A THOUSAND WORDS - Alex Waterhouse-Hayward's blog on pictures, plants, politics and whatever else is on his mind.




 

I Smiled During Gli Angeli Genève's Actus Tragicus
Saturday, August 04, 2018


Alex Potter, Philippe Miqueu & Aleksandra Lewandowska


 Former Vancouver Magazine editor and now the Vancouver Sun gossip columnist Malcolm Parry coined the expression “the privileged view”.

For him if you saw a very tall building you had to be on the roof to look down to have the view that is exclusive. He taught me to avoid, as a photographer, that which was not privileged. I learned to photograph rock bands and other musicians backstage and never up front on the concert stage.

One of my entries into Parry’s privileged view in music is by helping billet Early Music Vancouver musicians from abroad in our Kitsilano home. From these musicians you get the inside goods and you are able to do what I did yesterday in the afternoon which was to take Gli Angeli Genève bassoonist Philippe Miqueu to the rehearsal for last night’s concert Bach Cantatas: Actus Tragicus at Christ Church Cathedral. The sold out concert was part of that great Vancouver/ Early Music Vancouver tradition  our summer Vancouver Bach Festival which still has one more week to go.

We arrived at 4 and the rehearsal was supposed to begin precisely at 4:15.

It did not. 




The director of Gli Angeli Genève, Stephan MacLeod (sporting sandals, sans socks, perhaps in solidarity to former Early Music Vancouver Artistic Director and Founder José Verstappen) was late. 

My first impression was that here you had a Swiss timepiece emulating an American Timex with a rundown battery. 

Thinking about it with all that holiday rush traffic I understood his lateness.

I was able to observe from my privileged position a kind man who communicates with his group (in whispers) in the necessary languages of French, German and English.

Curiously there was something new for me. I have seen violinist and leader of all kinds of world musical quartets and groups, Marc Destrubé direct and orchestra while playing a violin. One of his techniques is to bend his feet on his toes upwards. The result is that many of his concert shoes are decidedly curled upwards.

I have seen a virtuoso harpsichordist (and keyboardist, too) Alexander Weimann, the director of the Pacific Baroque Orchestra, conduct it while playing the harpsichord standing up.




But this was the first time I have seen an unusually handsome voice bass/baritone, Stephan MacLeod (founder of the group) direct while singing.

The first change is that the order, from left to right of sopranos, altos, tenors and baritones/bass is modified with the baritones/bass  singers in the middle.

I was privy to a further fascinating event and this is MacLeod’s pleasant obsession with the direction and loudness of sound. Various times he instructed his singers not to be so loud. But what was interesting was how he moved some of his singers, especially countertenor (sometimes called male altos) poker-playing-faced Alex Potter to an extreme stage right. Macleod is into voice separation not into a mishmash voice blend.  




At one point in order to project sound better he had violinist (she is not all that tall) Anïs Chen stand on a riser. During the evening's performance I enjoyed moments of extreme quiet in which the singers were barely audible and I could hear, clealry, the recorders of  Bart Coen and Jan Van Hoecke.

All the time I watched a man of precision become passionate with his instructions. My guess is that while the group is based in Geneva, the combination of musicians from many parts of Europe and the fact that Switzerland has the elements of Italy, Germany and France, it is able to draw from those cultures all that is convenient.

In the pre-concert talk the slim MacLeod explained why his singers come in twos to a final count of 8. Eight can project individuality and with skill the opposite. It is more difficult to do that with more singers.

Going back to the idea and pleasure of hosting visiting Early Music Vancouver musicians is the fun my Rosemary and I have in conversing (I like the word conversar, to speak in verse that we use in my native Argentina) with musicians who, like architects and artists, are well-versed in a variety of subjects. Furthermore it is a pleasure to show these musicians three elements that we have as a plentiful bonanza in Vancouver (and certainly lacking in some other countries of the world) which are air, space and water.

But it is also fun to “corrupt” them nicely to stuff that they may not have experienced before.

Philippe Miqueu brought his clarinetist wife Fabienne (alas no clarinet parts in Bach!) along, so when I took them to town, as we were walking by Robson Square I asked them, “How would you like a root beer?” The word beer was music to their ears. And so we had frosty root beers at A&W. I am sure this was their first time!


Fabienne & Philippe Miqueu

Many people have written and will write about the wonders of the music of Bach. Rosemary and I were sitting next to two young men. I asked them how it was that two young men would come to a concert filled with old people like me. Their answer made me smile, “We like Bach.”

Why Bach?
Why Bach? II 

Yes I loved Bach’s Gottes Zeit ist die Allebeste Zeit Cantata BWV 106 particularly in Versus 2 that featured countertenor Alex Potter, and how he was moved to extreme stage right in Versus 4 and 7. I loved Cantata BWV 131 “Aus der Tiefen rufe ich, Herr zu Dir”.

But the best for me was twofold.

In Georg Phillip Telemann’s “Du aber, Daniel, ghe hin” Funeral Cantata tvwv4:17 which has many unusual (and dark) arias and recitatives for Stephan MacLeod’s bass/baritone voice (an elegant one) right there almost at the end (like a ray of light) there was an aria, Brecht, ihr müden Augenlieder sung by soprano Aleksandra Lewandoska (she and smiling tenor Thomas Hobbs I have seen before here both came in August 2017 as did also Alex Potter ). The aria was happy and more so watching Philippe with a big smile on his face playing his bassoon while bending his knees up and down. When I told him that his performance in that aria reminded me of Lawrence Welk he was puzzled! 

Thomas Hobbs - The Evangelist

After listening to many versions of this aria on YouTube I can assure you that Gli Angeli Geneve’s is the best. And probably this is because of the performance of Emmanuel Laporte’s oboe in conjunction with Philippe Miqueu.


Felix Knecht, violoncello, Philippe Miqueu, basoon & Emmanuel Laporte, oboe.

And there was to be, as in that Canaan wedding, the best wine appearing in the end an encore of Buxtehude’s  BuxWV062 passacaglia which since I love all folias, chaconnes and passacaglias was fantastic. One minor wrinkle is that oboe player Emmanuel Laporte was sitting down behind and did not play.

And because of my privileged position I asked Miqueu about this since encores traditionally include all performing musicians. His answer was Rolex precise, “Buxtehude’s music does not include the oboe as it appeared a bit later in the 18th century.”

An explanation for the funny faces of the first picture illustrating this blog is as follows. After I took two photographs of the three serious musicians it was Alex Potter who asked, "Can we do something silly?" They did.

I would recommend the following upcoming Festival Vancouver concerts if you want to listen to the solo singers of Gli Angeli Genève. On Tuesday August 7th with Stephan MacLeod

De Profundis: 17th- Century Sacred Music for Solo Bass

In that above concert you can enjoy Vancouver's Turning Point Ensemble (and Capella Borealist trombonist) Jeremy Berckman play the instrument's ancestor, the sackbut and with three more sackbut players. 

On Wednesday August 8 Britten - Abraham and Isaac

 with Alex Potter and Thomas Hobbs accompanied by Alexander Weimann on the piano.

And on Friday August 10 at the Chan the festival closes with Bach Trauer Ode BWW 198 with all Gli Angeli Genève soloists and the Pacific Baroque Orchestra.








Ventanas a lo insólito - Windows into the Unusual
Friday, August 03, 2018




The pictures in this blog have appeared elsewhere in other blogs and particularly in this one related to Julio Cortázar’s Las Babas del Diablo which served as inspiration to Antonioni’s 1966 film Blow-Up.
The film added to my still hazy and uncertain desire to become a photographer at a time when it was not considered a profession. My mother saw me as a doctor or engineer.

In this 21st century when some say that the smart phone has killed photography (I don’t agree) I find inspiration to take photographs in which I choose the location, the lights and my subject. I don’t go out to the street in lookout for photographs and that decisive moment. I firmly believe in that decisive moments have to be created.



For all the years that I had that lovely studio on Granville and Robson I told anybody who would listen that I had light that was unique. On sunny afternoons the sun would shine on Eaton’s (later Sears) and it would reflect into the windows of my studio. It would go to the opposite white wall (the studio was long and narrow) and reflect back.

But I was mostly an idiot and I would close the incoming light with black curtains and use my own lights. I would tell a few of my friends that I liked to eliminate God’s light and create my own. Idiocy knows no bounds.

In this series of photographs I had two favourite subjects to pose. One was Jo-Ann (now a psychiatric nurse) and appropriately posing on m psychiatric sofa. The other was Leslie and also on the sofa.
But now I am intrigued by the fact that the window which played second fiddle so often might have a minute minute of fame in this blog.




The title of the blog is from a fine essay on photography (alas no translation into English) by Julio Cortázar.

Ventanas a lo insólito
 Julio Cortázar

Se tiende a pensar que la fotografía como un documento o una composición artística; ambas finalidades se confunden a veces en una sola: el documento es bello, o su valor estético contiene un valor histórico o cultural. Entre esa doble propuesta o intención se desliza alguna veces lo insólito como el gato que salta a un escenario en plena representación, o a aquel gorrioncito que una vez, cuando era joven, voló largo ato sobre la cabeza de Yahudi Menuhin que tocaba Mozart en un teatro de Buenos Aires (Después de todo no era tan insólito; Mozart es una prueba perfecta de que el hombre puede hacer alianza con el pájaro.


Hay una búsqueda deliberada de lo excepcional, y hay eso que aparece inesperadamente y que sólo se revela cuando la foto ha sido revelada. Sus maneras de darse no tienen importancia, y si una irrupción no buscada es acaso la más bella y la más intensa, también es bueno que el fotógrafo pararrayos salga a la calle con la esperanza de encontrarla; toda provocación de fuerzas no legislables alcanza alguna vez su recompensa, aunque ésta pueda darse como sorpresa e incluso como pavor.


 Dime cómo fotografías y te diré quién eres. Hay gente que a lo largo de la vida sólo colecciona imágenes previsibles (son en general, los que hacen bostezar a sus amigos con interminables proyecciones de diapositivas), pero otros atrapan lo inatrapable a sabiendas o por lo que después la gente llamará casualidad. Algo sabía de eso Brancusi el día que un joven pintor desconocido rumano como él, llegó a su taller en busca de lecciones. Antes de aceptar, el maestro le puso en las manos una vieja Kodak y le pidió que tomara fotos de París y que se las trajera. Asustado ante esta conducta zen avant la leerte, el joven tomó las fotos que se le ocurrieron, y Brancusi las aprobó como si la bastaran para saber que ese muchacho era ya, avant la lettre, Victor Brauner. Lo que no sabía ni el uno ni el otro era que una de las fotos callejera incluía la fachada de una hotel donde años después, en una noche demasiado llena de alcohol, un vado arrojado por el escultor Domínguez le arrancaría un ojo a Brauner. Allí lo insólito jugó un billar complejo, y se deslizó en una imagen que sólo parecería tener finalidades estéticas, adelantándose al presente y fijando (un visor, y detrás de él un ojo) ese destino no sospechado.





Desde que empecé a tomar fotos en mi lejana juventud de pampas argentinas, el sentimiento de lo fantástico me esperó en ese momento maravilloso en que el papel sensible, flotando en la cubeta, repite en pequeño el misterio de toda creación, de todo nacimiento. Los negativos pueden ser leídos por los profesionales, pero sólo la imagen positiva contiene la respuesta a esas preguntas que son las fotos cuando el que las toma interroga a su manera la realidad exterior. No estaba en mí el don de atrapar lo insólito con una cámara, pues aparte de algunas sorpresas menores mis fotos fueron siempre la réplica amable a lo que había buscado en el instante de tomarlas. Por eso, y por estar condenado a la escritura, me desquité en ella de la decepción de mis fotos, y un día escribí “Las babas del diablo” sin sospechar que lo insólito me esperaba más allá del relato para devolverme a la dimensión de la fotografía el año en que Michelangelo Antonioni convirtió mis palabras en las imágenes de Blow up. También aquí lo insólito lanzó su lento bumerang: mi esperanza y mi nostalgia de fotógrafos sin dominio sobre las fuerzas extrañas que suelen manifestarse en las instantáneas, despertó en un cineasta el deseo de mostrar cómo una foto en la que se desliza lo inesperado puede incidir sobre el destino de quien lo toma sin sospechar lo que allí se agazapa. En este caso lo excepcional no repercutió en la realidad exterior; incapaz de captarlo a través de la fotografía, me fue dada la admirable recompensa de quien alguien como Antonioni convierte mi escritura en imágenes, y que el bumerang volviera a mi mano después de un lento, imprevisible vuelo de veinte años.







No me atraen demasiado las fotos en las que el elemento insólito se muestra por obra de la composición, del contraste de heterogeneidades, del artificio en último término. Si lo insólito sorprende, también él tiene que ser sorprendido por quien lo fija en una instantánea. La regla del juego es la espontaneidad, y por eso las fotos que más admiro en ese terreno son técnicamente malas, ya que no hay tiempo que perder cuando lo extraño asoma en un cruce de calles, en un juego de nubes o en una puerta entornada. Lo insólito no se inventa, a lo sumo se lo favorece, y en ese plano la fotografía no se diferencia en nada de la literatura y del amor, zonas de elección de lo excepcional y lo privilegiado.


Como en la vida, lo insólito puede darse sin nada que lo destaque violentamente de lo habitual. Sabemos que esos momentos en que algo nos descoloca o se descoloca, ya sea el tradicional sentimiento de déjà vu o ese instantáneo deslizarse que se opera por fuera o por dentro de nosotros y que de alguna manera nos pone en el clima de una foto movida, allí donde una mano sale levemente de sí misma para acariciar una zona donde a su vez un vaso resbala como una bailarina para ocupar otra región del aire. Hay así fotos en las que nada es les por sí insólito: fotos de cumpleaños, de manifestaciones callejeras, de combates de box, de campos de batalla, de ceremonias universitarias. Uno las mira con esa indiferencias a la que nos han acostumbrado las mass media; una foto más después de tantas otras, recurrencia cotidiana de periódicos y revistas. De golpe, ahí donde Jacques Marchais estrecha la mano de un campesino normando en un mercado callejero, ahí donde un banquero de Wall Street celebra sus bodas de plata en un salón de inenarrable estupidez decorativa, el ojo del que sabe ver (¿pero quien sabe nada en este terreno de instantáneos cortes en el continuo del tiempo y del espacio?) percibe la mirada horriblemente codiciosa que un camarero perdido en el fondo de una sala dirige a una señora afligida por un sombrero de plumas, o más allá de una puerta distingue temblorosamente algo que podría se un velo de novia en el austero tribunal que está juzgando a un ladrón de caballos. He visto fotos así al o largo de toda mi vida, del mismo modo que siendo niño descubrí rincones misteriosamente develadores en los grabados que ilustran a Julio Verne o a Héctor Malos: rincón de la maravilla, mínima línea de fuga que convertía una escena trivial en un lugar privilegiado de encuentro, encrucijada donde espera otras formas, otros destinos, otras razones de vida y de muerte.







Quizá, finalmente, la fotografía dé razón a quienes creyeron en el siglo pasado que los ojos de los asesinatos conservan la imagen última del que avanza con el puñal en alto. No sé si me equivoco, creo que uno de los episodios en Rocambole hay alguien que fotografía los ojos de un muerto y rescata la imagen que delatará al culpable, en todo caso recuerdo como uno de mis muchos pavores de infancia. Por eso quizá sigo entrando en cualquier foto como si fuera a darme una respuesta o una clave fuera del tiempo: ese novio sonriente al pie del altar, ¿no será ya el asesino futuro la mujer que lo contempla enamorada? De alguna manera, la exploración de cualquier fotografía es infinita puesto que admite, como todas las cosas, múltiples lecturas, y lo insólito se sitúa casi siempre en la más prosaica y la más inocente. Estamos en una no man’s land cuya combinatoria no conoce límites, como no sea la imaginación de quien entra en el territorio de ese espejo de papel orientado hacia otra cosa; la sola diferencia entre ver y mirar, entre hojear y detenerse, es la que media entre vivir aceptando y vivir cuestionando. Toda fotografía es un reto, una apertura, un quizá; lo insólito espera a ese visitante que sabe servirse de las llaves, que no acepta lo que se le propone y que prefiere, como la mujer de Barba Azul, abrir las puertas prohibidas por la costumbre y la indiferencia.



Todo fotógrafo convencional confía en que sus instantáneas reflejarán lo más fielmente posible la escena escogida su luz, sus personajes y su fondo. A mí me ha ocurrido desear desde siempre lo contrario, que bruscamente la realidad se vea desmentida o enriquecida por la foto, que se deslice en ella el elemento insólito que cambiará una cena de aniversario en una confesión colectiva de odios y envidias o, todavía mas deliberadamente, en un accidente ferroviario o en un concilio papal. Después de todo, ¿quién puede estar seguro de la fidelidad de las imágenes sobre el papel? Basta mirarlas de cerca para sentir que hay algo más o algo menos que desplaza los centros usuales de la gravedad, así como en las fotos de grupos escolares donde se trata de mostrar a posteriori la presencia ilustre de Rómulo Gallegos o de Alain Fournier, es fatal que otros rostros se interpongan con más fuerza y que el único recurso sea indicar con una cruz menos presente, al menos interesante del grupo.





Las cámaras polaroid multiplican el vértigo de quien presiente la irrupción de lo insólito en la imagen esperada. Nada más alucinante que ver nacer los colores, las formas, avanzar desde el fondo del papel una silueta, un caballo, una bicicleta o un cura párroco que lentamente se concretan, se concentran en sí mismos, parecen luchar por definirse y copiar lo que son fuera de la cámara. Todo el mundo acepta en resultado, y pocos son los que perciben que el modelo no es exactamente el mismo, que el aura de la foto muestra otras cosas, descubre otras relaciones humanas, tiende puentes que sólo la imaginación alcanza a franquear. En un cuento mío (ya se sabe que no soy fotógrafo) alguien que ha tomado instantáneas de cuadros naif pintados por campesinos de Nicaragua, descubre al proyectar las diapositivas en París que el resultado es otro, que las imágenes reflejan en sus formas más horribles y más extremas la realidad cotidiana del drama latinoamericano, la persecución y la tortura y la muerte que han sentado ahí sus cuarteles de sangre. Como se ve, mi sentimiento de lo insólito en la fotografía no es demasiado verificable. ¿Pero no es precisamente eso signo de lo insólito?



(1978)





In every dream a room - Joyce Carol Oates
Thursday, August 02, 2018



The First Room
By Joyce Carol Oates

In every dream of a room
the first room intrudes.
No matter the years, the tears dried
and forgotten, it is the skeleton
of the first that protrudes.

An then it will be nothing at all



And then it will be nothing at all - Joyce Carol Oates
Wednesday, August 01, 2018




          In every room a dream



Amplia victoria de los traseros - Mario Benedetti
Tuesday, July 31, 2018



 La Tregua - Mario Benedetti

Si alguna vez me suicido, será en domingo. Es el día más desalentador, el más insulso. Quisiera quedarme en la cama hasta tarde, por lo menos hasta las nueve o las diez, pero a las seis y media me despierto solo y ya no puedo pegar los ojos. A veces pienso qué haré cuando toda mi vida sea domingo. Quién sabe, a lo mejor me acostumbro a despertarme a las diez. Fui a almorzar al Centro, porque los muchachos se fueron por el fin de semana, cada uno por su lado. Comí solo. Ni siquiera me sentí con fuerzas para entablar con el mozo el facilongo y ritual intercambio de opiniones sobre el calor y los turistas. Dos mesas más allá, había otro solitario. Tenía el ceño fruncido, partía los pancitos a puñetazos. Dos o tres veces lo miré, y en una oportunidad me crucé con sus ojos. Me pareció que allí había odio. ¿Qué habría para él en mis ojos? Debe ser una regla general que los solitarios no simpaticemos. ¿O será que, sencillamente, somos antipáticos?

 Volví a casa, dormí la siesta y me levanté pesado, de mal humor. Tomé unos mates y me fastidió que estuviera amargo. Entonces me vestí y me fui otra vez al Centro. Esta vez me metí en un café; conseguí una mesa junto a la ventana. En un lapso de una hora y cuarto, pasaron exactamente treinta y cinco mujeres de interés. Para entretenerme hice una estadística sobre qué me gustaba más en cada una de ellas. Lo apunté en la servilleta de papel. Este es el resultado. De dos, me gustó la cara; de cuatro, el pelo; de seis, el busto; de ocho, las piernas; de quince, el trasero. Amplia victoria de los traseros.

Nostalgia for your skin 
I si Dios fuera mujer
Una mujer desnuda y en lo oscuro



Las Líneas de la Mano - A Hand's Lines
Monday, July 30, 2018




  
Las Líneas de la Mano (English translation below) Julio Cortázar

De una carta tirada sobre la mesa sale una línea que corre por la plancha de pino y baja por una pata. Basta mirar bien para descubrir que la línea continúa por el piso de parqué, remonta el muro, entra en una lámina que reproduce un cuadro de Boucher, dibuja la espalda de una mujer reclinada en un diván y por fin escapa de la habitación por el techo y desciende en la cadena del pararrayos hasta la calle. Ahí es difícil seguirla a causa del tránsito, pero con atención se la verá subir por la rueda del autobús estacionado en la esquina y que lleva al puerto. Allí baja por la media de nilón cristal de la pasajera más rubia, entra en el territorio hostil de las aduanas, rampa y repta y zigzaguea hasta el muelle mayor y allí (pero es difícil verla, sólo las ratas la siguen para trepar a bordo) sube al barco de turbinas sonoras, corre por las planchas de la cubierta de primera clase, salva con dificultad la escotilla mayor y en una cabina, donde un hombre triste bebe coñac y escucha la sirena de partida, remonta por la costura del pantalón, por el chaleco de punto, se desliza hacia el codo y con un último esfuerzo se guarece en la palma de la mano derecha, que en ese instante empieza a cerrarse sobre la culata de una pistola.


Francois Boucher
A hand’s lines – Julio Cortázar

From a letter thrown on the table, a line extracts itself and runs along the pinewood then goes down a leg. If you look closely, you can see the line continue along the hardwood floor, climb the wall, enter a metal plate that is reproducing a painting by Boucher, trace the back of a woman reclining on a sofa, and finally escape the room by the roof and descend a chain of lightening rods to get to the street. It’s difficult to follow it because of the traffic, but if you focus, you’ll see it climbing the wheel of the bus parked on the corner that goes to the port. There it gets off the bus on the nylon stocking of the blondest passenger, passes through the hostile territory of customs, and crawls and zig zags to the wharf, and there (its difficult to see it, only the rats follow it to get on board) it gets on the boat with the loud turbines, runs along the first class deck, overcomes with difficulty the main porthole, and enters a cabin, where a sad man drinks cognac and listens to the farewell siren. It climbs the lining of his pants, then his vest, and slides along towards his elbow. Then with one last effort, it takes refuge in the man’s right hand palm, which in that instant starts to close on the butt of a handgun.



     

Previous Posts
Acidanthera murielae

Once the Pictures are Digitized, Everything Old is...

Kay

My Photographic Lineage With Lisa

Remembrance - Not

The Potentiality of a Rosebud

The Darkroom & the Glove

Beauty in Fall Decay

A Post-Halloween-Pre-Christmassy-Rant

No Tigers, Clowns or Brass Bands - Backbone a Circ...



Archives
1/15/06 - 1/22/06

1/22/06 - 1/29/06

1/29/06 - 2/5/06

2/5/06 - 2/12/06

2/12/06 - 2/19/06

2/19/06 - 2/26/06

2/26/06 - 3/5/06

3/5/06 - 3/12/06

3/12/06 - 3/19/06

3/19/06 - 3/26/06

3/26/06 - 4/2/06

4/2/06 - 4/9/06

4/9/06 - 4/16/06

4/16/06 - 4/23/06

4/23/06 - 4/30/06

4/30/06 - 5/7/06

5/7/06 - 5/14/06

5/14/06 - 5/21/06

5/21/06 - 5/28/06

5/28/06 - 6/4/06

6/4/06 - 6/11/06

6/11/06 - 6/18/06

6/18/06 - 6/25/06

6/25/06 - 7/2/06

7/2/06 - 7/9/06

7/9/06 - 7/16/06

7/16/06 - 7/23/06

7/23/06 - 7/30/06

7/30/06 - 8/6/06

8/6/06 - 8/13/06

8/13/06 - 8/20/06

8/20/06 - 8/27/06

8/27/06 - 9/3/06

9/3/06 - 9/10/06

9/10/06 - 9/17/06

9/17/06 - 9/24/06

9/24/06 - 10/1/06

10/1/06 - 10/8/06

10/8/06 - 10/15/06

10/15/06 - 10/22/06

10/22/06 - 10/29/06

10/29/06 - 11/5/06

11/5/06 - 11/12/06

11/12/06 - 11/19/06

11/19/06 - 11/26/06

11/26/06 - 12/3/06

12/3/06 - 12/10/06

12/10/06 - 12/17/06

12/17/06 - 12/24/06

12/24/06 - 12/31/06

12/31/06 - 1/7/07

1/7/07 - 1/14/07

1/14/07 - 1/21/07

1/21/07 - 1/28/07

1/28/07 - 2/4/07

2/4/07 - 2/11/07

2/11/07 - 2/18/07

2/18/07 - 2/25/07

2/25/07 - 3/4/07

3/4/07 - 3/11/07

3/11/07 - 3/18/07

3/18/07 - 3/25/07

3/25/07 - 4/1/07

4/1/07 - 4/8/07

4/8/07 - 4/15/07

4/15/07 - 4/22/07

4/22/07 - 4/29/07

4/29/07 - 5/6/07

5/6/07 - 5/13/07

5/13/07 - 5/20/07

5/20/07 - 5/27/07

5/27/07 - 6/3/07

6/3/07 - 6/10/07

6/10/07 - 6/17/07

6/17/07 - 6/24/07

6/24/07 - 7/1/07

7/1/07 - 7/8/07

7/8/07 - 7/15/07

7/15/07 - 7/22/07

7/22/07 - 7/29/07

7/29/07 - 8/5/07

8/5/07 - 8/12/07

8/12/07 - 8/19/07

8/19/07 - 8/26/07

8/26/07 - 9/2/07

9/2/07 - 9/9/07

9/9/07 - 9/16/07

9/16/07 - 9/23/07

9/23/07 - 9/30/07

9/30/07 - 10/7/07

10/7/07 - 10/14/07

10/14/07 - 10/21/07

10/21/07 - 10/28/07

10/28/07 - 11/4/07

11/4/07 - 11/11/07

11/11/07 - 11/18/07

11/18/07 - 11/25/07

11/25/07 - 12/2/07

12/2/07 - 12/9/07

12/9/07 - 12/16/07

12/16/07 - 12/23/07

12/23/07 - 12/30/07

12/30/07 - 1/6/08

1/6/08 - 1/13/08

1/13/08 - 1/20/08

1/20/08 - 1/27/08

1/27/08 - 2/3/08

2/3/08 - 2/10/08

2/10/08 - 2/17/08

2/17/08 - 2/24/08

2/24/08 - 3/2/08

3/2/08 - 3/9/08

3/9/08 - 3/16/08

3/16/08 - 3/23/08

3/23/08 - 3/30/08

3/30/08 - 4/6/08

4/6/08 - 4/13/08

4/13/08 - 4/20/08

4/20/08 - 4/27/08

4/27/08 - 5/4/08

5/4/08 - 5/11/08

5/11/08 - 5/18/08

5/18/08 - 5/25/08

5/25/08 - 6/1/08

6/1/08 - 6/8/08

6/8/08 - 6/15/08

6/15/08 - 6/22/08

6/22/08 - 6/29/08

6/29/08 - 7/6/08

7/6/08 - 7/13/08

7/13/08 - 7/20/08

7/20/08 - 7/27/08

7/27/08 - 8/3/08

8/3/08 - 8/10/08

8/10/08 - 8/17/08

8/17/08 - 8/24/08

8/24/08 - 8/31/08

8/31/08 - 9/7/08

9/7/08 - 9/14/08

9/14/08 - 9/21/08

9/21/08 - 9/28/08

9/28/08 - 10/5/08

10/5/08 - 10/12/08

10/12/08 - 10/19/08

10/19/08 - 10/26/08

10/26/08 - 11/2/08

11/2/08 - 11/9/08

11/9/08 - 11/16/08

11/16/08 - 11/23/08

11/23/08 - 11/30/08

11/30/08 - 12/7/08

12/7/08 - 12/14/08

12/14/08 - 12/21/08

12/21/08 - 12/28/08

12/28/08 - 1/4/09

1/4/09 - 1/11/09

1/11/09 - 1/18/09

1/18/09 - 1/25/09

1/25/09 - 2/1/09

2/1/09 - 2/8/09

2/8/09 - 2/15/09

2/15/09 - 2/22/09

2/22/09 - 3/1/09

3/1/09 - 3/8/09

3/8/09 - 3/15/09

3/15/09 - 3/22/09

3/22/09 - 3/29/09

3/29/09 - 4/5/09

4/5/09 - 4/12/09

4/12/09 - 4/19/09

4/19/09 - 4/26/09

4/26/09 - 5/3/09

5/3/09 - 5/10/09

5/10/09 - 5/17/09

5/17/09 - 5/24/09

5/24/09 - 5/31/09

5/31/09 - 6/7/09

6/7/09 - 6/14/09

6/14/09 - 6/21/09

6/21/09 - 6/28/09

6/28/09 - 7/5/09

7/5/09 - 7/12/09

7/12/09 - 7/19/09

7/19/09 - 7/26/09

7/26/09 - 8/2/09

8/2/09 - 8/9/09

8/9/09 - 8/16/09

8/16/09 - 8/23/09

8/23/09 - 8/30/09

8/30/09 - 9/6/09

9/6/09 - 9/13/09

9/13/09 - 9/20/09

9/20/09 - 9/27/09

9/27/09 - 10/4/09

10/4/09 - 10/11/09

10/11/09 - 10/18/09

10/18/09 - 10/25/09

10/25/09 - 11/1/09

11/1/09 - 11/8/09

11/8/09 - 11/15/09

11/15/09 - 11/22/09

11/22/09 - 11/29/09

11/29/09 - 12/6/09

12/6/09 - 12/13/09

12/13/09 - 12/20/09

12/20/09 - 12/27/09

12/27/09 - 1/3/10

1/3/10 - 1/10/10

1/10/10 - 1/17/10

1/17/10 - 1/24/10

1/24/10 - 1/31/10

1/31/10 - 2/7/10

2/7/10 - 2/14/10

2/14/10 - 2/21/10

2/21/10 - 2/28/10

2/28/10 - 3/7/10

3/7/10 - 3/14/10

3/14/10 - 3/21/10

3/21/10 - 3/28/10

3/28/10 - 4/4/10

4/4/10 - 4/11/10

4/11/10 - 4/18/10

4/18/10 - 4/25/10

4/25/10 - 5/2/10

5/2/10 - 5/9/10

5/9/10 - 5/16/10

5/16/10 - 5/23/10

5/23/10 - 5/30/10

5/30/10 - 6/6/10

6/6/10 - 6/13/10

6/13/10 - 6/20/10

6/20/10 - 6/27/10

6/27/10 - 7/4/10

7/4/10 - 7/11/10

7/11/10 - 7/18/10

7/18/10 - 7/25/10

7/25/10 - 8/1/10

8/1/10 - 8/8/10

8/8/10 - 8/15/10

8/15/10 - 8/22/10

8/22/10 - 8/29/10

8/29/10 - 9/5/10

9/5/10 - 9/12/10

9/12/10 - 9/19/10

9/19/10 - 9/26/10

9/26/10 - 10/3/10

10/3/10 - 10/10/10

10/10/10 - 10/17/10

10/17/10 - 10/24/10

10/24/10 - 10/31/10

10/31/10 - 11/7/10

11/7/10 - 11/14/10

11/14/10 - 11/21/10

11/21/10 - 11/28/10

11/28/10 - 12/5/10

12/5/10 - 12/12/10

12/12/10 - 12/19/10

12/19/10 - 12/26/10

12/26/10 - 1/2/11

1/2/11 - 1/9/11

1/9/11 - 1/16/11

1/16/11 - 1/23/11

1/23/11 - 1/30/11

1/30/11 - 2/6/11

2/6/11 - 2/13/11

2/13/11 - 2/20/11

2/20/11 - 2/27/11

2/27/11 - 3/6/11

3/6/11 - 3/13/11

3/13/11 - 3/20/11

3/20/11 - 3/27/11

3/27/11 - 4/3/11

4/3/11 - 4/10/11

4/10/11 - 4/17/11

4/17/11 - 4/24/11

4/24/11 - 5/1/11

5/1/11 - 5/8/11

5/8/11 - 5/15/11

5/15/11 - 5/22/11

5/22/11 - 5/29/11

5/29/11 - 6/5/11

6/5/11 - 6/12/11

6/12/11 - 6/19/11

6/19/11 - 6/26/11

6/26/11 - 7/3/11

7/3/11 - 7/10/11

7/10/11 - 7/17/11

7/17/11 - 7/24/11

7/24/11 - 7/31/11

7/31/11 - 8/7/11

8/7/11 - 8/14/11

8/14/11 - 8/21/11

8/21/11 - 8/28/11

8/28/11 - 9/4/11

9/4/11 - 9/11/11

9/11/11 - 9/18/11

9/18/11 - 9/25/11

9/25/11 - 10/2/11

10/2/11 - 10/9/11

10/9/11 - 10/16/11

10/16/11 - 10/23/11

10/23/11 - 10/30/11

10/30/11 - 11/6/11

11/6/11 - 11/13/11

11/13/11 - 11/20/11

11/20/11 - 11/27/11

11/27/11 - 12/4/11

12/4/11 - 12/11/11

12/11/11 - 12/18/11

12/18/11 - 12/25/11

12/25/11 - 1/1/12

1/1/12 - 1/8/12

1/8/12 - 1/15/12

1/15/12 - 1/22/12

1/22/12 - 1/29/12

1/29/12 - 2/5/12

2/5/12 - 2/12/12

2/12/12 - 2/19/12

2/19/12 - 2/26/12

2/26/12 - 3/4/12

3/4/12 - 3/11/12

3/11/12 - 3/18/12

3/18/12 - 3/25/12

3/25/12 - 4/1/12

4/1/12 - 4/8/12

4/8/12 - 4/15/12

4/15/12 - 4/22/12

4/22/12 - 4/29/12

4/29/12 - 5/6/12

5/6/12 - 5/13/12

5/13/12 - 5/20/12

5/20/12 - 5/27/12

5/27/12 - 6/3/12

6/3/12 - 6/10/12

6/10/12 - 6/17/12

6/17/12 - 6/24/12

6/24/12 - 7/1/12

7/1/12 - 7/8/12

7/8/12 - 7/15/12

7/15/12 - 7/22/12

7/22/12 - 7/29/12

7/29/12 - 8/5/12

8/5/12 - 8/12/12

8/12/12 - 8/19/12

8/19/12 - 8/26/12

8/26/12 - 9/2/12

9/2/12 - 9/9/12

9/9/12 - 9/16/12

9/16/12 - 9/23/12

9/23/12 - 9/30/12

9/30/12 - 10/7/12

10/7/12 - 10/14/12

10/14/12 - 10/21/12

10/21/12 - 10/28/12

10/28/12 - 11/4/12

11/4/12 - 11/11/12

11/11/12 - 11/18/12

11/18/12 - 11/25/12

11/25/12 - 12/2/12

12/2/12 - 12/9/12

12/9/12 - 12/16/12

12/16/12 - 12/23/12

12/23/12 - 12/30/12

12/30/12 - 1/6/13

1/6/13 - 1/13/13

1/13/13 - 1/20/13

1/20/13 - 1/27/13

1/27/13 - 2/3/13

2/3/13 - 2/10/13

2/10/13 - 2/17/13

2/17/13 - 2/24/13

2/24/13 - 3/3/13

3/3/13 - 3/10/13

3/10/13 - 3/17/13

3/17/13 - 3/24/13

3/24/13 - 3/31/13

3/31/13 - 4/7/13

4/7/13 - 4/14/13

4/14/13 - 4/21/13

4/21/13 - 4/28/13

4/28/13 - 5/5/13

5/5/13 - 5/12/13

5/12/13 - 5/19/13

5/19/13 - 5/26/13

5/26/13 - 6/2/13

6/2/13 - 6/9/13

6/9/13 - 6/16/13

6/16/13 - 6/23/13

6/23/13 - 6/30/13

6/30/13 - 7/7/13

7/7/13 - 7/14/13

7/14/13 - 7/21/13

7/21/13 - 7/28/13

7/28/13 - 8/4/13

8/4/13 - 8/11/13

8/11/13 - 8/18/13

8/18/13 - 8/25/13

8/25/13 - 9/1/13

9/1/13 - 9/8/13

9/8/13 - 9/15/13

9/15/13 - 9/22/13

9/22/13 - 9/29/13

9/29/13 - 10/6/13

10/6/13 - 10/13/13

10/13/13 - 10/20/13

10/20/13 - 10/27/13

10/27/13 - 11/3/13

11/3/13 - 11/10/13

11/10/13 - 11/17/13

11/17/13 - 11/24/13

11/24/13 - 12/1/13

12/1/13 - 12/8/13

12/8/13 - 12/15/13

12/15/13 - 12/22/13

12/22/13 - 12/29/13

12/29/13 - 1/5/14

1/5/14 - 1/12/14

1/12/14 - 1/19/14

1/19/14 - 1/26/14

1/26/14 - 2/2/14

2/2/14 - 2/9/14

2/9/14 - 2/16/14

2/16/14 - 2/23/14

2/23/14 - 3/2/14

3/2/14 - 3/9/14

3/9/14 - 3/16/14

3/16/14 - 3/23/14

3/23/14 - 3/30/14

3/30/14 - 4/6/14

4/6/14 - 4/13/14

4/13/14 - 4/20/14

4/20/14 - 4/27/14

4/27/14 - 5/4/14

5/4/14 - 5/11/14

5/11/14 - 5/18/14

5/18/14 - 5/25/14

5/25/14 - 6/1/14

6/1/14 - 6/8/14

6/8/14 - 6/15/14

6/15/14 - 6/22/14

6/22/14 - 6/29/14

6/29/14 - 7/6/14

7/6/14 - 7/13/14

7/13/14 - 7/20/14

7/20/14 - 7/27/14

7/27/14 - 8/3/14

8/3/14 - 8/10/14

8/10/14 - 8/17/14

8/17/14 - 8/24/14

8/24/14 - 8/31/14

8/31/14 - 9/7/14

9/7/14 - 9/14/14

9/14/14 - 9/21/14

9/21/14 - 9/28/14

9/28/14 - 10/5/14

10/5/14 - 10/12/14

10/12/14 - 10/19/14

10/19/14 - 10/26/14

10/26/14 - 11/2/14

11/2/14 - 11/9/14

11/9/14 - 11/16/14

11/16/14 - 11/23/14

11/23/14 - 11/30/14

11/30/14 - 12/7/14

12/7/14 - 12/14/14

12/14/14 - 12/21/14

12/21/14 - 12/28/14

12/28/14 - 1/4/15

1/4/15 - 1/11/15

1/11/15 - 1/18/15

1/18/15 - 1/25/15

1/25/15 - 2/1/15

2/1/15 - 2/8/15

2/8/15 - 2/15/15

2/15/15 - 2/22/15

2/22/15 - 3/1/15

3/1/15 - 3/8/15

3/8/15 - 3/15/15

3/15/15 - 3/22/15

3/22/15 - 3/29/15

3/29/15 - 4/5/15

4/5/15 - 4/12/15

4/12/15 - 4/19/15

4/19/15 - 4/26/15

4/26/15 - 5/3/15

5/3/15 - 5/10/15

5/10/15 - 5/17/15

5/17/15 - 5/24/15

5/24/15 - 5/31/15

5/31/15 - 6/7/15

6/7/15 - 6/14/15

6/14/15 - 6/21/15

6/21/15 - 6/28/15

6/28/15 - 7/5/15

7/5/15 - 7/12/15

7/12/15 - 7/19/15

7/19/15 - 7/26/15

7/26/15 - 8/2/15

8/2/15 - 8/9/15

8/9/15 - 8/16/15

8/16/15 - 8/23/15

8/23/15 - 8/30/15

8/30/15 - 9/6/15

9/6/15 - 9/13/15

9/13/15 - 9/20/15

9/20/15 - 9/27/15

9/27/15 - 10/4/15

10/4/15 - 10/11/15

10/18/15 - 10/25/15

10/25/15 - 11/1/15

11/1/15 - 11/8/15

11/8/15 - 11/15/15

11/15/15 - 11/22/15

11/22/15 - 11/29/15

11/29/15 - 12/6/15

12/6/15 - 12/13/15

12/13/15 - 12/20/15

12/20/15 - 12/27/15

12/27/15 - 1/3/16

1/3/16 - 1/10/16

1/10/16 - 1/17/16

1/31/16 - 2/7/16

2/7/16 - 2/14/16

2/14/16 - 2/21/16

2/21/16 - 2/28/16

2/28/16 - 3/6/16

3/6/16 - 3/13/16

3/13/16 - 3/20/16

3/20/16 - 3/27/16

3/27/16 - 4/3/16

4/3/16 - 4/10/16

4/10/16 - 4/17/16

4/17/16 - 4/24/16

4/24/16 - 5/1/16

5/1/16 - 5/8/16

5/8/16 - 5/15/16

5/15/16 - 5/22/16

5/22/16 - 5/29/16

5/29/16 - 6/5/16

6/5/16 - 6/12/16

6/12/16 - 6/19/16

6/19/16 - 6/26/16

6/26/16 - 7/3/16

7/3/16 - 7/10/16

7/10/16 - 7/17/16

7/17/16 - 7/24/16

7/24/16 - 7/31/16

7/31/16 - 8/7/16

8/7/16 - 8/14/16

8/14/16 - 8/21/16

8/21/16 - 8/28/16

8/28/16 - 9/4/16

9/4/16 - 9/11/16

9/11/16 - 9/18/16

9/18/16 - 9/25/16

9/25/16 - 10/2/16

10/2/16 - 10/9/16

10/9/16 - 10/16/16

10/16/16 - 10/23/16

10/23/16 - 10/30/16

10/30/16 - 11/6/16

11/6/16 - 11/13/16

11/13/16 - 11/20/16

11/20/16 - 11/27/16

11/27/16 - 12/4/16

12/4/16 - 12/11/16

12/11/16 - 12/18/16

12/18/16 - 12/25/16

12/25/16 - 1/1/17

1/1/17 - 1/8/17

1/8/17 - 1/15/17

1/15/17 - 1/22/17

1/22/17 - 1/29/17

1/29/17 - 2/5/17

2/5/17 - 2/12/17

2/12/17 - 2/19/17

2/19/17 - 2/26/17

2/26/17 - 3/5/17

3/5/17 - 3/12/17

3/12/17 - 3/19/17

3/19/17 - 3/26/17

3/26/17 - 4/2/17

4/2/17 - 4/9/17

4/9/17 - 4/16/17

4/16/17 - 4/23/17

4/23/17 - 4/30/17

4/30/17 - 5/7/17

5/7/17 - 5/14/17

5/14/17 - 5/21/17

5/21/17 - 5/28/17

5/28/17 - 6/4/17

6/4/17 - 6/11/17

6/11/17 - 6/18/17

6/18/17 - 6/25/17

6/25/17 - 7/2/17

7/2/17 - 7/9/17

7/9/17 - 7/16/17

7/16/17 - 7/23/17

7/23/17 - 7/30/17

7/30/17 - 8/6/17

8/6/17 - 8/13/17

8/13/17 - 8/20/17

8/20/17 - 8/27/17

8/27/17 - 9/3/17

9/3/17 - 9/10/17

9/10/17 - 9/17/17

9/17/17 - 9/24/17

9/24/17 - 10/1/17

10/1/17 - 10/8/17

10/8/17 - 10/15/17

10/15/17 - 10/22/17

10/22/17 - 10/29/17

10/29/17 - 11/5/17

11/5/17 - 11/12/17

11/12/17 - 11/19/17

11/19/17 - 11/26/17

11/26/17 - 12/3/17

12/3/17 - 12/10/17

12/10/17 - 12/17/17

12/17/17 - 12/24/17

12/24/17 - 12/31/17

12/31/17 - 1/7/18

1/7/18 - 1/14/18

1/14/18 - 1/21/18

1/21/18 - 1/28/18

1/28/18 - 2/4/18

2/4/18 - 2/11/18

2/11/18 - 2/18/18

2/18/18 - 2/25/18

2/25/18 - 3/4/18

3/4/18 - 3/11/18

3/11/18 - 3/18/18

3/18/18 - 3/25/18

3/25/18 - 4/1/18

4/1/18 - 4/8/18

4/8/18 - 4/15/18

4/15/18 - 4/22/18

4/22/18 - 4/29/18

4/29/18 - 5/6/18

5/6/18 - 5/13/18

5/13/18 - 5/20/18

5/20/18 - 5/27/18

5/27/18 - 6/3/18

6/3/18 - 6/10/18

6/10/18 - 6/17/18

6/17/18 - 6/24/18

6/24/18 - 7/1/18

7/1/18 - 7/8/18

7/8/18 - 7/15/18

7/15/18 - 7/22/18

7/22/18 - 7/29/18

7/29/18 - 8/5/18

8/5/18 - 8/12/18

8/12/18 - 8/19/18

8/19/18 - 8/26/18

8/26/18 - 9/2/18

9/2/18 - 9/9/18

9/9/18 - 9/16/18

9/16/18 - 9/23/18

9/23/18 - 9/30/18

9/30/18 - 10/7/18

10/7/18 - 10/14/18

10/14/18 - 10/21/18

10/21/18 - 10/28/18

10/28/18 - 11/4/18

11/4/18 - 11/11/18

11/11/18 - 11/18/18