A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

Novo's Marina Hasselberg Opportunely Channels Guilhermina Suggia
Sunday, November 23, 2014


St. Philip's Anglican, Sunday November 23, 2014


On Sunday I went to a concert held at St. Philip's Anglican Church on the West-side. It featured the Novo Ensemble (in this iteration, as it varies, but always with Marina Hasselberg on cello), with Mark McGregor, flute and Mark Haney on double bass. The music, all brand new, featured works from composers Jordan Nobles, Michael Oesterle, James Maxwell, Luc Martin and Nicolás González Thomas. All five of the compositions were new without being (to use an old, and I believe exhausted phrase), Bartók-like.

The program was played a week before at Pyatt Hall on Seymour Street (around the corner from the Orpheum) but I waited because of financial restrictions (entry to the church concert was by donation!) but also knowing that the acoustics of St. Philip's are as good as they get in this city. And when you consider that you are surrounded by beautiful stained-glass windows you cannot lose.


Two of the pieces I thought special. The first Lux by Jordan Nobles had the flute playing a melody while the cello and bass played an extended and recurrent bass line. John Oliver, noted Vancouver composer, who was present refused to out and out agree with me that Lux was sort of a chaconne. His statement to we was, “Lux is what it is and that’s it and I will not resort to baroque terminology.” Lux had Mark McGregor playing what this amateur would call harmonics, some so low key you might not have heard them had you been elsewhere in a venue without enhanced acoustics. Mark Haney pretty well tapped (loudly sometimes) the lower tip of his bow on his instruments cords.

The second piece, it moved me immediately, and particularly in the second movement was Michael Oesterle’s Rambler Rose (a two movement work). It left me with an impression, a nostalgia, that this was something inspired by Bach’s suites for unaccompanied cello. That Hasselberg was indeed playing solo cello added to that pleasant feeling. Perhaps it had all to do that these days, unless one looks for them, it is not all that common to be exposed to contemporary pieces for solo cello.

Mark McGregor's flute was never strident to my ears and Mark Haney's bass was a pleasure to listen to, for once as a featured instrument and not part of the background bass sound of so many orchestras. All in all a concert to savour and to also make me look forward to the next installment of the Novo Ensemble. In a short while Hasselberg has managed to penetrate two camps of music whose fans seem to be apart. With her endpinned cello she has found eager new music composers willing to write for her and with her baroque cello she has participated in concerts of Early Music Vancouver. Surely could she not be the bridge between these folks that seem to have irreconcilable differences?  

But this blog does not end here! 


After the first performed work, Nobles’ Lux two elderly ladies behind me were giggling. I turned around and I said, “You are probably commenting on the cellist’s shoes.” One of them put her hand on my shoulder and said, “Bless you, yes!”

In 1964 one of my first girlfriends gave me Bach’s Suites for unaccompanied cello played by Pablo Casals. It was an Angel recording. When my scratched records became unplayable I purchase sometime in the beginning of the 80s the CD version even though I had no CD player.

Cellists, as far as I was concerned were men. It was a man’s instrument.

How a cellist holds the instrument has been a running controversy since Antonio Vivaldi’s time at Ospedale della Pieta in Venice in the early 18th century. When his all-girl orchestra entertained convent guests they were hidden from view by an iron lattice.

Some say it was because some of the women were deformed but most likely it had to do with the way women cellists (men, too) had to hold the instrument firmly between their legs. The difficulty for women holding a cello in a lady-like manner (side saddle?) may have contributed to the paucity of women cellists before the 20th century.

That did not inhibit Joyce Menting, the first woman I ever saw playing a baroque cello for Vancouver’s Pacific Baroque Orchestra at a performance I attended in 1992. I was amazed. She held her cello firmly between her legs, as there was no endpin on her baroque instrument to stabilize it on the floor. In fact some say that the invention of the endpin ushered in women cello players as it relaxed the woman’s hold (her legs) on the cello.


Though the endpin was in use as early as the 17th century, it did not meet with universal approval until the late 19th century. The benefits of playing with the endpin were important for all cellists but particularly so for women, for whom it was a virtual necessity” feminine grace was saved in the more upright position and relaxed posture permitted by the pin. The use of the endpin is probably the main cause of the sudden surge of women cellists in the late 1800s.
Russell A. Tilden, “The Development  of the Cello Endpin,” Imago musicae, IV (1987)

With Mark McGregor

Menting wore a black skirt, fine stockings and black suede shoes. Her mascara seemed to be in the same shade as her stockings.

Not too long after I was sitting on the last row of the Orpheum’s ground floor with many older concert goers in wheel chairs. The first half of the concert featured Tchaikovsky’s Cello Concerto. The soloist was the beautiful Shauna Rolston who was wearing tight black pants a flimsy blouse and a snake armlet on her left arm. After the interval the room literally emptied before the VSO started Shostakovich’s Symphony Number 2. I was amazed as this symphony may have been contemporary to many of the senior citizens present. Perhaps they had all come for the Tchaikovsky and the bonus snake armlet.


With Mark Haney
That cellist Marina Hasselberg who plays both cello variants, the modern one with the endpin and the baroque without is from Portugal is beautifully (1885-1950) who caused a fuss and a minor scandal when she studied under Pablo Casals, became his mistress (and some say she married him) who did away with the side saddle and brought her own brand (besides her obvious virtuosity) of grace, glamour, fashion sense to an instrument heretofore the domain of men.

Suggia dumped (some say) Casals and moved to England in the 1920s. It was there that Welsh painter Augustus John (his own illegitimate daughter, Amaryliss Fleming became a well-known cellist) painted Suggia’s portrait now in the Tate’s collection. Of the painting the Manchester Guardian wrote, “It will serve to remind future generations that here was a musician who matched the nobility of her art with that of her presence on the concert platform.”


Madame Suggia - Augustus John - 1920/23
That of course explains no doubt why the two women behind me were giggling at Hasselberg’s exquisite high heel shoes, tight black pants and elegant old top, not to mention freshly and surgically snipped bangs.

Watching Hasselberg play on Sunday the words of Stephen Gwynn, “When Suggia Was Playing,” Country Life Magazine, November 26, 1927 seem to be most appropriate:


It was a delight to see her, before each bout began, sit up alert, balance and adjust her bow as a fencer balances his foil, then settle herself with that huge tortoise between her knees, like a  jockey sitting down to the ride: erect first and watchful, till gradually, caught by the stream she created she swung with it, gently, sleepily, languidly, until the mood shifted, the stream grew a torrent and the group rocked and swayed almost to wreckage. Or again, she would be sitting forward, taking her mount by the head, curbing it, fretting it, with imperious staccato movements, mastering it completely – letting it free to caracol easily, or once more break into full course, gathering itself in, extending itself, in a wild gallop…And then at the end, with some long-drawn sighing fall, or with one abrupt vehement clang of sound, she would finish, would raise her bow high, in a gesture of dismissal, break the magic and come to the top like a diver, a little breathless and smiling. 

I welcome this triple injection of glamour, youth and virtuosity. Vancouver will profit.




St. Joan of Arc, Big Macs & Meg Roe
Wednesday, November 19, 2014


St. Joan of Arc: Shall I arise from the dead and come back to you, a living woman?

Warwick: Rome made you a saint, we had no hand in the business. Let Rome decide.
Cauchon: Stay where you are, woman. A dead saint is always safer for the Church than a living one...

 
Meg Roe

There are some people who go to Macdonald’s and yet cannot abide the Big Macs. They might tell you that they go for the fries. And I cannot fault them.

In the same way you may not want to spend the money to go to the theatre. You might be persuaded to do so only if the play is an experimental one or at the opposite extreme one that is tried and true. You might then want to go to see It’s a Wonderful Life this season. As far as I know if that is your decision you will be out of luck.

On the other hand you might want to go to see a play that is rarely performed. Such a play is George Bernard Shaw’s St. Joan. and Arts Club Theatre Company presentation at the Stanley. Should you want to see the 1957 film version directed by Otto Preminger, starring Jean Seberg your only game in town is a VHS recording at Limelight Video on Broadway and Alma. Not even the Vancouver Public Library has it.         

St. Joan, starring Meg Roe and a long cast of who’s who Vancouver thespians is having a few more performances until this Sunday, November 23. There is a matinee this Saturday at 2 plus an evening performance and a matinee on Sunday.

Why am I telling you this?

For many years writer Les Wiseman and I would go to rock concerts at the Commodore (Wiseman had a Vancouver Magazine column called In One Ear to which I contributed as a photographer). Because we were snobs we would sometimes go to see the excellent warm-up act and then skip (over a beer) the headliners.

You might not be religious and not interested in plays with a religious content. You might have all kinds of other excuses not to see St. Joan but as Wiseman always told me, paraphrasing Hunter S. Thompson, “As your attorney I strongly suggest you see this.” Wiseman was always right.

My reason for suggesting St. Joan is simply that you want to watch a virtuoso acting performance which will be remembered for many years.




PBO, Curtis Daily, Patricia Hutter & Two Basses On A Date
Tuesday, November 18, 2014



The Pacific Baroque Orchestra is presenting this program on Friday November 28 and on Sunday November 30.

Curtis Daily in my garden

A curious fact is that perhaps because the program includes two composers (besides that of 17th century Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber von Bibern) of the late 18th century, Luigi Boccherini and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart a rare instrument and its owner are traveling from Portland to play in it. Curtis Daily and his baroque bass are both participants and members of the Portland Baroque Orchestra. Those who know will tell you that since the orchestra is headed by violinist Monica Huggett, the standards of the orchestra are as high as they come. If anything that also tells you that the demands of Pacific Baroque Orchestra Musical Director and virtuoso harpshichordist, Alexander Weimann are as high. Daily is also a member of the Seattle Baroque Orchestra


Patricia Hutter & Nicolo

Interesting too is that Daily and his bass have a date on Athlone Street, Saturday November 29 at 12:30 PM with my near neighbour Patricia Hutter (formerly a bass player for the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra) and her Italian bass called Nicolo.

Of his bass Daily wrote me this:

Just a thought for Alex, I would really like to take some photos of both of the old Italian basses when we visit Patricia.

My bass was made in Venice, Italy, circa 1770, so it's pretty old now, but probably not as old as Patricia's. My bass was most likely commissioned from the shop whose name is associated with it, Ignacio Ongaro (one of the big violin shops in Venice at the time), by a school or church. Its dimensions were probably roughed out by a boy, then finished up by somebody that knew what they were doing. I can show you the tool marks where the apprentice went too far.

The bass was still in Venice in 1906, which I know because of a repair label inside it from a well known Venetian maker, dated 1906 for repairs that he had made to it. At some point after that it made it's way to Oakland California in the Italian 20th century Italian migration; likely in pieces because that would be simpler given the horrible conditions that many of them travelled to the US in. The person I bought it from found it in a violin shop in Oakland in the early 60s in pieces. He bought it and eventually had it restored. He was the principal bassist in the San Francisco Symphony for many years, and has just in the last decade retired.

I am looking forward to perhaps finding ou, when Daily, Hutter and the two basses meet, if Daily has a name for his Venetian instrument. And perhaps, too, he might explain to me the difference (if there is one) between a baroque bass and a violone. 



Microcosmos Quartet, Béla Bartók & Tom Cone's Laughing Ghost
Sunday, November 16, 2014



 
Tom Cone - 1947 - 2012

Béla Bartók wrote six string quartets. His fifth he composed in 1934. Eighty years later I heard it for the first time with a laughing ghost over my shoulder.

Thanks to (because might be a better choice of word) the Microcosmos String Quartet headed by Marc Destrubé on violin, Andrea Siradze, violin, Rebecca Windham, cello and Tawnya Popoff on viola, I found this work uncommonly lyrical. How is this possible?

Perhaps it has to do with the fact that for the last year I have heard Bartók’s first four quartets, more than once in concerts held in pleasant surroundings, homes of music lovers, all performed by the Microcosmos Quartet. With those Bartok compositions I have also listened to all (three) of Benjamin Britten’s string quartets.


With the 20th century over ever so most definitely it was about time I was exposed to this kind of music. It is the purpose and goal of Microcosmos (info on the reason for this name here) to promote this kind of music that is so underplayed which has been at the same time so influential. I sometimes think that Bartók is in the same camp of notoriety/fame as Noam Chomsky. People know who he is but you can never pin them down in being able to explain them.

Destrubé has helped us the frequent concert goers to his quartet Bartók concerts to humanize and soften the man. One story is that Bartók’s son Peter watched his father go into his study, where he worked on his compositions, and close the door. Minutes later he heard his father repeatedly laughing.

Sitting barely five feet away from the quartet in this last nicely sunny afternoon I knew that the surroundings of the house were familiar. Indeed I was in the house of Karen Matthews, who was the partner of Vancouver playwright and librettist Tom Cone. Everything in the house nicely smacked of an interest in good books, design and art. In fact we were informed that many concerts of new music have been played there.

Behind me there was a nice young man with a smile on his face. The nice young man, Thomas Weideman, born in 1992, was there to listen with us to the premiere (East Vancouver premiere, that is) of his 2014 work changing at the same time.

Between R. Murray Schafer’s 1970 String Quartet No. 1 and Bartók’s lyrical (at times!) String Quartet No. 5 we heard the quartet play, purely on their instrument’s harmonics, Weideman’s soft and pleasing (a palate cleanser, Destrubé called it) piece.

Interesting to us, since Destrubé always explains the facts and the story behind the works his quartet plays, was learning that while most composers’ quartets put an effort to bring together those two violins, viola and cello, Schafer had done the opposite! The musicians all tried to escape one of a time from the constraints of the composition. 


If you add to the warm surroundings with pleasant people the idea that a laughing ghost was present it all added to a fine musical Sunday in which I can now attest that should I hear any of those first five Bartók quartets in a recording or on the radio I just might be able to identify that so serious Hungarian.






Early Music Vancouver's Monteverdi & Stile Moderno
Friday, November 14, 2014

Make it new!
Ezra Pound

What is new music?

Tarquinio Merula's  Ciaccona played by Il Giardino Armonico


The month of November has included for me two concerts that featured Western music of the 17th Century. This is music of the early baroque. Until most recently this kind of repertoire was only the expertise of a small minority of connoisseurs. Just like the Colt revolver (the Peacemaker) made easy killing readily available and it sort of evened the playing field, now YouTube has given us at least 30 versions of Antonio Bertali, Claudio Monteverdi, Tarquinio Merula, Francesca Caccini, Giovani Girolamo Kapsperger, Andrea Falconieri, Arcangelo Corelli,Johann Heinrich Schmelzer, etc of a chiacona (chaconne and many other spellings) which filled the no-radio airways of the 17th century. If you have never heard this 17th century chiacona before you will find it surprising that most of them induce you to want to dance and clap and if you are not careful you just might spend a whole night looking for them on YouTube as I did recently.

Stephen Stubbs

It all began for me when I heard Arcangelo Corelli’s Opus 5 Folia played by Monica Huggett on violin. Mitzi Meyerson on harpsichord, Sarah Cunningham, cello and Nigel North on archlute, theorbo and guitar. I discovered a tune, perhaps rampant in the 16th century that was “covered” by all sorts of composers in Europe including Folias collected by an Englishman called John Playford. I heard this Folia or ground (and we shall soon find out that a ground is simply the English word for chiacona, chaconne, etc). This ground I heard in a delightful CD Apollo’s Banquet with David Douglas on violin, Paul O’Dette, theorbo and Andrew Lawrence-King, harps.

I will write about two concerts. One was Early Music Vancouver’s Sunday (November 9) concert Monteverdi’s Songs of Love and War at the Orpheum Annex, Seymour and Robson, and the other Stile Moderno’s Friday concert Light and Dark held at the lovely chapel of St. Andrew Wesley’s Church on Burrard and Nelson.

Reginald L. Mobley

In the former, not too well hidden I heard two grounds or chacones and in the latter the concert ended with Antonio Bertali’s Chiacona.

Some nights ago I thought of that Penthouse Magazine short story that I read in the late 80s about a group of LA music promoters who came up with the idea of bringing in something new from the past to inject with a jolt the music scene of the city. They hopped on a time machine and brought back baroque composer and harpsichord virtuoso Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757). Their plan did not go as planned. Scarlatti discovered the Moog synthesizer and dropped out. He was last seen playing with a rock band. 

Tekla Cunningham, Catherine Webster, Elizabeth Reed, Stephen Stubbs

I thought about going to the 50s and bringing back Gerry Mulligan and his pianoless quartet. By eliminating the piano from the standard jazz quartet, piano, a sax, a bass and drums and adding a trumpet it imposed an uncommon stress and obligation on the sax and the trumpet (later the trombone). This idea shook up the jazz world.

I don’t know how fresh Mulligan’s quartet would sound in comparison to what is now considered to be jazz. Perhaps Mulligan would find YouTube’s samples of 17 century baroque music tempting and he and his baritone sax would drop out and join Stile Moderno’s trio of lute, violin and viola da gamba.

Tuning the baroque harp
 As far-fetched as that might sound I discovered that in that 17th century in which baroque music seemed to follow a formula, a priest, Claudio Monteverdi decided to shake it up a bit. This is better explained below. It also clues me in as to why Dutch-born Arthur Neele, violin, Natalie Mackie, viola da gamba and Konstantin Bozhinov, archlute call their trio Stile Moderno.

Seconda pratica, literally "second practice", is the counterpart to prima pratica and is more commonly referred to as Stile moderno. The term "Seconda prattica" was coined by Claudio Monteverdi to distance his music from that of e.g. Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina and Gioseffo Zarlino and describes early music of the Baroque period which encouraged more freedom from the rigorous limitations of dissonances and counterpoint characteristic of the prima pratica.

Stile moderno was coined as an expression by Giulio Caccini in his 1602 work Le nuove musiche which contained numerous monodies. New for Caccini's songs were that the accompaniment was completely submissive in contrast to the lyric; hence, more precisely, Caccini's Stile moderno-monodies have ornamentations spelled out in the score, which earlier had been up to the performer to supply. Also this marks the starting point of basso continuo which also was a feature in Caccini's work.

In the preface of his 5th Book of Madrigals (1605) Monteverdi announced a book of his own: Seconda pratica, overo perfettione della moderna musica. Such a book is not extant. But the preface of his 8th Book of Madrigals (1638) seems to be virtually a fragment of it. Therein Monteverdi claims to have invented a new “agitated” style (Genere concitato, later called Stile concitato) to make the music "complete/perfect" ("perfetto").

Gerald Drebes: ‘‘Monteverdis Kontrastprinzip, die Vorrede zu seinem 8. Madrigalbuch und das Genere concitato‘‘, in: Musiktheorie, Jg. 6, 1991, p. 29-42.


Stephen Stubbs and Maxine Eilander
  
So in the Early Music Vancouver concert Pacific Music Works (Seattle) Tekla Cunningham and Linda Melsted, violins, Elizabeth Reed, viola da gamba, Maxine Eilander, harp and harpsichord, Stephen Stubbs, lute and Direction, Catherine Webster and Danielle Reutter-Harrah, sopranos, Reginald Mobley, countertenor, Ross Hauck and Aaron Sheehan, tenors and Douglas Williams, bass I found out how Monteverdi shook up the establishment. The lyrics to his pieces brought and almost hyper reality to the idea of war and love and in one piece Chiomo d’oro, sopranos Catherine Webster and Danielle Reutter-Harrah performed a rousing chaconne-like work that thinly disguised that the words were about a most pleasant sexual orgasm! This work would have perhaps caused Monteverdi’s bête-noir Luigi Palestrina to inform friend Pope Julius III to intercede and excommunicate Monteverdi who happened to be a priest.

 Of Monteverdi soprano Catherine Webster (who sang solo in a beautiful rendition of Monteverdi’s Et e pur dunque vero) conveyed this to me via e-mail:


I'm quite sure I owe my interest in early music to Monteverdi's "Lamento della Ninfa" .  It was played in my college music history course and I couldn't believe what I was hearing.  The passacaglia is such a powerful yet simple device, and I don't think I'd heard true dissonance or language expressed that way - and there were instruments I didn't recognize!  A few years later I saw my first live performance of the Vespers (it was an EMV production!) and could hardly sit in my seat.  I love seeing the music on the page; much of it is quite easy to hear even in the layout:  the "battle" music actually looks like it sounds, with its generally triple time and declamatory style.  Then there are these rich extended cadences in a more renaissance style that seem to be from outer space:  the last section of "Hor che'l ciel" is breath-taking and actually an extremely sophisticated example of modernized madrigal word- features a solo singer with solo violin (most have two treble instruments).  I think Monteverdi really intended the violin to reflect - and guide - the psychological state of the singer.  painting.  Monteverdi was convinced that his new style could truly depict the words and emotions of the poetry so that the listener felt physically moved - and if the performance is great you'll hear a visceral reaction from the audience!  In the solo piece "Ed e pur dunque vero" I did with Tekla on violin, there were moments I found difficult not to gasp, move somehow or melt into oblivion - the musical motives seem to mirror the effect of emotion on the physical self.  It's quite a progressive piece, and the only 17th-century one I know of that

Besides the wonderful ground (chaconne-like performance of Chiomo d’oro) I particularly enjoyed Ego flos campi which featured the fabulous Boston-based countertenor Reginald Mobley. Even when all singers were in unison in some of the other works I could hear his voice separately. Mobley besides being a countertenor of note, likes to shock the establishment with his own personal stile moderno involving always wearing spats and in this later occasion a most startling facial hair arrangement. Via e-mail Mobley sent me the following explanation:

Reginald L. Mobley
You asked me to say a little something about the beard?

Frankly, there's not much to it. I've always had an interest in sculpting facial hair. It's been my most frequent form of self expression. From lightning bolts, to tiger stripes, to even a spiral, my face has served as a mobile canvas with my own hair as its medium. It just so happened that I've gone through a Wonder Woman Renaissance recently. It all culminated with me dressing as a sort of WW inspired "Wonder Boy" for Halloween. The beard reflects the Eagle that adorns her breastplate. Since I haven't had time to hide and let my beard grow out, I've chosen to keep it for a while.

~Reggie


I must point out that Early Music Vancouver's Musical Director Matthew White (a fine countertenor) new bearded look reminded me of that other Monteverdi opera that was once performed in Vancouver at Christ Church Cathedral. This was his Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria. White's new swarthy look would make him a splendid choice to play the lead role. I wanted to photograph viola de gambist Elizabeth Reed's beautiful black slippers that had a sparkling band go up the middle of the foot but she was fast out of the building as she had an airplane to catch. All I could do was hum in my mind an Allman Brothers Band song I first heard in 1971, In Memory of Elizabeth Reed.

Early Music Vancouver’s Songs of Love and War was performed in the intimate and brand new Orpheum Annex, around the corner from the Orpheum. The space with its raised seating and smallish room affords a good view, wonderful acoustics and an intimate place for music that might have at one time have been performed to a select audience of potentates. That we are now able to listen to this exciting music (new to me and new to just about anybody else) in Vancouver says something about that axis of goodness that is Portland, Seattle and our fair city. All three cities have virtuoso performers that specialize in the baroque period. The three have joined forces to bring us as of now music that aches to be listened to by anybody who might be tired of the conventional repertoire, heretofore offered. 

Next Early Music Vancouver Concert December 21


A case in point is Stile Moderno. In Friday’s performance at St Wesley’s most of the composers featured were new to me. My 12 year-old granddaughter Lauren who has been playing the violin (by her own choice to my amazement) for four years was all ears as she sketched on her sketch book. I had prepared her for the last piece, Antonio Bertali’s Chiacona by telling her that she would want to stand up to dance. What really helped her appreciate it was lutenist Konstantin Bozhinov’s approach which was much like a rock guitarist’s. Somehow the startling new music of the 17th century (with some of those odd right wrong notes) was made more relevant by the smiles of the performers who were having with us a splendid time. 



I cannot stop here without pointing out that I absolutely hate the accordion. It seems that some years ago accordion player Bozhinov, had his own road to Damascus moment and suddenly became interested in the lute, archlute and theorbo.  These three instruments, depending on whom you talk to are all the one and the same or not. Ray Nurse, who makes these instruments was Bozhinov’s mentor and we can only thank him from saving us from the bellows. I happen to know that a virtuoso violinist in the audience also had his moment on the road to Damascus and he/she, too abandoned the accordion for the better instrument.


















Stile Moderno - Arthur Neele, Natalie Mackie, Konstantin Ruslanov Bozhinov




At the end of the concert Lauren wanted to see the sheet music. She looked at the above by Antonio Bertali and told me, "I can read this but if I read it as fast as I can I would not be able to  play any of it." Time will tell if Lauren will pursue the violin but I know that just by being able to read music she has added a new dimension to her ability to think. She also told me she was looking forward to the next Stile Moderno concert.

Christina Hutten the multi instrumentalist ( harpsichord, piano and organ) who is helping out at Early Music Vancouver (she is an able harpsichord tuner) and who is getting her doctorate at UBC School of music sat down to play the beautiful not so little organ of the St. Andrew Wesley's chapel. We were all impressed and only wonder if Stile Moderno might not just fit in that instrument in a future concert.

Stile Moderno



La Mujer De Verde
Thursday, November 13, 2014




 
Bronwen Marsden - November 2014


La Mujer de Verde - Izal

La respuesta siempre será así
No hay alternativa,
si la hubiera no me gustaría.

Mira la ciudad por la ventana
de la cafetería,
y me dice que sonría.

Sé que ella quisiera regalar
sus superpoderes
igualarse a los demás.

La mujer de Verde
se ha vuelto a poner el traje
para rescatarme.
¿Qué sucederá cuando las balas no reboten
y los malos sean más fuertes
y volar no sea tan fácil
y conozcan nuestros planes?

Dame una señal,
yo buscaré un disfraz
de carnaval.
Encontraremos algo en el desván
prometo no estorbar.

(Ooooooh, oooooooh)

La mujer de Verde
se ha vuelto a poner el traje
para rescatarme.
¿Qué sucederá cuando las balas no reboten
y los malos sean más fuertes
y volar no sea tan fácil
y conozcan nuestros planes?

Hazme una señal,
yo buscaré un disfraz
de carnaval.
Encontraremos algo en el desván
prometo no estorbar.

Tú dame una señal
yo buscaré un disfraz
de carnaval.
Encontraremos algo en el desván
prometo no estorbar.

Tú dame una señal
yo buscaré un disfraz
de carnaval.
Encontraremos algo en el desván
prometo no estorbar.
(no estorbar)

Tú dame una señal...
yo buscaré un disfraz...




Meg Roe - Joan of Arc
Wednesday, November 12, 2014





Yes: they told me you were fools, and that I was not to listen to your fine words nor trust your charity. You promised me my life; but you lied. You think that life is nothing but not being stone dead. It is not the bread and water I fear: I can live on bread: when have I asked for more? It is not hardship to drink water if the water be clean. Bread has no sorrow for me, and water no affliction. But to shut me from the light of the sky and the sight of the fields and flowers; to chain my feet so that I can never again ride with the soldiers nor climb the hills; to make me breathe foul damp darkness, to keep me from everything that brings me back to the love of God when your wickedness and foolishness tempt me to hate Him: all this is worse than the furnace in the Bible that was heated seven times. I could do without my warhorse; I could drag about in a skirt; I could let the banners and the trumpets and the knights and the soldiers pass me and leave me behind as they leave the other women, if only I could still hear the wind in the trees, the larks in the sunshine, the young lambs crying through the healthy frost, and the blessed blessed church bells that send my angel voices floating to me on the wind. But without these things I cannot live; and by your waiting to take them away from me, or from any human creature, I know that your counsel is of the devil, and that mine is of God.
Saint Joan - George Bernard Shaw

Saint Joan by George Bernard Shaw at the Arts Club Theatre Company's Stanley Industrial Alliance Stage is on until November 23.




     

Previous Posts
Novo's Marina Hasselberg Opportunely Channels Guil...

St. Joan of Arc, Big Macs & Meg Roe

PBO, Curtis Daily, Patricia Hutter & Two Basses On...

Microcosmos Quartet, Béla Bartók & Tom Cone's Laug...

Early Music Vancouver's Monteverdi & Stile Moderno...

La Mujer De Verde

Meg Roe - Joan of Arc

Scriabin & John Cage's 4'33"

Penelope (Sandrine Cassini) Again

Kind Of Blue



Archives
1/15/06 - 1/22/06

1/22/06 - 1/29/06

1/29/06 - 2/5/06

2/5/06 - 2/12/06

2/12/06 - 2/19/06

2/19/06 - 2/26/06

2/26/06 - 3/5/06

3/5/06 - 3/12/06

3/12/06 - 3/19/06

3/19/06 - 3/26/06

3/26/06 - 4/2/06

4/2/06 - 4/9/06

4/9/06 - 4/16/06

4/16/06 - 4/23/06

4/23/06 - 4/30/06

4/30/06 - 5/7/06

5/7/06 - 5/14/06

5/14/06 - 5/21/06

5/21/06 - 5/28/06

5/28/06 - 6/4/06

6/4/06 - 6/11/06

6/11/06 - 6/18/06

6/18/06 - 6/25/06

6/25/06 - 7/2/06

7/2/06 - 7/9/06

7/9/06 - 7/16/06

7/16/06 - 7/23/06

7/23/06 - 7/30/06

7/30/06 - 8/6/06

8/6/06 - 8/13/06

8/13/06 - 8/20/06

8/20/06 - 8/27/06

8/27/06 - 9/3/06

9/3/06 - 9/10/06

9/10/06 - 9/17/06

9/17/06 - 9/24/06

9/24/06 - 10/1/06

10/1/06 - 10/8/06

10/8/06 - 10/15/06

10/15/06 - 10/22/06

10/22/06 - 10/29/06

10/29/06 - 11/5/06

11/5/06 - 11/12/06

11/12/06 - 11/19/06

11/19/06 - 11/26/06

11/26/06 - 12/3/06

12/3/06 - 12/10/06

12/10/06 - 12/17/06

12/17/06 - 12/24/06

12/24/06 - 12/31/06

12/31/06 - 1/7/07

1/7/07 - 1/14/07

1/14/07 - 1/21/07

1/21/07 - 1/28/07

1/28/07 - 2/4/07

2/4/07 - 2/11/07

2/11/07 - 2/18/07

2/18/07 - 2/25/07

2/25/07 - 3/4/07

3/4/07 - 3/11/07

3/11/07 - 3/18/07

3/18/07 - 3/25/07

3/25/07 - 4/1/07

4/1/07 - 4/8/07

4/8/07 - 4/15/07

4/15/07 - 4/22/07

4/22/07 - 4/29/07

4/29/07 - 5/6/07

5/6/07 - 5/13/07

5/13/07 - 5/20/07

5/20/07 - 5/27/07

5/27/07 - 6/3/07

6/3/07 - 6/10/07

6/10/07 - 6/17/07

6/17/07 - 6/24/07

6/24/07 - 7/1/07

7/1/07 - 7/8/07

7/8/07 - 7/15/07

7/15/07 - 7/22/07

7/22/07 - 7/29/07

7/29/07 - 8/5/07

8/5/07 - 8/12/07

8/12/07 - 8/19/07

8/19/07 - 8/26/07

8/26/07 - 9/2/07

9/2/07 - 9/9/07

9/9/07 - 9/16/07

9/16/07 - 9/23/07

9/23/07 - 9/30/07

9/30/07 - 10/7/07

10/7/07 - 10/14/07

10/14/07 - 10/21/07

10/21/07 - 10/28/07

10/28/07 - 11/4/07

11/4/07 - 11/11/07

11/11/07 - 11/18/07

11/18/07 - 11/25/07

11/25/07 - 12/2/07

12/2/07 - 12/9/07

12/9/07 - 12/16/07

12/16/07 - 12/23/07

12/23/07 - 12/30/07

12/30/07 - 1/6/08

1/6/08 - 1/13/08

1/13/08 - 1/20/08

1/20/08 - 1/27/08

1/27/08 - 2/3/08

2/3/08 - 2/10/08

2/10/08 - 2/17/08

2/17/08 - 2/24/08

2/24/08 - 3/2/08

3/2/08 - 3/9/08

3/9/08 - 3/16/08

3/16/08 - 3/23/08

3/23/08 - 3/30/08

3/30/08 - 4/6/08

4/6/08 - 4/13/08

4/13/08 - 4/20/08

4/20/08 - 4/27/08

4/27/08 - 5/4/08

5/4/08 - 5/11/08

5/11/08 - 5/18/08

5/18/08 - 5/25/08

5/25/08 - 6/1/08

6/1/08 - 6/8/08

6/8/08 - 6/15/08

6/15/08 - 6/22/08

6/22/08 - 6/29/08

6/29/08 - 7/6/08

7/6/08 - 7/13/08

7/13/08 - 7/20/08

7/20/08 - 7/27/08

7/27/08 - 8/3/08

8/3/08 - 8/10/08

8/10/08 - 8/17/08

8/17/08 - 8/24/08

8/24/08 - 8/31/08

8/31/08 - 9/7/08

9/7/08 - 9/14/08

9/14/08 - 9/21/08

9/21/08 - 9/28/08

9/28/08 - 10/5/08

10/5/08 - 10/12/08

10/12/08 - 10/19/08

10/19/08 - 10/26/08

10/26/08 - 11/2/08

11/2/08 - 11/9/08

11/9/08 - 11/16/08

11/16/08 - 11/23/08

11/23/08 - 11/30/08

11/30/08 - 12/7/08

12/7/08 - 12/14/08

12/14/08 - 12/21/08

12/21/08 - 12/28/08

12/28/08 - 1/4/09

1/4/09 - 1/11/09

1/11/09 - 1/18/09

1/18/09 - 1/25/09

1/25/09 - 2/1/09

2/1/09 - 2/8/09

2/8/09 - 2/15/09

2/15/09 - 2/22/09

2/22/09 - 3/1/09

3/1/09 - 3/8/09

3/8/09 - 3/15/09

3/15/09 - 3/22/09

3/22/09 - 3/29/09

3/29/09 - 4/5/09

4/5/09 - 4/12/09

4/12/09 - 4/19/09

4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14