A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Stephen, his Pussycat & Michelangelo's Poems
Wednesday, November 20, 2019






Because I am a product of that past century (I believe I may have a dozen blogs within my 4886 of them that begin like that) books have been part of my life.

Almost four years ago, faced with around 4000 books and the difficult prospect to moving to a small duplex, I attempted to give away books. The Vancouver Public Library spokespersons told me that they were not a repository of books. Few of my friends were interested. Don Stewart at Macleod Books accepted about 300. A mystery book store in upper Hastings in Burnaby took some 150. I then personally threw into a neighbourhood construction bin 1000 books. In my mind was the memory of Peron’s minions burning books before his fall in 1954.

It was painful, and to make it worse (it helped sink in my melancholy), I threw my Dostoyevsky books (softcovers) while loudly saying in the middle of the night, “Goodbye Dostoyevsky, old friend.”





All this, because it seemed to be less stressful to throw them away than find a home for them.

When we finally moved to our present Kitsilano little house I swore I would never buy any more books. With the exception of a fewer than 10, I have stuck to my guns with new books. With used books it has been a terrible but ultimately pleasant relapse. Don Stewart at Macleod’s has been responsible for many of them. The others come from random searches in wheeled carts with books not wanted by our neighbourhood Vancouver Public Libraries. Neil Young's Waging Heavy Peace ($0.50) is making the rounds of my daughter Ale's community in Lillooet.

Today at a nearby thrift store (a beautifully posh one) called Hob Too on West Broadway I found, Portrait – The Life of Thomas Eakins by William S. McFeely, Madame Valentino –The Many Faces of Natacha Rambowa by Michael Morris and the little slim book featured in today’s blog.





I have chosen my favourite of Michelangelo’s poems which in this case is opposite one of his drawings (with no connection that I can discern to the poem) and I am left with wonder at who was the mysterious Stephen who seemed to have been working in the exclusive London, S.W.1. district and who addresses his equally mysterious Sue as Pussycat in the lovely little card that I found in the book.



My grandmother often told me, “La ignorancia es atrevida,” or, “ignorance is daring.” I must admit that I never heard of Michelangelo’s poems. And that the lovely and challenging introduction by Michael Ayrton is of an English artist I had no prior knowledge of.








no te quemen las llamas
Monday, November 18, 2019


18 November 2019


“Las primaveras al marcharse dejan las lloviznas de otoño preparadas… Pequeña, ve despacio, mucho juicio, no te quemen tus llamas.“
Alfonsina Storni

When springs march away they leave ready, fall drizzle ... Little one, go slowly, use judgment, should your flames burn you...
My translation 

In this recent NY Times Sunday Book Review entitled Cult of the Literary Sad Woman much is written about Sylvia Plath and other literary women who committed suicide.

I have a friend, a very well read friend in Buenos Aires who like quite a few Argentines cannot speak or read English. I often tell him all he misses. But there is another side to this coin. This is that Latin America has a rich literary output and a lot of the very best is not known north of the equator. One such literary giant  (and definitely a sad woman) was Argentine (Swiss-born) poet Alfonsina Storni (
29 May 1892 – 25 October 1938) who did commit suicide and somehow wrote many poems about her death including the last one which she sent to La Nacíon newspaper a few days before her death.

While most of Jorge Luís Borges and Mario Vargas Llosa has been translated into English little of Storni and not all of Julio Cortázar has. This is a pity, particularly since those living north of the equator have been championing Frida Kahlo for her independence and proto feminism. Little has been written about other fisty women like Tina Modotti, Lee Miller and Alfonsina Storni. Storni was a single mother when to be so was anathema. Her poetry is erotic and sad, most of the time.

Today I scanned these rose leaves and their beauty instantly reminded me that Storni's first poems were published as La Inquietud del Rosal (1916) or the Uneasiness of the Rose [bush].

What is most interesting is that this 77-year-old just six years ago had no knowledge of Storni. Before I visited Buenos Aires in 2013 I was approached by a young Argentine woman (Roxana but I call her Yuki) who said she would be pleased to pose for me and that she wanted to do something related to Alfonsina Storni. And so it happened and Storni's book (Antología Mayor) shares space on my bed table with Emily Dickinson, Jorge Luís Borges and Julio Cortázar.




November left - then clambered up
Sunday, November 17, 2019


Top rose hips,  Rosa complicata,   right, rose hips Rosa 'Souvenir du Docteur Jamain', leaves Rosa sirecea ssp. omeiensis var. pteracantha 17 November 2019



Now that it is past mid November I might be able to retire my scanner for repair. Littel is left in our garden to scan. After a few years of using it (this has happened once before) the solvents from the plastic in the works underneath the scanner bottom glass has a thin opaque coating. And the placing of many plants and hard objects on the glass has left scratches. It is a pain to correct them with Photoshop. So the time has come to have my Epson PerfectionV700 Photo looked after.

Emily Dickinson wrote at least three poems with the word November in them. This is the third that I have found. Note, below this blog, there are all the Emily Dickinson poems I have mated up to now with my scans of plants and with my photographs.

November was finishing when I found you. 
Making November difficult



589 – Emily Dickinson

The Night was wide, and furnished scant
With but a single Star —
That often as a Cloud it met —
Blew out itself — for fear —

The Wind pursued the little Bush —
And drove away the Leaves
November left — then clambered up
And fretted in the Eaves —

No Squirrel went abroad —
A Dog's belated feet
Like intermittent Plush, be heard
Adown the empty Street —

To feel if Blinds be fast —
And closer to the fire —
Her little Rocking Chair to draw —
And shiver for the Poor —

The Housewife's gentle Task —
How pleasanter — said she
Unto the Sofa opposite —
The Sleet — than May, no Thee —

More Emily Dickinson: 

You cannot make remembrance grow
November

 A melancholy of a waning summer
Just as green and as white
It's full as opera
I cannot dance upon my Toes
a door just opened on the street 
Amber slips away
Sleep
When August burning low
Pink Small and punctual
A slash of blue
I cannot dance upon my toes
Ah little rose
For hold them, blue to blue
The colour of the grave is green
 Her Grace is not all she has  
To know if any human eyes were near
Linda Melsted - the music of the violin does not emerge alone
The Charm invests her face
A sepal, a petal and a thorn
The Savior must have been a docile Gentleman
T were blessed to have seen
There is no frigate like a book
I pay in satin cash
Emily Dickinson's White Dress & a Hunter of Lost Souls
El vestido blanco - The White Dress
Water makes many beds
 The viola da gamba
 But sequence ravelled out of reach
 A parasol is the umbrella's daughter
 Without the power to die
 Lessons on the piny
Ample make this bed
How happy is the little stone
 Sleep is supposed to be
The shutting of the eye
I dwell in possibility
when Sappho was a living girl
In a library
 A light exists in spring
The lady dare not lift her veil
 I took my power in my hand
 I find my feet have further goals
 I cannot dance upon my toes
The Music of the Violin does not emerge alone
Red Blaze 
He touched me, so I live to know
Rear Window- The Entering Takes Away
Said Death to Passion
 We Wear the Mask That Grins And Lies
It was not death for I stood alone
The Music in the Violin Does Not Emerge Alone
I tend my flowers for thee
Lavinia Norcross Dickinson
Pray gather me anemone! 
Ample make her bed
His caravan of red 
Me-come! My dazzled face  
Develops pearl and weed

But peers beyond her mesh
Surgeons must be very careful
Water is taught by thirst
I could not prove that years had feet
April played her fiddle
A violin in Baize replaced
I think the longest hour
The spirit lasts
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/03/i-left-them-in-ground-emily-dickinson.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2014/01/i-felt-my-life-with-both-my-hands.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/currer-bell-emily-dickinson-charlotte.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/03/and-zero-at-bone-with-dirks-of-melody.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/05/charm-invests-her-face.html

http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/i-could-not-see-to-see.html 
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2011/06/blonde-assasin-passes-on.html
http://blog.alexwaterhousehayward.com/2012/12/you-almost-bathed-your-tongue.html













 




Pianos & not so pianissimo
Thursday, November 14, 2019


Filomena de Irureta Goyena


Because I have written 4885 blogs to date I have no memory of many of them. This one on pianos (and see below) suddenly appeared in my memory during a midnight bout of my usual insomnia. Thinking about it I do know I have written blogs about ties, beds and bras. Looking at this one on pianos I rather enjoyed it.

Just today I located a review of a March 1966 concert by Thelonius Monk in Geneva by Argentine writer Julio Cortázar. Alas as nice as it is only those who can read Spanish will savour it as I did!


Corey Hamm - September 4 - 2017 - Roy Barnett Hall UBC School of Music

The piano as a musical instrument has been in my mind as of late. Thinking about it I realized I have quite a few photographs of people by pianos either pianists or simply sitting by one.
My first introduction to the piano came at age 8 when my parents took me to the Teatro Colón in Buenos Aires for a concert featuring Arthur Rubinstein.

My mother did not own a piano but my grandmother did. We would often go in Tram 35 to my Abuelita’s flat and my mother would first accompany my her (she was a coloratura soprano) and my Uncle Tony who was a fine tenor. They would sing American musical songs. Then my mother would play (she read very well) Chopin and in particular I have a fond memory of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata. 


Jane Coop at Cecil Green, UBC My inspiration for the Corey Hamm portrait

My mother did not have access to a piano until she began to teach at the ALCOA Aluminio School in Veracruz, Mexico in the late 50s. The few students who attended the school did so at my mother’s home so a piano was bought. When I visited her she would play at my request the US Marine Corps Hymn.

In the late 60s she bought an upright piano a black Bechstein. When she moved to live with us (Rosemary, Alexandra and Hilary) we were having money problems so she sold the piano. I was heartbroken at her decision. I have never forgotten her sacrifice.


Filomena de Irureta Goyena (my mother) at the piano sometime in the late 30s in Manila

Around 1998 our neighbour across the street on Athlone Street (she was in her 80s) told us that she was looking for a home for her Chickering baby grand. Her grandmother had given it to her when she was a little girl. She offered it to us for $500. I was easily transported from her living room to ours.

Shortly after we obtained the Chickering I decided to give a summer party featuring alto saxophonist Gavin Walker and pianist Eric Vaughn. It was a beautifully warm summer evening and I remember sitting at the front entrance smoking a Montecristo accompanied by Malcolm Parry.

My eldest daughter Ale who plays the classical guitar can handle a piano nicely and she likes to play with my youngest granddaughter, Lauren, 15, music for four hands.

Because of my mother’s sacrifice in selling her piano and my deep guilt, a year and a half ago we had the piano restored by Mike Storey and soon it will be tuned. The piano sits in what we call the piano room. We have old lawyer’s stacking bookcases and my vermillion upholstered psychiatric couch (the piano bench is also upholstered in the same material which also matches the brand new red piano felts.


Olena with Curtis Daily's baroque bass in our piano room


Some reading this (and this is long) might notice some photographs that have harpsichords.
For many years I was not impressed by the instrument. In large baroque orchestras I could never hear it. Solo harpsichord playing left me cold.

All that changed when Alexander Weimann landed in Vancouver to be the Artistic Director of the Pacific Baroque Orchestra. He explained how in many instances nothing he played as a continuo performer for a baroque orchestra was written and he had to improvise. With the connection between the harpsichord and my love for jazz my ears suddenly opened to the charms of the instrument.

Finally on taking photographs of pianists. This is really a cliché. I discovered that all has been done before and the one exception was the Stravinsky portrait by Arnold Newman. I ripped off the idea for a Globe&Mail article on Vancouver artist Rodney Graham.


Rodney Graham


Igor Stravinsky - Arnold Newman

Some years ago I was asked by Vancouver Pianist Jane Coop to take her portraits. I found a way which I liked (and so did she). It was that method that I used a few days ago on Corey Hamm. Another time I had to photograph noted local pianist Robert Silverman who had recorded Beethoven’s 32 Piano Sonatas. I decided to skip the piano on that occasion.


Jane Coop

Robert Silverman


Alexander Weimann preparing for Handel's Water Music


Michael Jarvis and his square Chickering with Paul Luchkow, Rebecca Stewart and Lauren Stewart


Craig Tomlinson harpsichord maker

Deuphine Lauver in our piano room

Bertrand Cuiller and Benjamin Perrot of La Reveuse with Matthew White centre




Jacques Ogg


Dave Brubeck - Photograph Richard Avedon

John Elliot Gardiner at the CBC

Michael Jarvis

Bramwell Tovey & Alexander Weimann

Alexander Weimann & Reginald Mobley


Alexander Weimann & Bramwell Tovey

Nicole Scriabin (grand niece to Alexander Scriabin) at our Chickering

Alexander Weimann

Laura Vanek - Novo Ensemble



Lauri Stallings & Owen Underhill at piano

Alexander Weimann

Corey Hamm & Nicole Li




Rosemary Waterhouse-Hayward at the Chickering


Jamie Parker & Edmond Kilpatrick

Kathryn Petersen still plays on keyboards but has switched to the accordion noir



Illustration by Graham Walker

Peggy Lee, Jane Hays, François Houle  & Marc Destrubé - Quartet for the End of Time

Rebecca Stewart at the Chickering

Milton Glasser pianist and dentist (he is the one who said, " I have been tickling the ivories for years.") with my daughter Ale in Mexico City in the early 70s


Mr. & Mrs Tomlinson,  Marc Destrubé, Byron Schenkman & Natalie Mackie









     

Previous Posts
Stephen, his Pussycat & Michelangelo's Poems

no te quemen las llamas

November left - then clambered up

Pianos & not so pianissimo

and the Orchis

Revisiting Kate Davitt & George Hurrell

You cannot make Remembrance grow

Competing for Excellence in the Last Century

Latency in Dicontinuance

November was finishing when I found you



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1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17

10/1/17 - 10/8/17

10/8/17 - 10/15/17

10/15/17 - 10/22/17

10/22/17 - 10/29/17

10/29/17 - 11/5/17

11/5/17 - 11/12/17

11/12/17 - 11/19/17

11/19/17 - 11/26/17

11/26/17 - 12/3/17

12/3/17 - 12/10/17

12/10/17 - 12/17/17

12/17/17 - 12/24/17

12/24/17 - 12/31/17

12/31/17 - 1/7/18

1/7/18 - 1/14/18

1/14/18 - 1/21/18

1/21/18 - 1/28/18

1/28/18 - 2/4/18

2/4/18 - 2/11/18

2/11/18 - 2/18/18

2/18/18 - 2/25/18

2/25/18 - 3/4/18

3/4/18 - 3/11/18

3/11/18 - 3/18/18

3/18/18 - 3/25/18

3/25/18 - 4/1/18

4/1/18 - 4/8/18

4/8/18 - 4/15/18

4/15/18 - 4/22/18

4/22/18 - 4/29/18

4/29/18 - 5/6/18

5/6/18 - 5/13/18

5/13/18 - 5/20/18

5/20/18 - 5/27/18

5/27/18 - 6/3/18

6/3/18 - 6/10/18

6/10/18 - 6/17/18

6/17/18 - 6/24/18

6/24/18 - 7/1/18

7/1/18 - 7/8/18

7/8/18 - 7/15/18

7/15/18 - 7/22/18

7/22/18 - 7/29/18

7/29/18 - 8/5/18

8/5/18 - 8/12/18

8/12/18 - 8/19/18

8/19/18 - 8/26/18

8/26/18 - 9/2/18

9/2/18 - 9/9/18

9/9/18 - 9/16/18

9/16/18 - 9/23/18

9/23/18 - 9/30/18

9/30/18 - 10/7/18

10/7/18 - 10/14/18

10/14/18 - 10/21/18

10/21/18 - 10/28/18

10/28/18 - 11/4/18

11/4/18 - 11/11/18

11/11/18 - 11/18/18

11/18/18 - 11/25/18

11/25/18 - 12/2/18

12/2/18 - 12/9/18

12/9/18 - 12/16/18

12/16/18 - 12/23/18

12/23/18 - 12/30/18

12/30/18 - 1/6/19

1/6/19 - 1/13/19

1/13/19 - 1/20/19

1/20/19 - 1/27/19

1/27/19 - 2/3/19

2/3/19 - 2/10/19

2/10/19 - 2/17/19

2/17/19 - 2/24/19

3/3/19 - 3/10/19

3/10/19 - 3/17/19

3/17/19 - 3/24/19

3/24/19 - 3/31/19

3/31/19 - 4/7/19

4/7/19 - 4/14/19

4/14/19 - 4/21/19

4/21/19 - 4/28/19

4/28/19 - 5/5/19

5/5/19 - 5/12/19

5/12/19 - 5/19/19

5/19/19 - 5/26/19

5/26/19 - 6/2/19

6/2/19 - 6/9/19

6/9/19 - 6/16/19

6/16/19 - 6/23/19

6/23/19 - 6/30/19

6/30/19 - 7/7/19

7/7/19 - 7/14/19

7/14/19 - 7/21/19

7/21/19 - 7/28/19

7/28/19 - 8/4/19

8/4/19 - 8/11/19

8/11/19 - 8/18/19

8/18/19 - 8/25/19

8/25/19 - 9/1/19

9/1/19 - 9/8/19

9/8/19 - 9/15/19

9/15/19 - 9/22/19

9/22/19 - 9/29/19

9/29/19 - 10/6/19

10/6/19 - 10/13/19

10/13/19 - 10/20/19

10/20/19 - 10/27/19

10/27/19 - 11/3/19

11/3/19 - 11/10/19

11/10/19 - 11/17/19

11/17/19 - 11/24/19