A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

A Phenomenal Four Seasonal Fenómeno
Thursday, April 23, 2015

Monica Huggett - Portland March 29 2015


When it comes to violinists, virtuosity is not entirely the result of mechanical finger velocity and sheer technique, as it is with pianists. The violin is an instrument which has almost human whims—it is attuned to the mood of the player in a sympathetic rapport: a minute discomfort, the tiniest inner imbalance, a whiff of sentiment elicits an immediate resonance . . . probably because the violin, pressed against the chest, can percieve our heart’s beat. But this happens only with artists who truly have a heart that beats, who have a soul. The more sober, the more heartless a violinist is, the more uniform will be his performance, and he can count on the obedience of his fiddle, any time, any place. But this much-vaunted assurance is only the result of a spiritual limitation, and some of the greatest masters were often dependent on influences from within and without.
Thoughts on the Violin and on Violinists
Heinrich Heine (1843)




I began this blog in January 2006. Since then I have written 3404 blogs. Some of them are pretty good and some are perfunctory or simply written to fill in the week.

As far as I can tell I have never had such a big hole of missing blogs to which I must inevitably catch up to.
 
One of the reasons for the blog block could be that I am in the throws of taking portraits of women who specialize in the playing of instruments that were in use in the 17th and 18th century. I could have saved myself some unneeded worries if I had approached this project (which has taken me to Portland, Seattle, Victoria and locally to places like Ladner) with my Fuji X-E1 digital camera. Somehow I thought that these women deserved my best and my best could only be delivered in b+w film exposed with my medium format Mamiya RB-67 Pro-SD. With that camera in my hand (but on a tripod as it is very heavy) I feel the same certitude of success as King Arthur must have had while wielding Sword Excalibur.

I have at this point photographed 23 women who play instruments not all currently seen is a conventional symphony orchestra. I have had to process rolls of 120 film (ten exposures) in my darkroom which has been truly dark for some time but not of late! Knowing I could not return to re-shoot any of these women I had to make sure those 10 exposures (that was my self-imposed limit, one roll per musician) were processed correctly and that I did not precipitate the many possible mishaps that might have resulted in the ruination of my efforts.

Happily I can report that the 23 women (so far) are all perfectly exposed.

Here is a preview (I must not let the cat out of the bag) of one of the women. She is violinist Monica Huggett who is a solo/virtuoso violinist of note around the world who happens to be the Artistic Director of the Portland Baroque Orchestra.

She and her beloved and most artistically efficient orchestra will be in Vancouver on Friday, May 1 at the Chan and will perform Antonio Vivaldi’s Four Seasons which are part of his Opus 8, entitled Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione. I will write a preview, at length, about this Early Music Vancouver concert in a later blog in a couple of days.

For now I want to explain something about the colour version of my portraits of Monica Huggett. Those who have commissioned me for this project will select the final images. But not this one in colour! There are four other exposures, and in one of them Huggett closed her eyes. There is one where she shows a fine smile. But I like the no-nonsense look of this one.

I own an extended collection of Huggett’s works (all baroque) and I have seen her live a few times. When not playing she could be one of your British aunts or the cat lady around the corner. She is a serious gardener and has one by the sea (and mostly difficult chalky soil, I would guess) in England but lives in Portland.

When she plays she is transformed into another person. She plays with fuerza (I like that Spanish word) and a passion second to none. She can be delicate in quiet passages but note her formidable forearms. With them she executes music (in both senses of that verb) with no comparison in anybody else that I have ever been lucky to listen to.

And she does not forget to smile and thus display the fun she is having.

Many years ago Saturday Night Magazine hired me to photograph violin prodigy Corey Cerovsek when he was 14. They wanted me to convey in my photograph that somehow Cerovsek had talent that came from some connection with the devil. Such a connection was also attributed to Niccolò Paganini. I was able to convey the diabolical connection with lighting and a raised eyebrow but I felt happier with my image of the young boy (and a young boy he was) wearing my striped T-shirt and a bike behind him.

There is no possible way that anybody who has met Monica Huggett could ever think of such ungodly links as an explanation for her virtuosic talent.

I have a far simpler explanation courtesy of my Spanish grandmother who once saw Manolete in a bullfight. She said he was a fenómeno. There is no rational explanation for that kind of talent while the assertion that its rarity is a given. I have met one person who was a fenómeno. That was and is Canadian dancer Evelyn Hart.




A Surprise - A Commonplace Book At My Vancouver Public Library
Monday, April 20, 2015








My 17-year-old female cat Plata has become needy and possessive. She always wants to be on my lap or on Rosemary’s. She is hungry all the time and because of her age the cause is hyperthyroidism. She mews loudly when she wants her food. She drives me crazy but at the same time I see this in this way:

“Alex I am going to die soon. I will be out of your hair but until that time comes I want to share as much of what is left of my time with you.”

As I watch Rachel Maddow on TV with Rosemary and with Plata on my lap I think that this cat amply proves how we humans need human warmth and contact. Social networks will never provide any of us with that real warmth that transfers from my old Plata’s body onto mine.

All the above was reinforced by a recent trip to my Oakridge Branch of the Vancouver Public Library. For $6.00 I purchased in their reject bin (people also donate to this) a pristine set of film DVDs (7 of them) entitled the Stanley Kubrick Collection.

In the staff picks I found the Alex Guinness A Commonplace Book. In it was this poem by John Updike:

Another Dog’s Death

For days the good old bitch had been dying, her back

pinched down to the spine and arched to ease the pain,

her kidneys dry, her muzzle white. At last

I took a shovel into the woods and dug her grave



in preparation for the certain. She came along,

which I had not expected. Still, the children gone,

such expeditions were rare, and the dog,

spayed early, knew no nonhuman word for love.



She made her stiff legs trot and let her bent tail wag.

We found a spot we liked, where the pines met the field.

The sun warmed her fur as she dozed and I dug;

I carved her a safe place while she protected me.



I measured her length with the shovel’s long handle;

she perked in amusement, and sniffed the heaped-up earth.

Back down at the house, she seemed friskier,

but gagged, eating. We called the vet a few days later.



They were old friends. She held up a paw, and he

injected a violet fluid. She swooned on the lawn;

we watched her breathing quickly slow and cease.

In a wheelbarrow up to the hole, her warm fur shone.






Music For The Best Of All Possible Worlds
Sunday, April 19, 2015


Owen Underhill (with Lauri Stallings) Alexander Weimann, Bramwell Tovey



"It is demonstrable," said he, "that things cannot be otherwise than they are; for as all things have been created for some end, they must necessarily be created for the best end. Observe, for instance, the nose is formed for spectacles; therefore we wear spectacles. The legs are visibly designed for stockings; accordingly we wear stockings. Stones were made to be hewn and to construct castles; therefore my lord has a magnificent castle; for the greatest baron in the province ought to be the best lodged. Swine were intended to be eaten; therefore we eat pork all year round. And they who assert that everything is right, do not express themselves correctly; they should say that everything is best."
Master Pangloss – Candide – Votaire

One could on the same vein remark that nothing beats listening to the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra playing Mozart’s Symphony #40 K. 550 in G minor directed by Bramwell Tovey at the Orpheum.

Others would assert that the upcoming Portland Baroque Orchestra, with Monica Huggett on solo violin and directing, concert at the Chan on May 1st featuring Antonio Vivaldi’s Opus 8 Four Seasons would be better with no comparison needed.

And a smaller group, Vancouver’s Petit Avant-garde (I have coined this expression!) would state simply that nothing beats brand new compositions of this century as performed by the Turning Point Ensemble under the artistic direction of Owen Underhill.

Of late Early Music Vancouver ensembles (some quite small), the Vancouver Symphony  and the Turning Point Ensemble have been playing I smaller venues such as Pyatt Hall, the Telus Theatre at the Chan or the black box (where you are safe from atomic holocaust but your cell phone will not work) at SFU Woodwards.

If you noticed carefully you might find musicians, the same ones playing in all three orchestras plus others such as Colin MacDonald’s Pocket Orchestra or the Microcosmos Quartet (which specializes, so far, in Bártok, Britten and brand new composers, some in their early 20s).

If you happen to like jazz you may have not known or missed Turning Point Ensemble’s 2012 concert featuring the music of DukeEllington.  

On my best of all possible worlds wish list would be a concert in which a group of musicians directed by Bramwell Tovey, the Pacific Baroque Orchestra’s Alexander Weimann and Owen Underhill would each play the music of those groups in one evening here in Vancouver.

The concert could have the VSO (a smaller group) playing a Bach Brandenburg Concerto. If it were the fifth Alexander Weimann could play the harpsichord. The Pacific Baroque Orchestra might play music by a composer preceding Bach such as Heinrich Ignaz von Bieber. Turning Point Ensemble might play the Bachianas Brasileiras (any of them) by Heitor Villalobos.

I know that I would enjoy all three performances. In the best of all possible worlds surely there are more people like me out there?



A Pocket Version of Handel & Telemann's Wassermusik
Thursday, April 16, 2015



Alexander Weimann - April 15 2015

I have a vivid memory of listening for the first time a cassette tape of Pablo Casals conducting the Marlboro Festival Orchestra of Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos. The second concerto featuring the trumpet was played so fast I thought my tape player had broken. To this day this super-fast version (was Casals on amphetamines?) is my favourite and all others seem now as if they were recorded in slow motion. Could more surprises be in store? Perhaps.

I can no longer abide any version of Bach’s Concerto for 2 Violins in D minor, BWV 1043. The same goes for Vivaldi’s Four Seasons. I have heard them too many times. This is why I look forward to the Portland Baroque Orchestra with Monica Huggett tackling the Four Seasons at the Chan Centre on May 1st courtesy of Early Music Vancouver. A woman with fearsome forearms and a passion to match will enliven the work.

You might think that the same (concerto ennui)  might apply to the sometimes bombastic-sounding (as lovely as it is) Water Music by Handel. ThePacific Baroque Orchestra under the direction of Alexander Weimann is performing it this Friday and Saturday. So what may be new? Plenty!

Below is the citation from Wikipedia:

The Water Music is a collection of orchestral movements, often published as three suites, composed by George Frideric Handel. It premiered on 17 July 1717 after King George I had requested a concert on the River Thames.

The Water Music is scored for a relatively large orchestra, making it suitable for outdoor performance. Some of the music is also preserved in arrangement for a smaller orchestra; this version is not suitable for outdoor performance, as the sound of stringed instruments does not carry well in the open air.


Georg Frideric Handel (left) and King George I on the Thames River, 17 July 1717. Painting by Edouard Hamman (1819–88).

When I read the above I became curious as all the versions of Handel’s Water Music I have ever heard featured a large orchestra with lots of pomp and circumstance provided by horns, trumpets and 18th century kitchen sinks. It seems that there is a smaller version.

This is what I found:

It’s easy to imagine the well-documented first performance of Handel’s Water Music, played by at least 50 musicians on a barge floating down the Thames for a royal procession. But what was the score’s first incarnation? After all, Baroque composers would shamelessly beg, borrow and steal from their own music, whatever it took to make a few extra bob.

Enter the Brook Street Band, a young baroque chamber ensemble whose core make-up is two violins, harpsichord and cello. Upon learning of a chamber version of the Water Music in an Oxford University library, apparently penned by Handel himself, the group applied 18th century practices and adapted the music for their own forces, adding an oboe doubling on recorder. The resulting world premier recording recreates how Handel’s popular music may have been enjoyed by 18th century folk in the privacy of their own home.

From the above web site I found out that the Brook Street Band is called that because they took their name from the London street where Handel lived for most of his life in London.

Is there any chance we might ever hear something like the above in an intimate location (Pyatt Hall on Seymour Street for example)?

You might never know by the following information on the concert on the Pacific Baroque Orchestra web site:

A lavish collection of orchestral suites for woodwinds and strings by Handel (Watermusic) and Telemann (A lavish collection of orchestral suites for woodwinds and strings by Handel (Watermusic) and Telemann (Hamburger Ebb' und Fluth, La Bourse) celebrating the water and its powerful tides, both literally and as a metaphor for change. Majestic music at the end of our season for a city that lives from and with water.) celebrating the water and its powerful tides, both literally and as a metaphor for change. Majestic music at the end of our season for a city that lives from and with water.


I am happy to report that something like that Oxford version is in the works for Friday and Saturday.

I know this because yesterday Wednesday I attended a rehearsal of the Pacific Baroque Orchestra. The orchestra featured (all period instruments) one harpsichord (Weimann) two violins, Chloe Myers and Linda Melsted, one viola, Paul Luchkow, one bassoonist, Katrina Russell, two oboes, Matthew Jennejohn  and Curtis Forster, that doubled on recorders, one violone player Natalie Mackie, and  Nathan Whittaker on cello.

It was most interesting to watch and listen to Weimann make some of the musicians go silent or to listen to violinists who were a bit confused as to what part they might play as they (one violinist, the second violinist ) was replacing two. Weimann informed that oboe players that he would bring the horn parts for Thursday. In many instances some of the players did have confusing moments when they were unsure which part of the two parts they had to play. At all times I was under the impression that the 9 musicians were all collaborating, on the spot on a work that will be brand new. Weimman, and the 8 were putting together a Vancouver Version (not the Oxford!) of Handel’s Water Music.

As the only spectator I felt very much like George I in his palace listening to an intimate chamber orchestra play beautiful music. It seemed they were playing just for me.

It was wonderful, refreshing, to hear every individual instrument play and not a full orchestra with the instruments blending in. If anything there were times when Weimann seemed to be going for clashes and he often said these two parts sound the same and so would change the mix. To me I was listening to something being re-born.

As for Telemann’s  Hamburger Ebb' und Fluth, La Bourse in honour of the German port of Hamburg I know a lot less and my only reference is my CD by Musica Antiqu Köln. In the last few years Georg Philipp Telemann seems to have been all but ignored  by orchestras in our city, a city which lies by the water. I even wonder if any contemporary (this century) or last century composers of Vancouver city have ever composed anything about our water and our frequent rain.

Alexander Weimann & Chloe Myers

Thanks to the Pacific Baroque Orchestra I can celebrate water if for a few hours in the dry and intimate surrounding of Pyatt Hall on Saturday. Those living near or in Langley can take their dose of intimacy on Friday..

As I left the rehearsal hall I thought of Weimann the German who smiles (even if a tad efficiently but I must add so naturally) and that his nation has an excellent track record of making powerful and compact statements. They have done it with their formidable (but smallish) pocket battleships of WWII, their Leicas and now Weimann is doing it with a pocket version of Handel’s Water Music. The same will apply to Telemann’s work. In my Musica  Antiqua  Köln I counted 23 musicians. Imagine 9.









     

Previous Posts
A Phenomenal Four Seasonal Fenómeno

A Surprise - A Commonplace Book At My Vancouver Pu...

Music For The Best Of All Possible Worlds

A Pocket Version of Handel & Telemann's Wassermusi...

How Images Affected Me

My Fair Lady - It Was Loverly

Masque - An Evening Of New Music With The Petit Av...

Dumb Dick Falls For Wrong Girl

A Blue Easter Girl

Sábado De Gloria - Gringo Viejo



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8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15