A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Is She The Duchesse?
Saturday, June 24, 2017




June 24 2017

At one time in our old Kerrisdale garden we had plant labels for all our plants. This meant that if I did not consider my Rosemary’s many perennials I had 600-plu labels for my hostas and 85 for my roses. Since our move and even before our move labels were lost and now we have quite a few mystery plants in our Kitsilano garden.

One of them is a rose which I am sure is the Centifolia/hybrid perpetual (they cannot make up their mind on this one) Rosa ‘Duchesse de Rohan’.

It bloomed a bit later than all my Gallicas and the only way I will eventually be able to identify it will happen if it re-blooms. Hybrid Perpetuals ( an inaccurate misnomer) do bloom more than once. So if in the fall it blooms she will be the Duchesse.

For those who might want to explore who she was here is the Wikipedia citation.  



Abraham Darby - Three Men & an Over the Top Rose
Thursday, June 22, 2017

Rosa 'Abraham Darby' June 22 2017


I find it nicely paradoxical that the most fragrant rose in my garden and a rose that blooms and blooms (large ones at that) is an English Rose named after a man (three perhaps) who made the industrial revolution of the 19th century possible with the discovery of the relation of coke with iron ore.

Abraham Darby
British ironmaster
Written By:

The Editors of Encyclopædia Britannica
Abraham Darby, (born 1678?, near Dudley, Worcestershire, Eng.—died March 8, 1717, Madeley Court, Worcestershire), British ironmaster who first successfully smelted iron ore with coke.

Darby, who had used coke in smelting copper in Bristol, in 1708 founded the Bristol Iron Company. He acquired premises at Coalbrookdale, on the Severn, close to supplies of low-sulfur coal. In 1709 he produced marketable iron in a coke-fired furnace. He presently demonstrated the superiority of coke in cost and efficiency by building much larger furnaces than were possible with charcoal as a fuel, the latter being too weak to support a heavy charge of iron.

The quality of Darby’s iron made it possible for him to manufacture thin castings that could compete successfully with brass in such applications as the manufacture of pots and other hollow ware.

The advent of the Thomas Newcomen steam engine in 1712 created an important new market for iron; by 1758, when Darby had been succeeded by his eldest son, Abraham Darby (1711–63), more than 100 Newcomen cylinders had been cast at Coalbrookdale. In 1779 Darby’s grandson, Abraham Darby III (1750–91), completed one of the world’s first cast-iron bridges (at present-day Ironbridge, near Coalbrookdale), and in 1802 the Coalbrookdale Works built the first railway locomotive with a high-pressure boiler, for Richard Trevithick, an English engineer and inventor.

Some years ago I visited Shropshire and I had the pleasure of walking on the Iron Bridge.





Doctor Pat McGeer - The Basketball Player
Monday, June 19, 2017






“No hay mal que por bien no venga.”

While it sounds a lot better in Spanish if you translate it into English is makes sense anyway. Bad stuff happens for good reasons.

Three bad things happened yesterday Sunday. One of them began on Thursday when my Rosemary was recovering from a left knee replacement operation. The doctor found she was losing blood somewhere. After quite a few tests they discovered she has an ulcer in her lower oesophagus or stomach. The ulcer is due to the fact that Rosemary has an acid stomach and acid reflux. So they did not release to my care and her cat Casi-Casi until yesterday. That was the first good thing coming out of the discovery of the ulcer. Now she is going to be treated.

Parking at the UBC Hospital is easy but a tad expensive. I went down to park in the temporary 15 minute zone as the nurse upstairs was taking her time in releasing Rosemary. This was bad!
As I was inserting my credit card into the parking machine a man (no taller than I am) looking very fit and perhaps my age passed by. I stopped him with a question, "Do you play basketball?” His answer was, “I used to.” That answer confirmed my almost suspicion that the man was Doctor Pat McGeer. I asked him if he was visiting someone in the hospital of if he was not well. His answer was a resounding, “I work here.” And he went on to the detail of the cancer research that he is doing into stopping cancer cells from draining stuff from the body on people who are supposed to be terminal (and are not he asserted). He then asked me to guess his age. I am a gentleman (sometimes) so I never ask that question or answer it. His answer, “I am 90,” Floored me.

That was the second good thing to follow a bad thing.

The third situation was to go to my granddaughter’s violin recital. The first half of the program featured 27 (one hour and thirty minutes) soloists playing uncertain notes. But there are two good things. One my Lauren is learning to read music. That is good. The second good thing is that there was Cornelia Oberlander who is past 90 years with a head and brain that are all here. A couple of years ago in a reunion to celebrate the life of architect Abraham Rogatnick she told us some scary statements about global warming here.

Now there is a an axe to grind here (not too sharp) for one of the last two persons left at the Vancouver Sun that I know. One is IanMulgrew and the other (for whom I am sharpening the axe) is John Mackie. Mackie in a frequent page 2 column reminds us of personalities and events in our city and province’s past. This is very good.

My suggestion is that some of those people from our past , landscape architect Cornelia Oberlander and the Doctor of Everything, Pat McGeer have all kinds of relevant stuff right now that we should know about.

Yes John Mackie!

And I have to bang on my own drum here. Is there anybody else out there archiving what has happened in our city besides what you might find in my lowly blog? 




The State of Being Alone
Sunday, June 18, 2017





In an essay on American jazz pianist Craig Taborn in today’s NY Times writer Adam Shatz quotes James Baldwin. The quote froze me.


Fascinated by his artistry, dazzled by his erudition and curiosity, I would occasionally suggest a coffee or a drink. He always replied yes, but whenever it came time to make a plan, he’d retreat into silence. This, I realized, was the condition of his creativity, and I grew to respect it. James Baldwin wrote that:

 “perhaps the primary distinction of the artist is that he must actively cultivate that state which most men, necessarily, must avoid: the state of being alone.”



Taborn has embraced this state, which echoes powerfully through his probing, introspective music.


These days of being obsolete – redundant & retired I have been left in my thoughts a lot. I feel a terrible isolation. It is almost like that word of the 60s, alienation.

My wife is back from the hospital after her left knee replacement. She is much more mobile than we thought she would be but I am taking care of her. Days go by quickly and nothing seems to happen. I move back and forth between checking on her in our bedroom, seeing the latest on Trump on MSNBC and crossing the deck (in a glory of roses and other flowers) to my oficina where I sit down to write as I am doing this precise instant.

I never considered myself (I am a photographer) to be an artist. In Vancouver to think one is an artist is a route to extreme depression and suicide. But in the year 2000 I met up with Argentine artists Nora Patrich and Juan Manuel Sánchez a sort of Argentine version of Shadbolt did not suffer fools and he told me I was an artist. I was not going to argue with him. So I am an artist and fame and fortune will follow a few months after my eventual death. Of that I am sure!

Meanwhile this isolation that I feel, in Baldwin’s words, read below have clicked in my head without too much of an indigestion. Perhaps this isolation is good and I will be soon feel inspired to go in some direction as yet unknown to me.

Below you will find some Fuji FP-3000B peels (what you peel and we all used throw away after looking at the instant b+w print). They randomly stay as negatives and others become semi-positive in something called the Sabatier Effect. The last photograph is a peel from the also discontinued (Alas!) Fuji FP-100C

I have written many times how a photographer’s studio can be a dead end of creativity. There you are behind your camera; a subject in front of you; a background (grey) behind and a light or lights on one side. Often nothing will happen.

It has been nice to pursue creativity in the environment of a person’s home and trying when possible to use existing light. These are pictures of my friend Nina. I am no Helmut Newton (nobody is) but I do attempt to show that eroticism can happen in the mundane milieu of a home.  















Red
Saturday, June 17, 2017

Rosa 'Souvenir du Docteur Jamain' June 17 2017



Red is the color at the longer-wavelengths end of the spectrum of visible light next to orange, at the opposite end from violet. Red color has a predominant light wavelength of roughly 620–740 nanometers. Light with a longer wavelength than red but shorter than terahertz radiation and microwave is called infrared.

Red is one of the additive primary colors of visible light, along with green and blue, which in Red Green Blue (RGB) color systems are combined to create all the colors on a computer monitor or television screen. Red is one of the subtractive secondary colors, resulting from the combination of yellow and magenta. (See CMYK color model.) Traditionally, it was viewed as a primary subtractive colour, along with yellow and blue, in the RYB color space and traditional color wheel formerly used by painters and artists. Reds can vary in shade from very light pink to very dark maroon or burgundy; and in hue from the bright orange-red scarlet or vermilion to the bluish-red crimson. Red is the complementary color of cyan.
Wikipedia

Blue



Grace & Elegance
Friday, June 16, 2017

Hosta 'Liberty' June 22 2017


My entry into serious gardening began when we moved to a mostly shady but big garden in Kerrisdale in Vancouver in 1986. Most botanical publications mentioned a plant called hosta. By the time we left that garden in 2015 to our present location in Kitsilano I had amassed some 600 plus of the plant. My discerning eye (because I like hostas) could and can note the difference between one variegated wonder and another. 




But if you look closely during the growing season of this shade tolerant (never loving) plant you might notice as I did many years ago that the unopened flowers on the tips of the scapes (hosta lingo for stalk) are quite elegant. When they open some of these flowers can be awfully fragrant as is the pure white flower of Hosta plantaginea sometimes called the August lily.
Here you can admire the graceful about-to-open bloom of Hosta ‘Liberty’.



I hoed and trenched and weeded
Thursday, June 15, 2017

Rosa 'A Shropshire Lad' June 14 2017

A Shropshire Lad
Brother Cadfael 
Mary Webb 
A Shropshire Lad Revisited



In our previous large garden on Athlone Street in Kerrisdale, Vancouver we had 85 roses. Most of them were Old Roses such as Gallicas and Albas. We also had many English Roses.

Our garden had encroaching shade from neighbouring trees. Many of our roses were languishing in too much shade. One of them the English Rose Rosa ‘A Shropshire Lad’ which was and is shade tolerant simply had too much shade. When we left our garden to move into our small Kitsilano one I left it behind. I regretted it.

Fortunately a member of the Vancouver Rose Society informed us that she wanted to get rid of some of her roses. One of them was Shropshire Lad!  I documented the bringing of the very large rose from North Vancouver to our laneway garden.



Some years ago I went on a tour of Shropshire so everything Shropshire is dear to me including A.E. Houseman’s poem.

A. E. Housman (1859–1936).  A Shropshire Lad.  1896.

LXIII. I hoed and trenched and weeded


I HOED and trenched and weeded,    
  And took the flowers to fair: 
I brought them home unheeded;      
  The hue was not the wear.    

So up and down I sow them            
  For lads like me to find,        
When I shall lie below them,   
  A dead man out of mind.      

Some seed the birds devour,   
  And some the season mars,          
But here and there will flower 
  The solitary stars,       

And fields will yearly bear them       
  As light-leaved spring comes on,    
And luckless lads will wear them              
  When I am dead and gone.

I have at my age of almost 75 a preference for the above last poem.

Rosa 'A Shropshire Lad' on left followed by Souvenir du Docteur Jamain,  Chapeau de Napoléon and William Lob





     

Previous Posts
Is She The Duchesse?

Abraham Darby - Three Men & an Over the Top Rose

Doctor Pat McGeer - The Basketball Player

The State of Being Alone

Red

Grace & Elegance

I hoed and trenched and weeded

Performances That Have Melted Into Thin Air

Love Is Doing - Rosemary Does

Resistentialism & Free Will



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3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17