in the 1920s would still be around 84 years later. Like Borges I could imagine my youth and playing with my friend out in the street and in the garden. Most of my barrio was almost the same but the corner grocery store was gone. The boliche (store) on the other corner was also gone. It was there where my father’s friend Julio Cortázar (when he visited) would send me to buy him a pack of Arizonas.

Rosemary and I purchased our first house in Arboledas, Estado de México in 1972 with help from my mother. It was a brand new house in a brand new development in the outskirts of Mexico City. I was most proud of it.

I invited my friend Raúl Guerrero Montemayor, who worked for a posh real estate company, for dinner one day. He told me, “Your house is not a detached house.” It was then that in my ignorant simplicity i first noted that fact.

In 1975 we moved to Vancouver and rented a town house in Burnaby. We were on a corner so it was attached only on one side. We were given the chance to purchase it. We did. Rosemary wanted a house with a garden. She wanted a house that was not attached. In 1986 we moved to our present location on a corner lot in Kerrisdale. It has a garden. We live on a street, Athlone that is only two blocks long. It has 40 houses. In 1986 all of them were either Georgian or Mock Tudors with laurel hedges or none at all. Some like ours had a white picket fence (in our house it’s on the long side as the front is a laurel hedge).

By the beginning of the 90s there was an uncertainty on the final political outcome of Hong Kong when the British handed it back to mainland China.


Ned Pratt on Athlone Street - Our house on left corner and Mrs. Allm's

By 1992 houses on our area slowly were being demolished and replaced by what the populace and the media called monster homes. Attempts were made by the city to regulate the look of these houses. These attempts all failed.

Georgia Straight, October 1 1993
Around this time, in 1993, I invited noted Vancouver architect Ned Pratt for a walk in my neighbourhood. I suggested he write a story for the Georgia Straight on possible remedies that he might suggest. I took this picture of Pratt by a lot on Athlone. On the left is a new house that replaced a Mock Tudor. On the extreme left is our house. Pratt envisioned putting restrictions on the airspace over houses and developing a style that adapted the American Cape Cod cottage. That of course never happened. An article, a fine one by Kerry Mc.Phedran became a cover for the Georgia Straight. Ned Pratt told me, “I am non compos mentis, so I will suggest working on this project with two young architects Marko Simcit and James Boldt.

As I write this, Athlone now has only 8 of those 40 houses left. I am inundated daily by phone calls and knocks on the door by people in the business of buying houses, sight unseen, simply by the location. As you might imagine a corner lot is special.

Even though we (especially my money savvy wife) have always felt that a house is a home and not an investment, time has made it obvious that our home was an intelligent investment.

Back in 1973 we used to make fun of the nouveau riche in Mexico who built large houses near our development that was called Tecamachalco. The people who lived in these houses had their lampshades covered in cellophane and their Formica tables protected with plate glass. They drove brand new cars with clear plastic covers that protected the upholstery and had the quaint habit of placing crochet doilies on their car seat backs.

But when we came to Canada we wanted a new house. We could not afford one so we settled on the one on Springer Avenue. The first thing I did (really stupid) upon arriving was to buy a brand new Fiat X-19. I wanted something shiny that was not a Volkswagen Beetle. I remember fondly the day Rosemary came home with a brand new Audi.

By 1987 the shine on shiny things was off and I was making trips to Maple Ridge and Cloverdale to buy antique furniture. In that sort of wisdom that comes with age I was beginning to appreciate what was not new.

My neighbourhood has four kinds of houses. The first are the few that remain that may have been built like mine in the mid 30s. The second are that first generation homes built by developers (dishonest in my opinion and who used shoddy materials) for the immigrating Hong Kong families. They were ugly then they are uglier now. When they go on the market they are immediately torn down.

The third generation was an improvement over that first wave of houses for immigrants. In these, to my symmetrical delight, Scottish or English masons built stone walls and fences for the Chinese owners. The table was suddenly turned. These houses have heated floors and are generally made of good materials.

The fourth generation of houses are all straight lines and much in vogue now is wood siding that is a mid/orange/brown and I wonder how they will look years from now. They have lots of concrete and have elaborate concrete stairs that go to large basements. One a block from our house has an elevator.

A gentleman who lives nearby is a successful real estate man with four adult sons, two dogs, 8 cars, one trailer and one motorcycle. Obviously the four-car garage that is the width of the house can not accommodate all of those cars. In fact our street has many autos parked on the street as the families that live on Athlone have many children with their own cars.

Building regulations stipulate that if a house to be demolished is going to have a garage for three cars any big tree on that end of the property can go. These trees are going fast. One advantage for us is that we are getting a bit more light and sun into our shady garden.

Twelve years ago a family, two children and one dog, from Toronto (a Saturday Evening Post Magazine kind of family) moved to Vancouver. The father had a very good job for a local communications company. He was paid to come and funds were made available for him to buy a house across the lane from us. It’s one of those houses that was perhaps built around 1945. The family did not have a Dalmatian; it was a Labrador Retriever that went blind two years ago. The children, one boy and one girl grew up normally (abnormal these days). They went to nearby public schools and the boy practiced slapping hockey pucks at a net on our lane. They had a cottage in a nearby island. The mother liked to garden and hired a landscaper to get her good plants and trees. She has on her property several rare trees including one Cornus controversa ‘Variegata’. For those who know they would say that is one “choice” tree. 

Things
My walking-stick, small change, key-ring,

The docile lock and the belated

Notes my few days left will grant

No time to read, the cards, the table,

A book, in its pages, that pressed

Violet, the leavings of an afternoon

Doubtless unforgettable, forgotten,

The reddened mirror facing to the west

Where burns illusory dawn. Many things,

Files, sills, atlases, wine-glasses, nails,

Which serve us, like unspeaking slaves,

So blind and so mysteriously secret!

They’ll long outlast our oblivion;

And never know that we are gone.
Jorge Luís Borges


About 6 years ago I gave her one of my three Abies koreana (Korean Fir) which I bought at the UBC plant sale years before. All three were about 6 ft high by this time. They have beautiful erect cones that turn purple. The Abies on her property is now about 18 ft high. If the tree service I have alerted on the possible availability of these trees does not come in soon to ask the developer for permission to remove them, they with the house, and good appliances inside (one bicycle) will become landfill. 



Las Cosas
El bastón, las monedas, el llavero,

La dócil cerradura, las tardías

Notas que no leerán los pocos días

Que me quedan, los naipes y el tablero,

Un libro y en sus páginas la ajada

Violeta, monumento de una tarde

Sin duda inolvidable y ya olvidada,

El rojo espejo occidental en que arde

Una ilusoria aurora. ¡Cuántas cosas,

Láminas, umbrales, atlas, copas, clavos,

Nos sirven como tácitos esclavos,

Ciegas y extrañamente sigilosas!

Durarán más allá de nuestro olvido;

No sabrán nunca que nos hemos ido.

Jorge Luis Borges

 

I am not alone in wanting to keep photographs of my family, items of clothing, a Spanish fan, my daughter’s baby dresses and other such things. Objects can carry the remnants of a person’s soul as the soul once was. Our garden is full of plants, shrubs and trees that Rosemary and I liberated in the middle of the night from doomed houses nearby. I can look at a plant, a Spriraea japonica and think of where it came from. I came from Mrs. Alm’s garden across the street. In the middle of hot summer afternoons when her siesta was interrupted by noisy quarreling crows she would come out and clap her hands in a futile attempt to shoo them away. Some of the trees in our garden, where there when we arrived. I can imagine the former owner of our house, Mrs. Young planting them as seedlings with the hope that they would grow and in some away affect favorably her future in her Athlone home.

Our house & laurel hedge on left - right where Mrs. Alm's house used to be

As I look at the derelict and empty house across the lane, its grass untidy as it never ever was before I can imagine the mother briskly walking with her dog to the nearby elementary school (when her children were young) to pick them up and bring them home for what would have been a nice dinner.

Like my Mexican poet friend, Homero Aridjis I believe in the presence of ghosts that are there, invisible as they may be, haunting the derelict house. They clamor silently for us to remember that they were once there corporeally and not to forget them, at least for a while. 



These ghosts can affect the fortunes of those who might live there in a new house built over what once was a home. I can understand the idea of immigrants coming to a new country and wanting to begin anew in a new home with new things. I suppose that belief is simply the other side of my coin of knowing that indeed houses can die. Even when the house is demolished, all trees are removed, 9 bathrooms installed (where Mrs. Alm’s house once stood) I can still imagine, when I look across the boulevard, if not actually hear her hands clapping on a lazy and hot summer afternoon. 




     

Previous Posts
Carmen Aguirre - A Pasionaria

Isabel Allende At Age 18

Carmen Aguirre - A Chilean Bombshell

El Espejo - Carmen Aguirre's Search Of Vision Man

Infinity (∞), An Insipid Equivalent Of The Unfinis...

Emma Zunz

Romance Apps & The Piropo

Of Memory - Jorge Luís Borges & Thorton Wilder

Homero Aridjis - Poeta

Zippy Pinhead - Musician



Archives
1/15/06 - 1/22/06

1/22/06 - 1/29/06

1/29/06 - 2/5/06

2/5/06 - 2/12/06

2/12/06 - 2/19/06

2/19/06 - 2/26/06

2/26/06 - 3/5/06

3/5/06 - 3/12/06

3/12/06 - 3/19/06

3/19/06 - 3/26/06

3/26/06 - 4/2/06

4/2/06 - 4/9/06

4/9/06 - 4/16/06

4/16/06 - 4/23/06

4/23/06 - 4/30/06

4/30/06 - 5/7/06

5/7/06 - 5/14/06

5/14/06 - 5/21/06

5/21/06 - 5/28/06

5/28/06 - 6/4/06

6/4/06 - 6/11/06

6/11/06 - 6/18/06

6/18/06 - 6/25/06

6/25/06 - 7/2/06

7/2/06 - 7/9/06

7/9/06 - 7/16/06

7/16/06 - 7/23/06

7/23/06 - 7/30/06

7/30/06 - 8/6/06

8/6/06 - 8/13/06

8/13/06 - 8/20/06

8/20/06 - 8/27/06

8/27/06 - 9/3/06

9/3/06 - 9/10/06

9/10/06 - 9/17/06

9/17/06 - 9/24/06

9/24/06 - 10/1/06

10/1/06 - 10/8/06

10/8/06 - 10/15/06

10/15/06 - 10/22/06

10/22/06 - 10/29/06

10/29/06 - 11/5/06

11/5/06 - 11/12/06

11/12/06 - 11/19/06

11/19/06 - 11/26/06

11/26/06 - 12/3/06

12/3/06 - 12/10/06

12/10/06 - 12/17/06

12/17/06 - 12/24/06

12/24/06 - 12/31/06

12/31/06 - 1/7/07

1/7/07 - 1/14/07

1/14/07 - 1/21/07

1/21/07 - 1/28/07

1/28/07 - 2/4/07

2/4/07 - 2/11/07

2/11/07 - 2/18/07

2/18/07 - 2/25/07

2/25/07 - 3/4/07

3/4/07 - 3/11/07

3/11/07 - 3/18/07

3/18/07 - 3/25/07

3/25/07 - 4/1/07

4/1/07 - 4/8/07

4/8/07 - 4/15/07

4/15/07 - 4/22/07

4/22/07 - 4/29/07

4/29/07 - 5/6/07

5/6/07 - 5/13/07

5/13/07 - 5/20/07

5/20/07 - 5/27/07

5/27/07 - 6/3/07

6/3/07 - 6/10/07

6/10/07 - 6/17/07

6/17/07 - 6/24/07

6/24/07 - 7/1/07

7/1/07 - 7/8/07

7/8/07 - 7/15/07

7/15/07 - 7/22/07

7/22/07 - 7/29/07

7/29/07 - 8/5/07

8/5/07 - 8/12/07

8/12/07 - 8/19/07

8/19/07 - 8/26/07

8/26/07 - 9/2/07

9/2/07 - 9/9/07

9/9/07 - 9/16/07

9/16/07 - 9/23/07

9/23/07 - 9/30/07

9/30/07 - 10/7/07

10/7/07 - 10/14/07

10/14/07 - 10/21/07

10/21/07 - 10/28/07

10/28/07 - 11/4/07

11/4/07 - 11/11/07

11/11/07 - 11/18/07

11/18/07 - 11/25/07

11/25/07 - 12/2/07

12/2/07 - 12/9/07

12/9/07 - 12/16/07

12/16/07 - 12/23/07

12/23/07 - 12/30/07

12/30/07 - 1/6/08

1/6/08 - 1/13/08

1/13/08 - 1/20/08

1/20/08 - 1/27/08

1/27/08 - 2/3/08

2/3/08 - 2/10/08

2/10/08 - 2/17/08

2/17/08 - 2/24/08

2/24/08 - 3/2/08

3/2/08 - 3/9/08

3/9/08 - 3/16/08

3/16/08 - 3/23/08

3/23/08 - 3/30/08

3/30/08 - 4/6/08

4/6/08 - 4/13/08

4/13/08 - 4/20/08

4/20/08 - 4/27/08

4/27/08 - 5/4/08

5/4/08 - 5/11/08

5/11/08 - 5/18/08

5/18/08 - 5/25/08

5/25/08 - 6/1/08

6/1/08 - 6/8/08

6/8/08 - 6/15/08

6/15/08 - 6/22/08

6/22/08 - 6/29/08

6/29/08 - 7/6/08

7/6/08 - 7/13/08

7/13/08 - 7/20/08

7/20/08 - 7/27/08

7/27/08 - 8/3/08

8/3/08 - 8/10/08

8/10/08 - 8/17/08

8/17/08 - 8/24/08

8/24/08 - 8/31/08

8/31/08 - 9/7/08

9/7/08 - 9/14/08

9/14/08 - 9/21/08

9/21/08 - 9/28/08

9/28/08 - 10/5/08

10/5/08 - 10/12/08

10/12/08 - 10/19/08

10/19/08 - 10/26/08

10/26/08 - 11/2/08

11/2/08 - 11/9/08

11/9/08 - 11/16/08

11/16/08 - 11/23/08

11/23/08 - 11/30/08

11/30/08 - 12/7/08

12/7/08 - 12/14/08

12/14/08 - 12/21/08

12/21/08 - 12/28/08

12/28/08 - 1/4/09

1/4/09 - 1/11/09

1/11/09 - 1/18/09

1/18/09 - 1/25/09

1/25/09 - 2/1/09

2/1/09 - 2/8/09

2/8/09 - 2/15/09

2/15/09 - 2/22/09

2/22/09 - 3/1/09

3/1/09 - 3/8/09

3/8/09 - 3/15/09

3/15/09 - 3/22/09

3/22/09 - 3/29/09

3/29/09 - 4/5/09

4/5/09 - 4/12/09

4/12/09 - 4/19/09

4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17